The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "speaking engagements"

Showing 1 - 20 of 123

Your search for posts with tags containing speaking engagements found 123 posts

Perspectives on Boston’s 1764 Smallpox Epidemic

On 13 Apr 1764, John Adams sent his fiancée Abigail a story about being inoculated against smallpox in Boston. Through a cousin of Abigail’s, Dr. Cotton Tufts, Adams and his brother had received a referral to Dr. Nathaniel Perkins. At first...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jun 2020

Online Events and Videos While We Stay Home

With the pandemic, almost every historical site, museum, and society that hosted events has now pivoted to organizing and promoting online events. Sometimes that means an interview with a historian or other expert at home, produced over a platform like...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 May 2020

Prepping for Patriots’ Day 2020 Online

The anniversary of the Battle of Lexington and Concord is coming up on 19 April, so I’ll shift topics (mostly) from the Sestercentennial of the reaction to the Boston Massacre to the opening of the Revolutionary War.Of course, right now we’re...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Apr 2020

The Sestercentennial of the Boston Massacre

The shooting of Christopher Seider led on to the Boston Massacre, one of the major milestones on the road to the American Revolution. The 250th anniversary of the Massacre will be 5 March 2020, but it’s such a big event that there will be multiple...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Feb 2020

“Natives at the Siege” talk in Cambridge, 12 Mar.

On Thursday, 12 March, I’ll speak at the Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site in Cambridge on the topic of “Native Americans at the Siege of Boston.”This is the latest of the annual talks I’ve...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Feb 2020

Looking Back on Jay Talking

I’m writing this on Sunday night. I don’t plan to respond to answers to the 1770 Quiz until after the last entries arrive.Here’s something else I’m not doing tonight: preparing to go on the radio. As of the beginning of this...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Feb 2020

Henry Knox “after about three hours perseverance”

Here’s a link to the podcast recording of my conversation with Bradley Jay of WBZ last month about Col. Henry Knox and his mission to Lake Champlain to obtain more cannon for the Continental siege lines. And here’s a timely question about...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jan 2020

EXTRA: Radio Interviews This Week

I’m scheduled to do two radio interviews this week.In the hour after midnight on Tuesday morning, I’ll speak to Bradley Jay at WBZ, Boston’s 1030 AM. Our topic will be Henry Knox’s expedition to the Lake Champlain fortifications...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Dec 2019

A Dinner in “Plymouth, the great mausoleum”

On 24 Dec 1770, the Old Colony Club of Plymouth met to celebrate Forefathers’ Day, a tradition that went back a whole year but which commemorated an event a century and a half earlier.The club first proclaimed Forefathers’ Day in 1769 to celebrate...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Nov 2019

New Podcast Interviews

A couple of history conversations I’ve had this fall are available as podcasts for your critical listening.Matt Crawford at the Curious Man’s Podcast and I discussed The Road to Concord. Here’s the Apple link and a direct connection...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2019

“Voices from the Boston Massacre” Exhibit at M.H.S.

The Massachusetts Historical Society has opened a new exhibit called “Voices from the Boston Massacre,” displaying documents and artifacts from its collection illuminating that Sestercentennial event of 5 Mar 1770.The exhibit includes trial...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Nov 2019

The Road to Concord Leads on to Townsend

Tomorrow afternoon I’ll speak about The Road to Concord to the Townsend Historical Society.According to Ithamar B. Sawtelle’s History of the Town of Townsend, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (1878), in that town “The alarm to the minute-men...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Nov 2019

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches...

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches wide, 224 full-color pages of maps, charts, and other illustrations of Boston history.I got a copy because I worked with editor Nancy S. Seasholes...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2019

“Battle of Daniels Farm” in Blackstone, 5-6 Oct.

This weekend, 5-6 October, there will be a Revolutionary War encampment and battle reenactment at the Daniels Farmstead in Blackstone (originally part of Mendon), Massachusetts. This event won’t recreate an actual battle. In fact, the scenario is...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Oct 2019

Chatting about the Signers and How They Chatted

I wasn’t planning on a run of weblinks about me, but this morning I’m the interviewee on Dispatches, the Journal of the American Revolution’s podcast. This thirty-minute interview goes over my article about legends of the signing of...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Aug 2019

When the “Powder Alarm” Came to Shrewsbury

Here’s a link to something else I didn’t realize was on the web: video of my Road to Concord presentation in Shrewsbury in January 2018. Chapter 2 of the book begins in that town:While Gen. Gage was arranging to remove the gunpowder from Charlestown,...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Aug 2019

“Road to Concord” Runs through Watertown, 8 May

On Wednesday, 8 May, I’ll speak at the annual members’ meeting of the Historical Society of Watertown. My topic will be “The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War,” with special attention to Watertown’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 May 2019

“William Dawes’s Secret” in Roxbury, 7 April

On Sunday, 7 April, I’ll speak to the Jamaica Plain Historical Society and the Roxbury Historical Society about “William Dawes’s Secret.” Here’s our event description:William Dawes, Jr., is known today only as the other rider...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Apr 2019

A Mad March with the Junto and History Camp

The Junto Blog is hosting its annual March Madness brackets, a way to bring attention to articles, books, and (this year) digital projects in early American history.Boston 1775 was generously nominated in the category of “Blogs and Online Publications,”...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Mar 2019

‘“When John & Abigail Met George” in Cambridge, 14 Mar.

On Thursday, 14 March, I’ll speak at the Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site in Cambridge on the topic “When John & Abigail Met George: The Adamses' Earliest Encounters with General Washington.”Here’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Mar 2019

Page 1 of 7123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.