The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "sickness"

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Your search for posts with tags containing sickness found 21 posts

Changing Places in America ‒ An Emotional History

By Susan J. Matt (Weber State University) Sitting on a plane last week, I spoke with the woman next to me. An American whose mother was Tongan, she had spent her childhood in Tonga. She missed the small island she’d lived on, noting that ‘everyone...
From: Histories of Emotion on 12 May 2017

Maladies and Medicines

We are very pleased to announce that our new book – coming July 2017 – is now available to pre-order from a range of retail outlets! Maladies and Medicine: Exploring Health and Healing 1540-1740 (Pen and Sword Press) Maladies and Medicine...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 19 Apr 2017

Sick Servants in Early Modern Britain

Historians have done lots of work in recent years on health and medical care in the family in early modern Britain. As such we know much more about what life was like for the sick in the early modern home, how patients were cared for and by whom. The...
From: DrAlun on 11 Jan 2017

Notes from a Newly Discovered English Recipe Book

By Francesca Vanke Sir Robert Paston (1631-1683) of Oxnead Hall in Norfolk was known in his own time for his loyal support of Charles II, his magnificent house and kunstkammer collection, his political activities, and for his chymical and alchemical pursuits....
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Dec 2016

Tales from the archives: Green sickness, red plants

In September, The Recipes Project celebrated its fourth birthday. We now have over 470 posts in our archives and over 117 pages for readers to sift through. That’s a lot of material! (And thank you so much to our contributors for sharing such a...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Nov 2016

Science Mixtape

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to be the guest on Soho Radio’s Science Mixtape with Matilda Hey. If you would like to listen to the show it is available as a podcast.    
From: Early Modern Medicine on 31 Oct 2016

Fowl Medicine: The early modern ‘pigeon cure’

In October 1663 news spread around London that Queen Catherine was gravely ill. Fussed over by a gaggle of physicians and priests, things got so bad that Her Majesty was even given extreme unction in the expectation that she might not pull through. In...
From: DrAlun on 30 Jun 2016

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 1

Where be those roses gone, which sweetened so our eyes? Where those red cheeks, which oft with fair increase did frame The height of honour in the kindly badge of shame? Who hath the crimson weeds stol’n from my morning skies?...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 25 May 2016

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 101

Stella is sick, and in that sickbed lies Sweetness, that breathes and pants as oft as she; And grace, sick too, such fine conclusions tries That sickness brags itself best graced to be. Beauty is sick, but sick in so fair guise That in that...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 13 May 2016

Fever

Throughout the American Revolution, opposing armies fought a common enemy. Primary documents on both sides are full of complaints, descriptions and responses to the attacks of a stubborn adversary; fever. As the Declaration of Independence was being prepared,...

Day 1: Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World, 1400-18

It was with great excitement that the team gathered this summer for the start of our three-day conference Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World. With speakers travelling from around the world to Cambridge, we were relieved to be able to welcome...
From: Domestic Devotions on 1 Sep 2015

Religion & the Sickness Experience in Early Modern Britain.

Over the years, a number of studies have been made of the sickness experiences of clergymen and religious figures as recorded in their diaries. One of the most well known is that of the diarist Ralph Josselin, vicar of Earl’s Colne in Essex. Another,...
From: DrAlun on 2 Jul 2015

Laughing at History

By Netherlandish (possibly Jacob Cornelisz. van Oostsanen) [Public domain], via Wikimedia CommonsYesterday the website The Mary Sue published a post of mine, a short, lighthearted little thing about the malady known as green sickness. After it was published,...
From: Out of Time on 10 Apr 2015

17th-century remedies and the body as an experiment

I have long argued that, for people in the past, the body was a site of experiment. Today, we are constantly told that medicines should be handled with caution. In the accompanying (usually terrifying) leaflets included with most medicines, we are told...
From: DrAlun on 12 Dec 2013

Charles Catton

Charles Catton the elder (1728—1798) subscribed to the first edition of Kirby’s Method of Perspective, where his name is starred as a member of the Academy of Painting. Catton in some ways had a career that paralleled Kirby’s. Where Kirby...
From: Kirby and his world on 5 Sep 2013

How to help your friend get over his ex, c1350

“The 14th century is not ‘Georgian’, you raving lunatic!” I hear you cry. Quite right too. But this medieval suggestion for curing lovesickness is too brilliant not to share. And, in any case, who’s to say some desperate...
From: The History of Love on 22 Aug 2013

Bloodletting in Medicine: The return of the Leech

According to a report on BBC news last week, a Welsh company is now the leading producer of medicinal leeches. The company, based near Swansea, produces over 60,000 leeches for use in hospitals around Britain which, although it pales into insignificance...
From: DrAlun on 21 Aug 2013

A Welsh doctor, Sir Hans Sloane, and the disappearing catheter!

**WARNING: CONTAINS SOME GRAPHIC DESCRIPTION OF A PARTICULARLY UNCOMFORTABLE SURGICAL TECHNIQUE** In 1720, Dr Alban Thomas was something of a high-flyer. The son of a Pembrokeshire cleric and poet, Alban first matriculated from Oxford in 1708, became...
From: Dr Alun Withey on 28 Feb 2013

Norovirus and the reporting of epidemics through history

This winter has already witnessed an unprecedented increase in cases of Norovirus – the so-called ‘winter vomiting bug’. For some reason, across the globe, the infection has spread with increasing virulence and also lingered longer than normal in...
From: Dr Alun Withey on 7 Jan 2013

Green sickness, red plants

By Helen King I’ve been interested for a long time in green sickness, a condition affecting girls at puberty that involved menstrual suppression, often along with some sort of dietary ‘blockage’. The remedies for it, over the 400 or so years that...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Sep 2012

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.