The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing sea found 1975 posts

Seminar on Latin Sources in the Archives of the Crown of Aragon

Graduate students interested in medieval history, and particularly those wanting to learn how to use Latin sources in medieval archives, may be interested in an upcoming Mediterranean Summer Skills Seminar: Introduction to the Archive of the Crown of...

Whifflers, boy players and drummers: project team presents findings

On 13th January 2021 project PI Tracey Hill and postdoctoral research assistant Charlie Berry gave a paper to the Institute of Historical Research’s Centre for People, Place and Community seminar. Tracey and Charlie introduced the methods and...

Plight of the Seamen: Incarceration, Escape, or Secured Freedom

During the Revolutionary War, the British were particularly sensitive to challenges to their maritime sovereignty. Members of the Continental Navy, states’ navy sailors or... The post Plight of the Seamen: Incarceration, Escape, or Secured Freedom...

Fun with Astrological Abbreviations

Copies of (ps-)Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός often contain a variety of common and sometimes not so common abbreviations and symbols for astrological terms. Aphorism 97 in this particular manuscript (BnF gr. 2509) includes...
From: Darin Hayton on 5 Jan 2021

Turquoise Glass

  Turquoise glass stampof calif Mustadi  c.1170.It is estimated that turquoise is among the earliest gems ever mined. With colors that vary from pastel green to a bright sky blue, it has adorned Egyptian sarcophaguses of 5000 years ago,...
From: Conciatore on 30 Dec 2020

Thomas Davies and other British military artists in the Atlantic theater of war, 1757-1758

Denis Robillard In the spring of 2015, a watercolor dated to 1762 entitled An East View of the Great Cataract of Niagara was sold at a Christie’s auction house in London for the stunning price of $217,000. The painting is one of the earliest works...
From: Borealia on 14 Dec 2020

Yellow Fever and Church Attendance

John Adams was certain he made a mistake by going to church. Philadelphia’s yellow fever outbreak only ended in November 1793. On Sunday, December... The post Yellow Fever and Church Attendance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Aphorism 75 and the Challenges for a Critical Edition

Critical editions are incredibly handy. They transform historical artifacts into an easily read, generic version of some text. They smooth out differences between versions, they correct grammar, and they normalize orthography. The labors of intrepid and...
From: Darin Hayton on 4 Dec 2020

At a Crossroads: Connections and Family Formation in Montréal, 1700-175

Alanna Loucks Montréal was always a crossroads. Located along the St. Lawrence River, the continental highway, the city developed as a space defined by mobility and fluidity. This connected and dynamic character influenced the diverse demographic...
From: Borealia on 30 Nov 2020

Settler colonial violence and the Maritime fisheries

Angela Tozer Canadian settler colonialism set the stage for the current attacks on Mi’kmaw fishers from Sipekne’katik First Nation. From the end of summer and into the fall of 2020, settler fishers argued that the Department of Fisheries and...
From: Borealia on 23 Nov 2020

A root “that our French call rosary”: Foodways in Indigenous and French North America

Renée Girard In early modern France, foraging practices were associated with a ‘primitive’ style of food procurement, with times of dearth, and with poverty. God had given nature to his children for them to control, and agriculture...
From: Borealia on 9 Nov 2020

Are we there yet? On the Pandemic, Trumpism, and the History of Anticipation

Jerry Bannister Last spring, in response to Denis McKim’s thoughtful post about the potential impacts of the pandemic on the study of Canadian history, I started a short piece on how the larger social crises were shaping our historical perspectives. ...
From: Borealia on 5 Nov 2020

Deviation, Discovery and Donors: my Last Word on the PEM’s Phillips Library

A big week—was there an election?—as the official judgement from the Massachusetts Judicial Court came down regarding the movement of the Phillips Library to a remote Collection Center by the Peabody Essex Museum in response to the latter’s...
From: streets of salem on 5 Nov 2020

The Magiconomy of Early Modern England

On the night of 8 April 1693, a burglar broke into Thomas Masterman’s house in Stokesley, making off with the hefty sum of £2 10s. To identify the thief and reclaim his money, Masterman trekked south through the north Yorkshire moors to Byland...
From: Forms of Labour on 4 Nov 2020

Thomas Machin and His Chains

Thomas Machin claimed to be a British-trained engineer. His record of achievements in the United States suggests the claim was true. Most of his... The post Thomas Machin and His Chains appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.