The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing science found 1184 posts

Renaissance Science – IV

We have now reached the period of history that the majority of people automatically think of when the hear or read the name, The Renaissance. The majority probably also think, when the hear the term, of a period in European art history, often called the...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Feb 2021

On the Backs of Tortoises

The Department of History at Northern Illinois University will be holding a virtual colloquium lecture tomorrow.  All NIU students are invited to participate in this History colloquium event, which will be held virtually on Zoom. Elizabeth...

Appel à communication : Journée d’étude « L’économie des images en sciences. Enjeux, modalités et impacts sur la production et la circulation des savoirs (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles) » (Paris, INHA, 28 octobre 2021)

Appel à communication : Journée d’étude « L’économie des images en sciences. Enjeux, modalités et impacts sur la production et la circulation des savoirs (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles) » (Paris,...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 19 Feb 2021

To simplify is to falsify; falsification is used to simplify

The past is not neat and orderly, divided up into handy segments that the historian can parcel up and deliver to his expectant readers. The past is a horribly complex, tangled up mess. If the past were string, it would not be a neatly rolled up ball but...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 17 Feb 2021

Appel à communication : « L’économie des images en sciences Enjeux, modalités et impacts sur la production et la circulation des savoirs (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles) » (Paris, 28 octobre 2021)

Martha Rosler, Cargo Cult, 1966-1972, d’après la série « Body Beautiful, or Beauty Knows No Pain ». Courtesy de l’artiste et de la galerie Nagel Draxler Berlin / Cologne © Martha Rosler. « L’économie...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 16 Feb 2021

“Science Vs” — Celebrating Ignorance?

The podcast “Science Vs” promises to take “on fads, trends, and the opinionated mob to find out what’s fact, what’s not, and what’s somewhere in between.” It covers a range of predictable, conspiracy tinged and...
From: Darin Hayton on 10 Feb 2021

Renaissance Science – III

Due to various factors I am running well behind schedule this week. The post should, all going well, appear here tomorrow!
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 10 Feb 2021

Astrology Handwringing (again)

The BBC has joined the growing number of articles that try to explain away rational and intellectual interest in astrology: “The Anxieties and Apps Fuelling the Astrology Boom.” In this case, the author does a better job distinguishing astrology...
From: Darin Hayton on 8 Feb 2021

Why Fear Astrology?

A recent “The Morning” Newsletter from the NY Times suggested seven podcasts about science for those “trying to learn more about the wonders of science.” Among other pressing wonders of science, these podcasts will let us know...
From: Darin Hayton on 28 Jan 2021

Renaissance Science – II

The so-called Scientific Renaissance at the beginning of the High Middle Ages was truly a renaissance in the sense of the rediscovery or re-emergence of the, predominantly Greek, intellectual culture of antiquity albeit, much of it in this case,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Jan 2021

Monks Using Astronomical Instruments

The manuscript Ambrosiana H 57 sup. includes two texts on the astrolabe, Philoponus’s as well as an anonymous one from perhaps the late 13th century (though this copy is dated 14th century). Along with these texts are a couple Ptolemaic works and...
From: Darin Hayton on 26 Jan 2021

Byzantine Tables of Planetary Hours

The tradition of planetary hours established a ruling planet for each hour of each day. The first hour of the day was ruled by the planet that also gave the day its name, e.g., the sun ruled the first hour of Sunday. Each subsequent hour was ruled by...
From: Darin Hayton on 23 Jan 2021

The man who printed the world of plants

Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598) is justifiably famous for having produced the world’s first modern atlas, that is a bound, printed, uniform collection of maps, his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Ortelius was a wealthy businessman and paid for the publication...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Jan 2021

Bourses d’études : Beckman Center / Science History Institute, Philadelphia

Fellowships 2021-22, Beckman Center / Science History Institute, Philadelphia Application deadline: Jan 25, 2021 Call for Applications: Fellowships at the Science History Institute The Beckman Center for the History of Chemistry at the Science History...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 14 Jan 2021

Renaissance Science – I

To paraphrase what is possibly the most infamous opening sentence in a history of science book[1], there was no such thing as Renaissance science, and this is the is the start of a bog post series about it. Put another way there are all sorts of problems...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 13 Jan 2021

Missing Archives

Not a day goes by that I don’t miss being able to work in the archives. Travel restrictions that prevent me from going to and working in the archives I need for my research depresses me, to say the least. The fact that there is no end in sight compounds...
From: Darin Hayton on 12 Jan 2021

Reflections on the Mirror

 Jan van EyckThe Arnolfini Portrait (1434)L’Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri's 1612 book, would eventually become the glassmakers' bible throughout Europe. By 1900 it had been translated into five different languages besides the original Italian;...
From: Conciatore on 8 Jan 2021

Astrology: Bugbear of Science

A recent survey of the “Conceptions of Science in Byzantium” opens with a general comment about the term “science”, and by extension the concept “science”. The author roots “science” in the culturally specific...
From: Darin Hayton on 2 Jan 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.