The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "social history"

Showing 1 - 20 of 60

Your search for posts with tags containing social history found 60 posts

Chavarría-Múgica, “The Problem of Billeting Distribution in Renaissance Spain” Social History 46/3

Fernando Chavarría-Múgica, “The problem of billeting distribution in Renaissance Spain: absolutism, privilege and local oligarchies,” Social History 46/3 (2021).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 17 Sep 2021

Renaissance Fairs and Pandemics

En garde ! Renaissance fairs are reopening across the United States this summer, bringing the clanging of arms and armor back to an enthusiastic public. These festivals celebrate late medieval and Renaissance culture through costume displays and historical...

Diversity in Historical Re-enactments

Colonial Williamsburg, one of the most important sites for historical re-enactment in the United States, is increasingly stressing diversity issues in its historical interpretations of colonial American society. The community of Williamsburg, Virginia,...

Irish in Illinois

I would like to celebrate the publication of The Irish in Illinois a new book by my friends and colleagues, Sean Farrell and Mathieu W. Billings. Sean Farrell works on sectarian violence in Irish history and teaches with me as a Professor of History...

Bergman, “Medical Merchandizing & Legal Procedure in 16th Cent Spain”

Ted Lars Lennart Bergman, “Medical Merchandizing and Legal Procedure in Late Sixteenth-Century Spain: The Case of Petroleum as Imported Medicine,” Social History of Medicine 33/4 (November 2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 2 Feb 2021

“Thrown into this Hospitable Land”: Saint-Dominguans in Virginia, 1796-187

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Frances Bell In October 1809, a Frenchman...
From: Age of Revolutions on 26 Jan 2021

At a Crossroads: Connections and Family Formation in Montréal, 1700-175

Alanna Loucks Montréal was always a crossroads. Located along the St. Lawrence River, the continental highway, the city developed as a space defined by mobility and fluidity. This connected and dynamic character influenced the diverse demographic...
From: Borealia on 30 Nov 2020

Bertomeu-Sánchez, “Colic of Madrid” in Social History of Medicine, Aug

José Ramón Bertomeu-Sánchez, “Colic of Madrid (1788-1814): Experts, Poisons, Politics, and War at the End of the Ancien Régime in Spain,” Social History of Medicine 33/3 (2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 21 Oct 2020

Racist Vandalism on Campus

I was saddened and angered to hear of the racist vandalism on Northern Illinois campus early yesterday (Thursday 17 September 2020) morning, when someone spray-painted racist slurs on the Center for Black Studies in an act of targeted vandalism. This...

CFP: Materializing Race in #VastEarlyAmerica

Materializing Race: An Unconference on Objects and Identity in #VastEarlyAmerica August 24 and 25, 2020 1 PM EST both days (Zoom) Proposals due by August 1, 2020 Organized by Cynthia Chin and Philippe Halbert In a commitment to fostering nuanced interpretations...
From: The Junto on 20 Jul 2020

The Militia and Civic Community in Colonial New Brunswick: Part I, 1786-1816

Service militaire, citoyenneté et culture politique : études des milices au Canada atlantique Nous vous présentons le premier texte d’une série de contributions qui seront publiées au cours des prochaines...
From: Borealia on 18 May 2020

Early American Women Unmasked

A special edition of #ColonialCouture, a Junto roundtable on fashion as history in early American life.  Protective face coverings have emerged as a potent, multifaceted metaphor for the Covid-19 pandemic. Despite inconsistent examples set by elected...
From: The Junto on 5 May 2020

Living through the Revolution: A Chinese Village Man’s Reflections in the Early Twentieth Century

By Weiting Guo Twentieth-century China was home to a series of revolutions. The Xinhai Revolution (1911) and the Chinese Communist Revolution (1949) had a significant impact on China’s politics and society. The Xinhai Revolution brought 2,000 years...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Apr 2020

William, the ‘Wicked Lord’ Byron – actress abducter & cowardly killer?

Dearest readers, A new video is UP! See below for a quick intro to the angry, dissipated career of William, 5th Lord Byron – known to history as ‘the Wicked Lord’ or ‘Devil Byron’/ Features actress abduction, a wolf, &...
From: The History of Love on 10 Apr 2020

Rioting Over the Virgin Mary’s Belt: Enlightenment, Reform, and the Religion of the People in Tuscany

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Shaun Blanchard On the evening of the May 20, 1787, a...
From: Age of Revolutions on 9 Dec 2019

Media Moment 1: Bristol’s Audits

This blog introduces a new series of posts related to Middling Culture research: Media Moments.  These posts will provide short “glimpses” into topics that relate to ordinary, everyday lives in early modern England under the scope...
From: Middling Culture on 10 Oct 2019

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

Thomas Cooper’s “Prison Rhyme” (1845)

By Stephen Basdeo I recently came into possession of a book written by Thomas Cooper (1805-92), a famous Chartist activist, which he gave to his friend, the newspaper proprietor and fellow Chartist, John Cleave (1790-1847). Chartism was the first large-scale...

Titian Portrait on View

A Renaissance masterpiece, Portrait of a Lady in White, is currently on view at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California.  The portrait by Tiziano Vecelli (known as Titian) is on loan from the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister in Dresden and...

“A hot dinner and a bloody supper”: St. Helena’s Christmas Rebellions of 1783 and 1811

By Felix Schürmann Did news of revolutions in the Atlantic world spark revolts on a South Atlantic island in 1783 and 1811, or did a combination of alcohol and Christmas festivities drive soldiers to rebellion? During the Age of Revolutions, the...
From: Age of Revolutions on 17 Dec 2018

Page 1 of 3123Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.