The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "sailing"

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Your search for posts with tags containing sailing found 34 posts

Publication: “The Alliance of Pirates: Ireland and Atlantic piracy in the early seventeenth century” by Connie Kelleher

Publication: The Alliance of Pirates: Ireland and Atlantic piracy in the early seventeenth century by Connie Kelleher In the early part of the seventeenth-century, along the southwest coast of Ireland, piracy was a way of life. Following the outlawing...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 8 Apr 2020

Whirlwind Weekend

I am pleasantly tired at the end of a busy weekend, which included: a sunset sail, several garden walks, a tour of the Coast Guard’s tall ship Eagle, long conversations into the night, the annual vintage car show on Chestnut Street, and...
From: streets of salem on 12 Aug 2019

What the 16th-century shipwreck found on the Kent coast can tell us about trade in Tudor England

Tudor warship, part of a manuscript presented to Henry VIII in 1546 by Anthony Anthony. British Library.http://www.kentonline.co.uk/whitstable/news/video-experts-uncover-rare-shipwreck-186389/https://theconversation.com/what-the-16th-century-shipwreck-found-on-the-kent-coast-can-tell-us-about-trade-in-tudor-england-100392
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 25 Jul 2018

Sailing without Ahab: Verses 106 (Ahab’s Leg) and 42 (The Whiteness of the Whale)

Cross-posted from the Glasgow Review of Books — SAILING WITHOUT AHAB: AN ECO-POETIC VOYAGE – PART TWO 9 May 2018 by grbed ECOCRITICISM NOW: The essays, reviews, and poetry collected in this thread trace responses to...
From: The Bookfish on 10 May 2018

Fleeing Europe for The Enlightenment

Toward the end of the 17C, Enlightenment thought spread throughout Europe & into the British American colonies lasting well into the 18C.Born by scientific advances , particularly those of Isaac Newton (1642–1727), the inductive method of Francis...
From: 17th-century American Women on 19 Mar 2018

Diet of the Ancient Mariner

https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/diet-of-the-ancient-mariner/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 18 Mar 2018

Over There - Puritans & The Divine Right of Kings

"A Trew Law of Free Monarchs"  James I Stuart   The "Divine Right of Kings." James I. (1566-1625) King of Scotland (as James VI., 1567-1625) First Stuart King of England (as James I., 1603-1625)This oppressive political theory contributed...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Aug 2017

Replica 17th-century ship sails into Ocean City

http://foxbaltimore.com/news/local/ahoy-replica-17th-century-ship-sails-into-ocean-city
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 13 Aug 2017

Advertising Tobacco Over There -1577

1577 Of the Tabaco and of His Greate Vertues The earliest known image of a man smoking, from Tabaco by Anthony Chute. 1590s. Chute was an Elizabethan poet and pamphleteer.  Text from John Frampton's translation of Nicholas Monardes. It was published...
From: 17th-century American Women on 9 Aug 2017

The Lost Bungalows of Great Misery Island

Out on Salem Sound the other day, sailing in a beautiful boat, I looked over at one of the several islands that mark the entrance to Salem Harbor and tried to imagine what once was. Off Great Misery Island there is a calm maritime meeting place referred...
From: streets of salem on 27 Jun 2017

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 85 and Fourth Song

I see the house; my heart, thyself contain; Beware full sails drown not thy tottering barge, Lest joy, by nature apt sprites to enlarge, Thee to thy wrack beyond thy limits strain; Nor do like lords, whose weak confused brain, Not pointing to...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 2 Oct 2015

Quakers in America 17C-18C

Hugh Barbour and J. William Frost, The Quakers (1988). History.com  The Society of Friends, or Quakers, began at the tail end of Europe’s Protestant Reformation in the 17th century. The missionary efforts of the earliest Friends took them to North...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Oct 2014

In Newport, Briefly

We are recently returned from a quick visit to Newport, Rhode Island, somehow refreshed and fatigued at the same time. My husband and I are both so busy at this time of the year that we don’t have much time to get away, so we could only steal a...
From: streets of salem on 9 Sep 2014

Fleeing to America - Jews & their early settlements

.For some decades Jews had flourished in Dutch-held areas of Brazil; but a Portuguese conquest of the area in 1654, confronted them with the prospect of the Inquisition, which had already burned a Brazilian Jew at the stake in 1647.  A shipload of...
From: 17th-century American Women on 5 Jul 2014

Persecution in America - Quaker Martyr Mary Barrett Dyer c 1612-1660 Hanged in Massachusetts

. Mary Barrett Dyer, born in England, challenged the religious persecution of Quakers in the American colonies. She and her husband, William Dyer, emigrated to Massachusetts in 1635, just 2 years after they married in London.  She sympathized...
From: 17th-century American Women on 11 Aug 2013

Fleeing to America - Catholics to Maryland

.Although the Stuart kings of England did not hate the Roman Catholic Church, most of their subjects did, causing Catholics to be harassed and persecuted in England throughout the seventeenth century. Driven by "the sacred duty of finding a refuge for...
From: 17th-century American Women on 10 Aug 2013

Fleeing to America - Quakers

Early Quaker Meeting where men & women + dogs & cats are not separated.The Quakers (or Religious Society of Friends) formed in England in 1652 around a charismatic leader, George Fox (1624-1691). George Fox (1624-1691) wrote a letter...
From: 17th-century American Women on 9 Aug 2013

Fleeing European Persecution - 17th-Century America as a Religious Refuge

.America as a Religious RefugeMany of the British North American colonies that eventually formed the United States of America were settled in the seventeenth century by men and women, who, in the face of European persecution, refused to compromise passionately...
From: 17th-century American Women on 8 Aug 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.