The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "tank"

Your search for posts with tags containing tank found 8 posts

June 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (June 26, 1769). “Goldsmith and Jeweller, At the Sign of the Tea-pot, Tankard, and Ear-ring.” When Charles Oliver Bruff, a goldsmith...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Jun 2019

Inspiring a rivalship amongst the gentry: a letter to the papers, 1773

We’re just going to give you this letter, printed in the Reading Mercury on the 25th October 1773, in full. The author has quite clearly had his fill of the fawning sycophancy over the nobility in his morning paper. The article that sparked his...
From: All Things Georgian on 13 Nov 2018

What the 16th-century shipwreck found on the Kent coast can tell us about trade in Tudor England

Tudor warship, part of a manuscript presented to Henry VIII in 1546 by Anthony Anthony. British Library.http://www.kentonline.co.uk/whitstable/news/video-experts-uncover-rare-shipwreck-186389/https://theconversation.com/what-the-16th-century-shipwreck-found-on-the-kent-coast-can-tell-us-about-trade-in-tudor-england-100392
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 25 Jul 2018

Staved Tankards and Coopers

Gregory Theberge, at his 18th Century Material Culture Resource Center, put together an excellent slideshow of naval foodways in material culture. Through his research, with some backing from the American Revolution: Portraying the Sailor group on Facebook,...
From: British Tars, 1740-1790 on 29 Jan 2018

17th & 18th Century Copper Mugs & Tankards.

My thanks to Ward Oles for asking for this information. Beer Street 1751 England. Late 18th Century. English. The Ink Seller Mid 18th Century. French. Jan Josef Horemans the Elder 1694-1759 Flemish. Tavern Scene by Flemish artist David Teniers...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 21 Apr 2015

Film on YouTube: Reconstructing the Early Modern Domestic Interior

The film which I mentioned a few posts ago is now up on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUd_vBFlxs4 Part of the findings of the AHRC ‘Ways of Seeing the English Domestic Interior 1500-1700’ network, it explores how research into surviving...
From: Material Histories on 14 Nov 2014

Egypt's Lost Queens

Above: Nefertari, a Great Royal Wife of Ramesses the Great.Professor Joann Fletcher, Honorary Visiting Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of York, recently explored in a fascinating and engrossing television documentary the lives...
From: Conor Byrne on 30 Oct 2014

The Weapons of War

A look at weapons from Shakespeare’s era compared to those of World War I.  Firearms, artillery and new innovations… This series of blogs supports an exhibition at Hall’s Croft: ‘Cry Havoc! and let slip the dogs of war’...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 28 Oct 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.