The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "skeletons"

Showing 1 - 20 of 26

Your search for posts with tags containing skeletons found 26 posts

“Stop, here is the empire of death”

Ancient Romans buried their dead outside city walls to avoid contamination.  Medieval Christians, in contrast, kept their dead close, in churchyards or even within church walls, in crypts below the nave or entombed in the floor.  Later, elaborate...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Oct 2020

The Dance of Death and the first printed skeleton

The earliest printed image of a human skeleton is this cartoonish image from a German block book from the 1450s. [i] It is one of a series of skeletons in the popular genre known as the danse macabre or dance of death. Art historian extraordinaire...
From: Anita Guerrini on 19 May 2020

The Turducken of Maastricht

When I gave a talk on fossils last year at the Boerhaave Museum in Leiden, my Dutch friends told me to be sure to include a mention of the Maastricht mosasaur, the most famous fossil in the Netherlands, even though I was actually talking about much more...
From: Anita Guerrini on 20 Mar 2020

The Head of a Roman

For the past few weeks, many news outlets have reported that the skull of Pliny the Elder (Gaius Plinius Secundus, ca. 23-79 CE), the Roman naturalist and statesman who died at Pompeii, has been identified.  The latest story, in the New York Times,...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Feb 2020

The Teeth of Theutobochus

In January 1613, workers at an estate in the Dauphiné, in southeastern France, unearthed a number of large bones.  They included two mandibles with some teeth, a couple of vertebrae, what seemed to be a sternum, a shoulder blade, the heel...
From: Anita Guerrini on 4 Oct 2019

An Anatomy Cabinet

Utrecht, Netherlands, July 2019 Among the many delights for a historian of medicine like me at the University Museum in Utrecht is a reconstructed anatomy cabinet from the late eighteenth century.  It contains objects from the collection of Jan Bleuland...
From: Anita Guerrini on 3 Jul 2019

The Possibility of Giants

Various large bones, discovered across Europe from around 1500 onward, raised the possibility among Renaissance naturalists and intellectuals that very large humans – some five or even ten meters tall – once existed in the past.  The...
From: Anita Guerrini on 16 Mar 2019

The Nun with Blue Teeth

I’m always looking for skeleton stories.  But it’s not often that I come across an article in the scientific literature that includes references to the ancient Greek physician and herbalist Dioscorides (ca. 40-90 CE) or the medieval abbess...
From: Anita Guerrini on 22 Jan 2019

The Skeleton Trade

Although the human skeleton was well known as a symbol of mortality before 1500, the articulated skeleton does not seem to have come into its own as an object –scientific and artistic as well as symbolic – until the time of Vesalius. ...
From: Anita Guerrini on 17 Nov 2018

A Dwarf and his Skeleton

Last month I spent some time in Special Collections at the University of Glasgow Library, looking at the catalogues of the anatomical preparations of London anatomist and man-midwife William Hunter (1718-1783).  Hunter, a Scot, left his collections...
From: Anita Guerrini on 20 Aug 2018

The Gruesome History of Making Human Skeletons

The fabulous online journal Atlas Obscura just published an article on some of my skeleton research.  This is based on the talk, “The Whiteness of Bones,” that I gave a Columbia a couple of weeks ago.  Thanks to Sarah Laskow. ...
From: Anita Guerrini on 3 Oct 2017

Vesalius and the beheaded man

On the 12th of May, 1543, Jakob Karrer von Getweiler was executed in Basel, Switzerland.  Reports say he was beheaded, although hanging was a more usual mode of execution.  Karrer was a bigamist who attacked his legal wife with a knife after...
From: Anita Guerrini on 26 Aug 2016

The Secret Horror of Dissection

The eighteenth-century anatomist William Hunter (1718-1783) told his students that they the practice of dissection “familiarizes the heart to a kind of necessary inhumanity.”(1)   A few decades  earlier, Louis-Jean-Marie Daubenton...
From: Anita Guerrini on 11 May 2016

The Moving Skeleton

Here’s the full version of the Slate blog post: British Library I’ve been reading Charles Burney’s collection of newspapers for close to two decades:  first turning fragile pages in the Rare Books and Music Reading Room at...
From: Anita Guerrini on 2 Nov 2015

On Slate’s The Vault blog: The Moving Skeleton

British Library http://www.slate.com/content/slate/blogs/the_vault/2015/10/30/history_of_automated_skeletons_as_entertainment.html
From: Anita Guerrini on 30 Oct 2015

The Skeleton Trade: Life, Death, and Commerce in Early Modern Europe

Originally posted on Objects in Motion: Material Culture in Transition: Anita Guerrini, Horning Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History at Oregon State University, discusses the fascinating research which she presented atObjects...
From: Anita Guerrini on 9 Jul 2015

An Eighteenth-Century Sweeney Todd

Skeleton, after Vesalius, 1670, Wellcome Images 2 January 2015 A human skeleton was an essential ornament to the early modern dissecting room. Beginning with Vesalius, a number of anatomical textbooks offered instructions for making an articulated skeleton...
From: Anita Guerrini on 3 Jan 2015

Beauty & the Macabre: The World of Dr Paul Koudounaris

“Where do you find your hats?” I ask Dr Paul Koudounaris, writer, art historian, photographer… or as he’d like me to describe him, bon vivant. “Oh, you know. Wherever these things are found.” He replies, nonchalantly, his ringed fingers waving...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 14 May 2014

Peter Plogojowitz unearthed

The extraordinary Terra X documentary Dracula: Die wahre Geschichte der Vampire, that aired on German ZDF in October last year, is now available on Blu-ray in both 3D and 2D. Although primarily a gimmick, the 3D works reasonably well, e.g. in the...
From: Magia Posthuma on 17 Mar 2014

'Vampire' burials that can change a research life

Anthropology PhD student and blogger, Katy Meyers, recently wrote of a symposium on The Odd, the Unusual, and the Strange: Human Deviant Burials and their Cultural Contexts arranged by the Canadian Association of Physical Anthropologists: '[Sandra]...
From: Magia Posthuma on 24 Oct 2013

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.