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Your search for posts with tags containing tea found 1404 posts

Becoming Most Wanted

This month brings a new picture book about Samuel Adams and John Hancock: Most Wanted, written by Sarah Jane Marsh and illustrated by Edwin Fotheringham.That same team previously created Thomas Paine and the Dangerous Word. Fotheringham also illustrated...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Apr 2020

Never read once

I have a morning when what I have published is unwriting itself. I am working on a long-overdue article which should be a simple write-up of a plenary lecture given two years ago. In challenging myself, however, to think deeper and go further, I am realising...

“The Committee reserve all the printed Copies”

On Monday, 26 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today, the inhabitants of Boston once again gathered in Faneuil Hall for a town meeting. Technically, this was a continuation of the meeting they had adjourned the week before.To discourage various sorts of bad behavior,...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Mar 2020

Virtual Office Hours

This past week, several of the archaeologists partnered up with the Bibliographical Society of America to offer a webinar on the uses of AOR for remote teaching and research. Many thanks to Erin Schreiner for including us in the series, as well as for...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 26 Mar 2020

Corona Courses: My Top Ten Sources of Digital Content

So I have just finished converting my lecture courses into online formats: difficult to do midstream. A well-designed online course is a beautiful thing, but if a course is based on a more personal form of delivery and has to become virtual overnight...
From: streets of salem on 24 Mar 2020

Re: Kenneth M. Roemer Award: utopian studies cours

Quote:Kelly Mee Rich, an assistant professor and an award winner: (2015 | 2016) Diane Hunter Dissertation Prize and William Patrick Day Essay Contest >> the samples available for printing via custom writing company   Our university is preparing...
From: Web4Ren Forum (W4RF) on 20 Mar 2020

When Boston Approved the Short Narrative

On 19 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today, Bostonians gathered for another session of the town meeting they had begun a week before. Having finished electing men to the municipal offices, the people were now concentrating on how to respond to the Boston Massacre....
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2020

Tea in 18th Century America

Tea in 18th Century America by Kimberly K. Walters. (K. Walters at the Sign of the Gray Horse, 2019) Best-selling author Lucinda Brant offers enthusiastic... The post Tea in 18th Century America appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

New Salem

So now I am on my “spring break” with the reality of no return to my classrooms: everything is converted to digital/remote in this new corona community. This is ominous for me; I prefer to teach in person. I can rise to the occasion—I...
From: streets of salem on 17 Mar 2020

Around the Table: Events

This month on Around the Table, we will learn about the Folger Shakespeare Library’s tradition of teatime. Since renovations recently began at the Folger, the Library’s afternoon tea has also undergone some changes in order to keep the Folger...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Mar 2020

Pass Ye Remote: A Quest for Early Modern Entertainment Through Online Learning Resources

Welcome to Elizabethan England via the digital world! We’re lucky to have a range of exciting and innovative online resources at our disposal that make it possible to explore the entertainment and cultural activities of early modern England through...
From: Before Shakespeare on 16 Mar 2020

Crash course in Zoom

Today I’m going to go over the basics of Zoom, for those who are interested in or curious about using it for online teaching. I’m going to try not to talk too much, but I do want to walk you through the features, settings, and options before...
From: Cerisia Cerosia on 16 Mar 2020

The Boston Town Meeting Takes Action

On Tuesday, 13 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today, Boston took a couple of major steps in its official response to the Boston Massacre.The town had started its annual meeting the day before, reelecting the seven selectmen and then moving on to overseers of...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Mar 2020

Re: GGREN's winter 2009/2010 courses

[quote][size=10]Writing for women rulers in Quattrocento Italy: Antonio Cornazzano - is the fourth chapter of the collection of essays about women's contributions (social, cultural and literary aspects) with submissions and tasks to do my homework [url=http://www.mhra.org.uk/][color=#333333]course...
From: Web4Ren Forum (W4RF) on 3 Mar 2020

Re: Bochum: Master: Medieval and Renaissance Studi

[quote][size=10]Heritage protection, archives, museums, libraries, universities, publishing industry and media: most frequent places of work for graduates of this program with the research schedules of essayhave [url=https://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/mars/][color=#333333]and...
From: Web4Ren Forum (W4RF) on 27 Feb 2020

“A youth, son to Captain John Gore”

The older boy wounded by Ebenezer Richardson’s shot on 22 Feb 1770 was nineteen-year-old Samuel Gore.He appears here in his early-1750s portrait by John Singleton Copley, a detail from a painting now at Winterthur. Of course, this when Sammy was...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2020

Re: Selloutyoursoul.com: Ph.D. Destroyed My Life

[quote][size=10]Four PhD grads in the humanities tell their stories: 4 students agreed to share their stories with their names revealed. The TRaCE Project analyzed how students buy dissertation [url=http://gradadmissions.mit.edu/blog/browse/category/fear-and-failure][color=#333333]publications;...
From: Web4Ren Forum (W4RF) on 24 Feb 2020

Suffrage in Salem: a Big Election!

I always tell my students that history is not necessarily linear: movements and ideas move forward and then fall back and “progress”, however you choose to define it, is always a result of struggle. The struggle for women’s suffrage...
From: streets of salem on 22 Feb 2020

Re: Teaching the Early Modern Period (Dublin)

[quote][size=11]Why do we call it Early Modern Period but not the Renaissance? The difference is obvious, and the power of the intellect defines it via the curriculum/program reports, consequent guides with resommendations in thetermpapers [url=http://faculty.winthrop.edu/kosterj/engl201/earlymodernintro.htm][color=#333333]and...
From: Web4Ren Forum (W4RF) on 21 Feb 2020

Re: Osnabrück: MA Renaissance and Reformation stud

[quote][size=10]Handbook of individual intermittent writing in European libraries and files. In collaboration with the Research Center for Literature where I work in collaboration with the educators and scientific laboratory center to approve our strategies...
From: Web4Ren Forum (W4RF) on 20 Feb 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.