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Your search for posts with tags containing science found 1090 posts

Science in the City – virtual conference

Science in the City 1500-1800 Virtual Conference, 6-7 April 2020 In a couple of weeks, this section of the site will be hosting the programme and content for our virtual conference. We had hoped to have a physical meeting (see our original plans and programme...
From: Metropolitan Science on 23 Mar 2020

The Turducken of Maastricht

When I gave a talk on fossils last year at the Boerhaave Museum in Leiden, my Dutch friends told me to be sure to include a mention of the Maastricht mosasaur, the most famous fossil in the Netherlands, even though I was actually talking about much more...
From: Anita Guerrini on 20 Mar 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXXII

In the seventeenth century large parts of Europe were still Catholic; in 1616 the Catholic Church had placed De revolutionibus and all other texts promoting a heliocentric world-view on the Index of Forbidden Books and in 1632 they added Galileo’s...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 18 Mar 2020

Women in Alchemy

Antonio Neri, 1598-1600,MS Ferguson 67, f. 25r.It is certain that women have participated in the practice of alchemy since its beginnings, but hard documentation is scant. Maria Prophetissima, also known as Mary the Jewess, is perhaps the best known female...
From: Conciatore on 18 Mar 2020

Caterina Sforza

Caterina Sforza, by Lorenzo di Credi(now in the Museum of Forlì.)We remember Antonio Neri mostly for his book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. However, he thought about himself a bit differently; he considered himself first...
From: Conciatore on 16 Mar 2020

War, politics, religion and scientia

There is a strong tendency to view the history of science and the people who produced it in a sort of vacuum, outside of everyday society–Copernicus published this, Kepler published that, Newton synthesised it all… In fact the so-called scientific...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 11 Mar 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXXI

Of all the discoveries made during the first phase of telescopic astronomical discoveries perhaps the more impactful was the discovery by various observers of the phases of Venus, which showed that Venus in fact orbited the Sun and not the Earth. This...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 4 Mar 2020

The Head of a Roman

For the past few weeks, many news outlets have reported that the skull of Pliny the Elder (Gaius Plinius Secundus, ca. 23-79 CE), the Roman naturalist and statesman who died at Pompeii, has been identified.  The latest story, in the New York Times,...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Feb 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXX

As stated earlier the predominant medieval view of the cosmos was an uneasy bundle of Aristotle’s cosmology, Ptolemaic astronomy, Aristotelian terrestrial mechanics, which was not Aristotle’s but had evolved out of it, and Aristotle’s...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 19 Feb 2020

Appel à communication : « Femmes, féminité et parfums au XIXe siècle : Imaginaires olfactifs et construction du genre » (Marseille, 2 octobre 2020)

Appel à communication : « Femmes, féminité et parfums au XIXe siècle : Imaginaires olfactifs et construction du genre » (Marseille, 2 octobre 2020) Atelier du XIXe siècle – Société...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 19 Feb 2020

A Hidden History of Beard Terms!

2020 will be a milestone for me, as it sees the completion of my research, and the submission of my book Concerning Beards: Facial Hair, Health and Practice in England, 1650-1900, in many ways bringing an end to my project on the history of facial hair...
From: DrAlun on 14 Feb 2020

It’s all a question of angles.

Thomas Paine (1736–1809) was an eighteenth-century political radical famous, or perhaps that should be infamous, for two political pamphlets, Common Sense (1776) and Rights of Man (1791) (he also wrote many others) and for being hounded out of England...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 12 Feb 2020

Appel à communication : « Visualiser les origines de la vie : cultures visuelles scientifiques et populaires (XIXe et XXe siècles) » (Paris, 2-3 juin 2020)

Appel à communication : « Visualiser les origines de la vie : cultures visuelles scientifiques et populaires (XIXe et XXe siècles) » (Paris, 2-3 juin 2020) English version below Conférence internationale organisée...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 8 Feb 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: Physics and Fruitcakes

By Simon Werrett In 1767, the Winchester writer Ann Shackleford gave a recipe for clear fruit cakes in her Modern Art of Cookery Improved (1767). A candied fruit juice should be placed ‘upon glass plates, or pieces of glass’ and dried in a...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Feb 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXIX

One of the most well known popular stories told about Galileo is how he dropped balls from the Leaning Tower of Pisa to disprove the Aristotelian hypothesis that balls of different weights would fall at different speeds; the heavier ball falling faster....
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 5 Feb 2020

Robert Fulton’s Submarine Struggles

Here’s another submarine design from the eighteenth century, this one from the artist and inventor Robert Fulton. Fulton was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 1765, and moved to Philadelphia at the end of the Revolutionary War, establishing himself...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Feb 2020

Looking at Submarines in the 1740s

This is a diagram of a submarine. It appeared in the Gentleman’s Magazine in 1747, illustrating an article titled “Description of a diving ship, built by order of his most serene highness Charles Landgrave of Hesse Cassel.” The prince...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Feb 2020

Conférence au Centre allemand d’histoire de l’art – DFK Paris : Rêves d’éternité. De « L’invention de Morel » au triomphe de l’hologramme, par Eric Michaud (mardi 28 janvier 2020)

Conférence au Centre allemand d’histoire de l’art – DFK Paris : Rêves d’éternité. De « L’invention de Morel » au triomphe de l’hologramme, par Eric Michaud (mardi 28...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 27 Jan 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XXVIII

One of the central problems in the transition from the traditional geocentric astronomy/cosmology to a heliocentric one was that the system that the Early Modern astronomers inherited from their medieval predecessors was not just an uneasy amalgam of...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 22 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.