The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "syphilis"

Your search for posts with tags containing syphilis found 19 posts

‘Direful Attendants’: The Great Pox and Shame

‘The pestilent infection of filthy lust’  – William Clowes, A … treatise touching the cure of the disease called (morbus gallicus) (London, 1579). ‘[the great pox] has the direful Attendants of Shame, Reproach...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 28 Jul 2017

An unexpectedly fashionable career

If asked today to list fashionable careers, it is highly unlikely that any of us would include ‘syphilis specialist’ in our list. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the prevalence of the disease in British society and the ongoing...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 11 Jun 2017

Medical Fascinations, Human Lives: Hunter’s Syphilis Specimens

Should you visit The Hunterian Museum you can come face to face with victims of the great pox (syphilis). As you enter the main museum from the staircase, to the left hand side, on the topmost shelf of a cabinet containing a series of human specimens...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 12 Mar 2017

Syphilis: A Little Valentine’s Day Love Story

Photo Credit: The Royal College of Surgeons of England  We don’t know much about her. We don’t even know her name. What we do know is that the woman who wore the above prosthetic in the mid-19th century was suffering from a severe case...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 14 Feb 2017

Calling for Back Up

Daniel Turner was born in London, probably, on 18 September 1667. When he grew up he served a two-year apprenticeship under London surgeon Charles Bateman, and a five-year apprenticeship with Thomas Lichfield. In 1691 he joined the Company of Barber...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 25 Jan 2017

‘Hypochondriacal People’: Lives Haunted by the Pox

These dreadful Apprehensions have frequently possesst the Imaginations of some People that had taken the way to get the Pox, so, as to be soon perswaded they have it, whether it be so or no.John Marten, A Treatise of all the Degrees and Symptoms of the...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 15 Aug 2016

A (Very) Brief History of the Pox

In 1495 Europeans began to remark on the appearance of a new ‘terrifying, troublesome, and painful sickness’. Those afflicted suffered from aching bodies covered with ulcerations, and pustules which could ooze and stink. In its most horrific...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 21 Jul 2016

Recipes for Curing Syphilis from Colonial Mexico

By Heather R. Peterson, Assistant Professor of History University of South Carolina, Aiken While there is debate about the origins of syphilis, most Spanish doctors in the sixteenth century followed the physician Nicolas de Monardes in believing...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Jul 2016

Syphilis: The disease that came to stay

In 1495 a new pandemic swept across Europe; echoing his contemporaries’ fears Joseph Grünpeck, a German secretary, described it as a ‘terrifying, troublesome, and painful sickness’. Today identified as syphilis, this disease had...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 18 May 2016

Beauty Spots and French Pox

Katie Aske returns this week in her second guest blog post – the first one is here . This week Katie is discussing beauty spots!         The beauty spot is the trademark of the eighteenth-century’s powdered beauties, both male and female....
From: Early Modern Medicine on 4 Feb 2015

Seiseinyū and secrets: problems of recipe attribution in early modern Japan

In my last post, I looked at the problems faced by early modern Japanese doctors trying to figure out how to manufacture a new mercurial drug called seiseinyū, which had first appeared in the Chinese doctor Chen Sicheng’s Secret Record … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Jan 2015

The French Disease Reprise

Venus and Mercury with CupidNicolas Chaperon (1612-1655)A short time after finishing the seminary, newly ordained Catholic priest Antonio Neri entered employment with Don Antonio de' Medici at the Casino di San Marco. It was the beginning of a new century,...
From: Conciatore on 5 Jan 2015

Two early pamphlets on the French Pox

Joseph Grünpeck had long aspired to a better career than teaching Latin to students in Augsburg. So in 1496 he seized an opportunity to advertise his skills to the Bürgermeister of Augsburg and, more aspirationally, to Emperor Maximilian I who passed...
From: Darin Hayton on 22 Dec 2014

The Syphilitic Whores of Georgian London

People think I’m obsessed with syphilis, and maybe I am. But it’s only because of my recent indoctrination into 18th-century history by aficionados of the period, such as Lucy Inglis, Adrian Teal and Rob Lucas.  I can’t read 10 pages of a medical...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 3 Mar 2014

Don Antonio and the “French Disease”

Venus and Mercury with CupidNicolas Chaperon (1612-1655)A short time after finishing the seminary, newly ordained Catholic priest Antonio Neri entered employment with Don Antonio de' Medici at the Casino di San Marco. It was the beginning of a new century,...
From: Conciatore on 20 Dec 2013

Ray-Ban’s Predecessor? A Brief History of Tinted Spectacles

A recent conversation with Matthew Ward from History Needs You piqued my curiosity about a pair of spectacles in the Wellcome Collection [pictured left]. At first glance, you may think these oddly tinted glasses belong to the wardrobe department of a...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 21 Jun 2013

Pilulae Antipudendagriae—More Early DTC Marketing

Since the late 1990s direct-to-consumer (DTC) pharmaceutical marketing has become a standard part of society in the U.S. (perhaps also...
From: Darin Hayton on 16 Jun 2013

Suffering Venereal Disease in the Early Eighteenth Century

Lindsey Fitzharris (@ChirurgeonsAppr) recently discussed deformities caused by syphilis and the problems of prevention using early condoms (“Syphilis: A Love Story”). She also regularly tweets horrifying pictures of syphilis sufferers in the past,...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 5 Mar 2013

Beauty and the Pox

This blog post is really an addition to the Beautiful Healthy Bodies post from January. In that blog post I discussed the connections between physical appearance and disease. The blog started by discussing the connections between venereal disease, appearance...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 20 Feb 2013