The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "silk"

Showing 1 - 20 of 37

Your search for posts with tags containing silk found 37 posts

Early Modern Aleppo

Aleppo, 1764Antonio Neri is famous for  his 1612 book on making glass, [1] but in the late sixteenth century his father was also famous; Neri Neri, as he was called, was a graduate of  the esteemed 'Studio Fiorentino', head of the Florentine...
From: Conciatore on 6 May 2020

New Additions To My Equipment.

17th-century Jamestown settlers unwind silk fiber from cocoonsdetail of a painting by NPS artist Sydney KingI know, usually I am looking to remove things from my knapsack, but I had a reason to add some things recently. A long time ago a close friend...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 13 Nov 2019

Early Modern Aleppo

Aleppo, 1764Antonio Neri is famous for  his 1612 book on making glass, [1] but in the late sixteenth century his father was also famous; Neri Neri, as he was called, was a graduate of  the esteemed 'Studio Fiorentino', head of the Florentine...
From: Conciatore on 24 Jul 2019

March 31

GUEST CURATOR: Aidan Griffin What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-London Gazette (March 31, 1769). “Mulberry Trees, to the Number of Three-Thousand, to be sold at a reasonable Rate.” If you know anything...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Mar 2019

January 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (January 30, 1769). “We can turn it out in our hands better than any person that ever attempted it in America.”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Jan 2019

Early Modern Aleppo

Aleppo, 1764Antonio Neri is famous for  his 1612 book on making glass, [1] but in the late sixteenth century his father was also famous; Neri Neri, as he was called, was a graduate of  the esteemed 'Studio Fiorentino', head of the Florentine...
From: Conciatore on 29 Oct 2018

Luxurious Tipping Points in Early Massachusetts

Today’s #ColonialCouture post is by Ben Marsh, senior lecturer in history at the University of Kent and author of Georgia’s Frontier Women: Female Fortunes in a Southern Colony (University of Georgia Press, 2012). His current research project...
From: The Junto on 20 Sep 2018

Discover the Huguenots of Spitalfields during October 2018

October is Huguenot Month and we’re delighted to promote this with Huguenots of Spitalfields who are holding a month of events to celebrate Huguenot history and enable people to discover more about these unique and talented people. Huguenots...
From: All Things Georgian on 6 Sep 2018

May 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Supplement to the New-York Journal (May 5, 1768).“He likewise cleans gentlemen and ladies clothes … in as neat a manner as those done in London.” Like many...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 May 2018

Two Refashioned Silk Dresses

Photograph by Laura Wulf @Massachusetts Historical SocietyExhibit Teaser: Two refashioned silk dresses will be featured in the forthcoming exhibition at the Massachusetts Historical Society (https://www.masshist.org) ‘Fashioning the New England...
From: SilkDamask on 28 Dec 2017

Glass History in Aleppo

Aleppo, 1764 Antonio Neri is famous for  his 1612 book on making glass, [1] but in the late sixteenth century his father was also famous; Neri Neri, as he was called, was a graduate of  the esteemed 'Studio Fiorentino', head of the Florentine...
From: Conciatore on 13 Dec 2017

April

GUEST CURATOR: Jonathan Bisceglia What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston-Gazette (April 20, 1767).“A Large & beautiful assortment of Silks.” Silk imports were common during the eighteenth century....
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Apr 2017

February 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (February 18, 1767).“SILK-WORM SEED.” The February 18, 1767, issue of the Georgia Gazette included only a small number of advertisements for consumer...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Feb 2017

Neri's Aleppo Connection

Aleppo, 1764 Antonio Neri is famous for  his 1612 book on making glass, [1] but in the late sixteenth century his father was also famous; Neri Neri, as he was called, was a graduate of  the esteemed 'Studio Fiorentino', head of the Florentine...
From: Conciatore on 30 Dec 2016

November 3

GUEST CURATOR: Nicholas Sears What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Providence Gazette (November 29, 1766).“JUST IMPORTED … silk and worsted mitts … silk knee straps … sewing silk of all...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Nov 2016

November Blogroll: Publishing in the PNW

Dear readers, This month, as part of the process in getting to know my new institution and writing community, the blogroll features publishing outlets affiliated with Pacific and its community. Note that each of these target’s a very disparate group...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 2 Nov 2016

Countdown Day 1: How to keep a silkworm!

Here we are on Day 1 of our Heritage Open Days Countdown and today’s topic is the keeping of silkworms. We have a wonderful little book in our collections called “Instructions for the increasing of Mulberie Trees, and the breeding of Silke-wormes,...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 31 Aug 2016

10 Surprising things we’ve learnt: Heritage Open Days preparation

Heritage Open Days is nearly here and we hope you will be able to join us on September 10th or 11th for our pop-up exhibition in the Queen Elizabeth Hall, here at the Shakespeare Centre.  This year we are looking at the theme of “Gardens and...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 24 Aug 2016

Transmission of drug knowledge in medieval China: A case of Gelsemium

By Yan Liu One striking feature of classical Chinese pharmacology is the abundant use of toxic substances. Prominent examples are aconite, arsenic, and bezoar. Fully aware of the toxicity, or du, of these materials, Chinese doctors developed a variety...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jul 2016

Silk Brocade Shoes “For Exportation”

These dainty silk brocade shoes were made by London boot and shoemaker, Charles Chapman and exported to British America. While we do not know who owned them –the provenance has been lost—they were most likely worn in New England.  The...
From: SilkDamask on 2 Jul 2016

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.