The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "settler colonialism"

Your search for posts with tags containing settler colonialism found 15 posts

Exhibiting the Acadian History of Pointe Sainte-Anne

Stephanie Pettigrew [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five- week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton...
From: Borealia on 9 Jul 2019

Review: Christopher M. Parsons, A Not-So-New World

Carla Cevasco reviews Christopher M. Parsons, A Not-So-New World: Empire and Environment in French Colonial North America
From: The Junto on 28 May 2019

Settler Colonialism and Recipes in the Early Modern Maritimes

Edith Snook [This is the second in a series of posts on the Early Modern Maritimes Recipes database. The entire series can be found here.] The region now known as the Maritime provinces of Canada had before 1800 a diverse population that included Indigenous,...
From: Borealia on 24 Apr 2019

CFP: The Fifteenth Annual Yale University American Art Graduate Student Symposium

  Encounters, Entanglements, and Exchanges Fifteenth Annual Yale American Art History Graduate Student Symposium Yale University, New Haven, 6 April 2019 Proposals due by 1 February 2019 Points of encounter can occur across time and space. In colonial...
From: The Junto on 14 Dec 2018

Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America–A Review

Gregory Kennedy Allan Greer, Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America (Cambridge University Press, 2018). This ambitious book considers “the ways in which Europeans and their Euro-American descendants remade...
From: Borealia on 22 Oct 2018

Early-Modern Place Names in Today’s Canada

Lauren Beck The Geographic Names Board of Canada (GNBC) provides scholars with a database of place names that allows users to look up the location of a place name, but that’s about all the information one can glean from this utility. The provinces...
From: Borealia on 10 Oct 2018

Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World: A Review

Ann Little Adele Perry, Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Critical Perspectives on Empire series. If you’re on Twitter this summer of 2017, perhaps your...
From: Borealia on 5 Jun 2017

The American Gaze: Adam Gopnik’s Canada

Jerry Bannister Adam Gopnik’s recent article, “We could all have been Canadians,” published in the May 15th issue of the New Yorker, has attracted considerable attention on social media among Canadian historians.[1] I’ve already...
From: Borealia on 29 May 2017

Canadian Exceptionalism is about Land and Resources

Rachel Bryant Canadian exceptionalism has emerged (or re-emerged) in the Trump/Brexit/Canada 150 era as a useful concept for scholars and journalists seeking to understand how Canadians and their institutions are (or are not) unique in hemispheric and...
From: Borealia on 10 Apr 2017

Why the Exeter Chiefs Should Rebrand Themselves

This blog post originally appeared at the Imperial and Global Forum in June. It’s reposted with slight edits here for reasons I’ll go into below. On any given weekend, you might find yourself on a train platform, surrounded by sports fans...
From: The Junto on 9 Aug 2016

Jamaican Maroons in Nova Scotia: The politics of climate and race

Anya Zilberstein Not long after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau handed winter coats to Syrian refugees arriving in Toronto this past December, reports about the immigrants’ problems began appearing in the press. Rent gouging by dishonest landlords....
From: Borealia on 18 May 2016

Settler Colonialism and the Future of Canadian History

Jerry Bannister In March I had the pleasure of attending the Pierre Savard conference[1] at the University of Ottawa. I was asked to give a talk on the future of Canadian history, particularly the ongoing debate over transnational versus national perspectives....
From: Borealia on 18 Apr 2016

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.