The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "seventeenth century"

Showing 1 - 20 of 248

Your search for posts with tags containing seventeenth century found 248 posts

Book Preview: Mysticism and Millenarianism

This blog post discusses elements of Chapter 5 of my forthcoming book due out in April 2019. You can find out more about the monograph here. The end of the seventeenth century in England witnessed a heightened belief in the imminent second coming of Christ....
From: Theosophical Transactions on 15 Apr 2019

Book Preview: Mysticism vs Rationality

This blog post discusses elements of Chapter 4 of my forthcoming book due out in April 2019. You can find out more about the monograph here. One of the most substantial discussions of mysticism in seventeenth century England concerned its apparent incompatibility...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 9 Apr 2019

Book Preview: Puritan Mysticism

This blog post discusses elements of Chapter 2 of my forthcoming book due out in April 2019. You can find out more about the monograph here. The phrase ‘Puritan mysticism’ has caused many scholars colossal headaches. Firstly, what exactly...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 1 Apr 2019

An Alien UFO was Sighted over #Scotland in 1685 #History #UFO

It sounds like one of Erich von Däniken’s claims of ancient alien contact, but remarkable evidence shows that alien UFOs did visit Scotland in the Seventeenth Century. Did the Scottish Covenanters have a close encounter with an alien spacecraft...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 1 Apr 2019

Book Preview: What is mysticism?

This blog post discusses elements of the introduction to my forthcoming book due out in April 2019. You can find out more about the monograph here. The term ‘mysticism’ is often met with scepticism amongst scholars. What exactly does the word...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 19 Mar 2019

Is Brexit another Revolution?

A touch of history, frustrations with Brexit, regret for my family, and coming from Sunderland. … More Is Brexit another Revolution?
From: Writing Privacy on 15 Mar 2019

Really Rubbish Royal Relics

Sometimes, no all the time, I think that I’m devoting too much time to social media, but occasionally you find yourself in the middle of some very interesting exchanges. The other day a really funny thread about the sheer dreadfulness of English...
From: streets of salem on 20 Feb 2019

Royalist Republicans in the United Provinces

The cover of an excellent book. I have just finished reading Helmer Helmers’ The Royalist Republic (CUP, 2015), which offers a profound challenge to received views of Anglo-Dutch relations during the seventeenth century, in particular the idea...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Dec 2018

Christopher Hill, Andrew Marvell, and the Dissenting Tradition

I owe much of my interest in the seventeenth century to the late historian, Christopher Hill (1912-2003). I went to see Justin Champion deliver an impassioned defence of Hill and his work at a memorial lecture in Newark. … More Christopher Hill,...
From: Writing Privacy on 6 Nov 2018

Fireworks for the Fifth

I’ve been immersed in seventeenth-century English instructional texts during my sabbatical, so it wasn’t difficult to find directions for fireworks for Guy Fawkes Night. Whether it was the foiled Gunpowder plot or the aspirational magnificence...
From: streets of salem on 5 Nov 2018

The Bewitched Wife’s Cure

Since it is Hallowe’en, in this post we look at how bodily waste: urine, hair, and nail clippings were common ingredients in spells, charms against something, and also in spells to remove other spells. V0025811ETC Witchcraft: a white-faced witch...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 31 Oct 2018

A Diet for Old Age

Cake or Boiled Sparrow? by Amie Bolissian McRae Last week newspaper headlines urged the over-65s to ‘Eat butter and cakes to keep … healthy’.[i] The president of the British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, concerned...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 10 Oct 2018

Sugar and Sage in the 17th Century

I’m working on three projects during my sabbatical this semester, but the one that has (re-)captured my attention, and to which I have devoted the most time so far, is an old study of the more utilitarian features of the long English Renaissance,...
From: streets of salem on 7 Oct 2018

Puerto Rico and the Regional Caribbean

For early Americanists, the past two decades have seen an increase in scholarship connecting the early modern Caribbean to colonial North America. The Caribbean adds significant depth and dimension to discussions of race, slavery, diplomacy, capitalism,...
From: The Junto on 25 Sep 2018

The Worst Day/Samuel Wardwell

I always think about the Salem Witch Trials in September, as the cumulative hysteria of 1692 was coming to a close with the execution of the last eight victims on September 22. Every year at this time I ponder a particular aspect of the accusations and...
From: streets of salem on 22 Sep 2018

Review: The New Tudor and Stuart Seafarers Gallery at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

A disclaimer: this post has been written and posted rather more rapidly than usual, as it was only yesterday evening (19 September) that I went with the ‘LadyQJ’ of my Twitter feed (aka Wendy) to the launch event for the four new permanent...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 20 Sep 2018

Considerations on Color

I teach what is commonly known as the “Scientific Revolution” in several of my courses, and I always endeavor to expose my students to the broad range of the “new science” in the seventeenth century as they tend to have a very...
From: streets of salem on 20 Sep 2018

September Strategies

I had high hopes for this particular September, one of the very few Septembers that I didn’t have to go back to school as a student or teacher in my entire life. I’ve always thought that September was one of the most beautiful months of the...
From: streets of salem on 16 Sep 2018

Hang the King and Queen in the Dining Room

Back to the seventeenth century, where I am working my way through a series of instructional books produced to meet the apparent and universal demand for better health, more wealth, and an enhanced quality of life. For most of yesterday I was in the company...
From: streets of salem on 12 Sep 2018

Translation Matters

Some excellent books on early modern translation. I work at the Foreign Services Desk of a news agency and I moonlight as an intellectual historian of early modern Britain. Both jobs have been fostering my obsession with translation. Part of my day...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 7 Sep 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.