The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "sugar"

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Your search for posts with tags containing sugar found 56 posts

Waste Not Want Not: Molasses in Colonial America – More than a Waste Product?

By Mimi Goodall Molasses is the dark brown, sweet, sticky goo that is known today for its robust flavour. It gives a depth of taste to gingerbreads, toffees and fruitcakes. It does not have the immediate tongue-numbing sweetness of powder sugar; rather,...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Feb 2020

Mr. Shaw and Mr. Dumaresq

While Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., of New London, Connecticut, was speculating on the likelihood of war by buying gunpowder in the Caribbean in early 1775, as discussed here, he was still broadening his commercial network.In particular, he made a new contact...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2020

“Agree for the Powder to be brought Down to the Mole”

The start of the Revolutionary War changed New London merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr.’s business environment.For one thing, military supplies were much more valuable. On 25 Apr 1775 Shaw asked his connection in New York for “Five Hundred wt....
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2020

8 Intoxicating Objects from Nordiska Museet

A key part of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with schools in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Back in October, a group of 30 pupils from our Stockholm partner school Nacka Gymnasium joined our Swedish research team at Nordiska...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 29 Jan 2020

January 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “At the sign of the Sugar-loaf, Pound of Chocolate, and Tea Cannister.” In late 1769 or early 1770, Robert Levers opened a shop on Second Street in Philadelphia....
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Jan 2020

The Fear of Domination: Resistance Against Tyranny

The threat of continued oppression and an encroaching condition of slavery was central to the American colonists’ call for separation from Great Britain and... The post The Fear of Domination: Resistance Against Tyranny appeared first on Journal...

Addictive Cinema: 17 Intoxicating Films for the Holiday Season

One of the central and most rewarding aspects of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with sixth formers from schools in Utrecht, Oldenburg, Sheffield, and Stockholm. We’re all film-lovers, so Stephen suggested we assemble for our participating...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 16 Dec 2019

Sulfur of Saturn

The Roman Goddess Ops, 'sweet'-heart (and wife)of Saturn, Peter Paul Rubens c. 1630,“Abundance (Abundantia).” [1]Antonio Neri’s 1612 book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, devotes an entire chapter to making artificial gems....
From: Conciatore on 6 Dec 2019

October 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (October 3, 1769). “A Likely Negro LAD.” Nathan Frazier’s advertisement for “a very good assortment of Fall and Winter GOODS” ran once...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Oct 2019

How Magna Carta Influenced the American Revolution

In 1984, Ross Perot purchased a copy of the 1297 reissuance of the Magna Carta from the Brudenell family who had held the document... The post How Magna Carta Influenced the American Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The East India Company and Parliament’s Fateful Decision of 1767

India, the fabled land of rubies, diamonds, gold, tigers, and mystery, captured the imagination of the British people in the mid 1700s. Robert Clive... The post The East India Company and Parliament’s Fateful Decision of 1767 appeared first on Journal...

The Exception to “No Taxation Without Representation”

“I know not why we should blush to confess that molasses was an essential ingredient in American independence.”— John Adams[1] A one penny per... The post The Exception to “No Taxation Without Representation” appeared first...

New Intoxicants, Slavery, and Empire in the Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Dutch Atlantic

The history of new intoxicants is intimately connected to one of the darkest chapters in history: that on slavery, and the exploitative world economic system that sustained it. The increasing demand for consumables such as sugar, tobacco, and coffee in...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 5 Sep 2019

”Cheat them much as you can of ye Duties”

The Connecticut merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., shipped a lot of molasses to merchants in New York and Philadelphia. Since there was very little sugar cane grown around New London, he was buying that commodity in the Caribbean—mostly from French and...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Aug 2019

Sulfur of Saturn

The Roman Goddess Ops, 'sweet'-heart (and wife)of Saturn, Peter Paul Rubens c. 1630,“Abundance (Abundantia).” [1]Antonio Neri’s book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, devotes an entire chapter to making artificial gems. These...
From: Conciatore on 15 Apr 2019

February 26

GUEST CURATOR: Chloe Amour What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Boston Evening-Post (February 20, 1769). “Two Tierces of SUGAR of the first Quality.” Sugar was a sought-after consumer good, closely...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Feb 2019

The Molasses Act: A Brief History

The Molasses Act of 1733 levied a duty of six pence per gallon on foreign molasses imported into British colonies in North America. The... The post The Molasses Act: A Brief History appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Just imported, and to be sold by Mary Jackson”

After her business partner Robert Charles died, Mary Jackson stepped up her advertising from the Sign of the Brazen Head. Her main business was brass hardware and metals, both made in the shop and shipped in from Britain. For example, the Boston Evening-Post...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jan 2019

Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage

An interesting article. Apparently it was very common to add a variety of spices to chocolate, two of which was wine & sugar, known as "wine chocolate". Well worth reading.Keith.https://books.google.com.au/books?id=zwVS5gsJMUcC&pg=PA2006-IA32&lpg=PA2006-IA32&dq=tinned+iron+cooking+kettles&source=bl&ots=DjtFi_BDZo&sig=mgxuo6b_La6svPlgrBHaE2EKe1c&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjXtMeEnqreAhUUQH0KHZsXAYw4FBDoATADegQIBxAB#v=onepage&q=tinned%20iron%20cooking%20kettles&f=false
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Oct 2018

The Sugar Act: A Brief History

The Sugar Act of 1764 levied taxes on imports to British colonies in North America. In doing so, the act marked a change in... The post The Sugar Act: A Brief History appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.