The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "slavery/emancipation"

Showing 1 - 20 of 289

Your search for posts with tags containing slavery/emancipation found 289 posts

Governance at James Madison’s Montpelier

James Madison’s estate Montpelier was a slave-labor plantation. In fact, Madison appears to have been comfortable with that. He didn’t wrestle with the morality of slaveholding like his friend Thomas Jefferson. He didn’t even acknowledge the contradictions...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jun 2021

Visiting the American Republics

Two historians I follow on Twitter published reviews of Alan Taylor’s American Republics: A Continental History of the United States, 1783–1850 last week.For The New Criterion, Daniel N. Gullotta of Stanford and the Age of Jackson podcast wrote: ...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jun 2021

“Frantic reactions to the teaching of history”

Back in February, Prof. Michael Leroy Oberg of the State University of New York at Geneseo wrote an op-ed essay for the Syracuse Republican addressing legislative pressures to limit what public school history teachers could teach. Oberg wrote: Frantic...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jun 2021

Preservation Panel at Old South, 29 May

This afternoon Revolutionary Spaces is hosting an online panel discussion about the making of one of its landmark buildings: “Boston Beyond: Old South Meeting House’s Global Construction.” The event description says: For nearly 300 years, Old South...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 May 2021

Asians in Eighteenth-Century Massachusetts

South Indians were enslaved in North America well before the two Continental Army soldiers I discussed yesterday.The 9 June 1757 Boston News-Letter included this advertisement: Ran-away from his Master, Ebenezer Webster, of Bradford in the County of Essex,...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 May 2021

Asians in the Continental Army

The Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia just shared a blog post about evidence of Asian soldiers in the Revolutionary War.This doesn’t mean the thousands of soldiers who fought battles in India when the British, the French, and their...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 May 2021

Dublin Seminar on Disabilities, 25-26 June

The 2021 Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife will take place online on 25-26 June. This year’s theme is “Living with Disabilities in New England, 1630-1930.”The founder and longtime director of the Dublin Seminar, Peter Benes, passed away in...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 May 2021

The Right Way to Study the Founders

A few days ago Lindsay Chervinsky, author of The Cabinet, shared some thoughts on continuing to include the most famous Founders in the teaching of U.S. history even as we include more people in our study of the past: We can and should teach the Founding...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 May 2021

Lexington Lectures, 22-24 April

The Lexington Historical Society isn’t resting after a busy Patriots Day weekend. It’s offering four online presentations this week.Thursday, 22 April, 7:00 P.M.The Will of the PeopleProf. T.H. Breen delivers a special Cronin lecture discussing...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Apr 2021

Deerfield Textile Forum on “Invisible Makers,” 10 Apr.

On Saturday, 10 April, Historic Deerfield will host a virtual forum on “Invisible Makers: Textiles, Dress, and Marginalized People in 18th- and 19th-Century America.” The event description says: Globalized manufacturing in the 21st century...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Mar 2021

“The End of Tory Row” Online, 11 March

On the evening of Thursday, 11 March, I’ll offer an online presentation for the Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site about “The End of Tory Row.”For the past several years, I’ve spoken about...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Mar 2021

A Long Search for Hercules Posey

At Zagat, the chef and culinary historian Ramin Ganeshram shared the story of her research into Hercules Posey, head cook at Mount Vernon and the Presidential Mansion in Philadelphia until he freed himself from slavery. In this article, Ganeshram describes...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Feb 2021

Investigating Slaves at the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House

Last month the Cambridge Historical Society issued a report on the history of slavery at its headquarters, called the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House.In particular, the society wanted to collect information about any enslaved people living in that farmhouse...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Feb 2021

“Revolutionary Harbor” Discussion, 17 Feb.

On Wednesday, 17 February, the National Parks of Boston and Boston Harbor Now will host an online discussion on “Revolutionary Harbor: The Transatlantic World of Peter Faneuil,” about the role of slavery in shaping Boston’s eighteenth-century...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Feb 2021

The Records of Congregationalists of Color

Under the project title of “New England’s Hidden Histories,” the Congregational Library and Archives has been digitizing the records of early churches and related documents. The library has just announced the publication of a finding...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Feb 2021

Two Days of the “1776 Report”

On 5 January 2021, the President’s Advisory 1776 Commission (dubbed “The 1776 Commission”) had its first meeting. The next day, the President egged his fans into storming the Capitol building to disrupt the certification of his big election...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jan 2021

Call for Papers on Phillis Wheatley (Peters)

Early American Literature will publish a special issue on the poet Phillis Wheatley, later called Phillis Peters. Here is the call for papers from the editors of this issue. The recognition that Phillis Wheatley (Peters) is a significant figure in early...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Dec 2020

Historic Holiday Presentations

Lots of local historical organizations are offering special online events to make staying healthy at home this season more interesting. Here’s a selection that caught my eye.Sunday, 6 December, 5:00 P.M.Virtual Traditions of the SeasonPaul Revere...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Dec 2020

Van Horn on “The Power of Objects,” Plus a Panel on “Caribbean Connections”

Tonight, on Monday, 30 November, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host an online talk by Jennifer Van Horn on “The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America.” The event description says: Over the course of the eighteenth century,...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Nov 2020

The Disappearance of George Penn

After George Penn sat on the Salem gallows for an hour and was whipped twenty times, as described yesterday, the authorities sent him back to the Essex County jail to finish another part of his sentence for rioting: two years’ imprisonment. At the...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Nov 2020

Page 1 of 15123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.