The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "surgery"

Showing 1 - 20 of 63

Your search for posts with tags containing surgery found 63 posts

‘Dwale’: A Medieval Sleeping Drug in a Seventeenth-Century Receipt Book

Elizabeth K. Hunter As part of my research into early modern sleep disorders, I have been examining the wide variety of sleep remedies available in England at the time.  Browsing through the manuscript receipt collections at the Wellcome Library in London,...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Jan 2022

“Like a Collapsible Concertina”: Cosmetic Interventions in Fin-de-Siècle London

Jess Clark In the Fall of 2020, new reports revealed a marked increased in cosmetic procedures—surgery, injectables, and other dermatological treatments—over the course of the COVID pandemic. During the global crisis, some men and women of means have...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Sep 2021

Revisiting The Recipes of Cleopatra

Welcome to the August 2020 Edition of the Recipes Project! All month we will be revisiting posts from our archives and exploring the intersections of race, medicine, sexuality, and gender in recipes. First up: we’re delighted to re-post Jennifer...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Aug 2020

Barbers and Shaving in the Eighteenth Century

“It is the business of the barber to cut and dress hair, to make wigs and false curls, and to shave the beards of other men. In ancient times he used, also, to trim the nails; and even in the present day, in Turkey, this is a part of his employment”....
From: DrAlun on 8 Apr 2020

A Nose Found Wanting

Fictional Tales of the Reattachment of the Nose: A guest post by Stephanie Allen Sixteenth-century Nose Surgery.Wellcome Library In 1743 the French physician and writer Nicolas Andry argued ‘it is a very great deformity to have no nose at all, or...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 14 Nov 2018

Pain, poison, and surgery in fourteenth-century China

Yi-Li Wu It’s hard to set a compound fracture when the patient is in so much pain that he won’t let you touch him. For such situations, the Chinese doctor Wei Yilin (1277-1347) recommended giving the patient a dose of “numbing medicine”...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Sep 2017

‘This one is good’: Recipes, Testing and Lay Practitioners in Early German Print

By Tillmann Taape Having recently finished my doctoral thesis on the printed works of Hieronymus Brunschwig, which have previously featured on the Recipes Blog (here and here), I am delighted to contribute to this series of posts on testing and trying...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Aug 2017

Quacks & Hacks: Walter Freeman and the Lobotomobile

  On 12 November 1935, a Portuguese neurologist named Antonio Egas Moniz [below right] became the first individual to perform what would later be known as a lobotomy. Moniz’s work built upon that of the 19th-century Swiss psychiatrist, Gottlieb...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 14 Jun 2017

Finding your Feet

I am currently reading the diary of Richard Kay a doctor in Lancashire born in 1716 and practicing medicine, with this father, in the 1740s (you can find out more about Richard and his family here). Kay’s diary is interesting for a number of reasons...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 14 Jun 2017

Painful Operations: Removing Bladder Stones before Anesthesia

If you visit the Gordon Museum at Guy’s Hospital in London, you’ll see a small bladder stone—no bigger than 3 centimetres across. Besides the fact that it has been sliced open to reveal concentric circles within, it is entirely unremarkable...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 29 May 2017

A Famous Fistula

The Spanish Ambassador to James I of England suffered from an anal fistula which was common knowledge. John Reynolds’ imagined conversation between the late King Henry, Queen Anne, and Queens Mary and Elizabeth in 1624 includes the comment that...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 3 May 2017

Houses of Death: Walking the Wards of a Victorian Hospital

The following blog post relates to my forthcoming book THE BUTCHERING ART, which you can pre-order here.  Today, we think of the hospital as an exemplar of sanitation. However, during the first half of the nineteenth century,...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 24 Mar 2017

The Surgeon who Operated on Himself

Leonid Ivanovich Rogozov (pictured above and below right) knew he was in trouble when he began experiencing intense pain in lower right quadrant of his abdomen. He had been feeling unwell for several days, but suddenly, his temperature skyrocketed and...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 16 Jan 2017

16th-century Surgical Instruments: Forcipes denticulatae

Some of the ornate forceps in Jean Tagault’s De chirurgica institutione (Venice, 1544). I particularly like the little dragon heads on the ends of the handles. This copy is from Haverford’s Special Collections, call #R128.6 .T3 1544.Jean Tagault...
From: Darin Hayton on 16 Dec 2016

“We Have Conquered Pain!” The Uses & Abuses of Ether in History

The surgical revolution began with an American dentist and a curiously sweet-smelling liquid known as ether. Officially, ether had been discovered in 1275, but its stupefying effects weren’t synthesized until 1540, when the German botanist and chemist...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 30 Nov 2016

Medical Materials

A short while ago now I examined Alice Dolan’s excellent thesis on linen and its various roles in the life cycle. This got me thinking a bit more about the materials used in early modern medical recipes. We have seen
From: Early Modern Medicine on 23 Nov 2016

Dead Useful II: operating on the dead

Not too long ago I wrote a post about corpse medicine; the use of parts of the dead body in medicines. This could take the form of Stroking lumps and bumps with the hand of a hanged man, or including mummified flesh
From: Early Modern Medicine on 26 Oct 2016

To break or not to break (Part 2): From Cairo to Dordrecht

By Saskia Klerk, with Sietske Fransen In the eleventh chapter of his Steen-Stuck (Treatise on the Stone, 1637), Johan van Beverwijck related a story of an encounter in Dordrecht, the Dutch city where he was town physician. A man had shown him the pieces...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Aug 2016

Surgical Spectators

As we saw in the last post John Evelyn’s Kalendarium contains many references to health and sickness, both his own and his family members. His diary entries, written after the event from notes, show that he had a keen interest
From: Early Modern Medicine on 22 Jun 2016

Page 1 of 41234Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.