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Your search for posts with tags containing tea found 1340 posts

Review: Browne, Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean

Adam McNeil reviews Randy M. Browne's "Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean," which explores how enslaved Berbicians attempted to survive slavery in one of the most oppressive slave societies in the Americas.
From: The Junto on 4 Nov 2019

Guest Post: A (Pedagogically, Geographically, Historiographically) Vast Native History Course

  Today is the first day of Native American Heritage Month, and our guest post comes from Jessica Taylor, Assistant Professor of Oral and Public History, and Edward Polanco, Assistant Professor of Latin American History, both at Virginia Tech....
From: The Junto on 1 Nov 2019

How to Close-read a Sonnet in 12 Steps

Shut off distractions: turn off music and notifications. Put your phone away: I dare you. Try earplugs. You will need: a book (in print); two coloured pens or pencils; and access to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Accept no substitutes. Frame your...
From: Michael Ullyot on 29 Oct 2019

Introducing the CRKN Canadiana & Héritage Digital Collections

Who is CRKN? The Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) is a partnership of 79 Canadian universities and institutions dedicated to expanding digital content for the academic research and teaching enterprise in Canada. CRKN was formed in 1999 to increase...
From: Borealia on 23 Oct 2019

“The Americans Have Hoisted Their Standard of Liberty at Salem”

The skirmishes at Lexington and Concord are often considered the beginning of the American Revolution, a violent change in the controversy between Great Britain... The post “The Americans Have Hoisted Their Standard of Liberty at Salem” appeared...

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches...

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches wide, 224 full-color pages of maps, charts, and other illustrations of Boston history.I got a copy because I worked with editor Nancy S. Seasholes...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2019

“Battle of Daniels Farm” in Blackstone, 5-6 Oct.

This weekend, 5-6 October, there will be a Revolutionary War encampment and battle reenactment at the Daniels Farmstead in Blackstone (originally part of Mendon), Massachusetts. This event won’t recreate an actual battle. In fact, the scenario is...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Oct 2019

How to Remember Our Revolution

Here are a couple of interesting newspaper articles from this week.In a local section of the Boston Globe, Ben Jacques wrote about the stories of enslaved individuals in this region’s towns as preserved in old burying-grounds. This approach brings...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Sep 2019

Experience 18th century life at Daniel Boone Homestead.

Experience 18th century life at Daniel Boone HomesteadEvent: Heritage Day – An Eighteenth-Century ExperienceWhen: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. SaturdayWhere: Daniel Boone Homestead, 400 Daniel Boone Road, Exeter TownshipAdmission: $7 for...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 27 Sep 2019

Students Writing Letters, Students Reading Letters

Today at The Junto, Rachel Herrmann describes a letter-writing exercise for students
From: The Junto on 26 Sep 2019

The East India Company and Parliament’s Fateful Decision of 1767

India, the fabled land of rubies, diamonds, gold, tigers, and mystery, captured the imagination of the British people in the mid 1700s. Robert Clive... The post The East India Company and Parliament’s Fateful Decision of 1767 appeared first on Journal...

Constructing authentic student textual authority: Teach a text you don’t know

By Christina Riehman-Murphy, Marissa Nicosia, and Heather Froehlich Could a small recipe transcription project make space for student contributions to broader public knowledge? How could we facilitate our students situating themselves as part of a community...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Sep 2019

“What an unparallel’d Stock of Assurance & Self-Confidence”

In the fall of 1769, Boston’s non-importation controversy heated up. The town’s merchants, supported and pushed by the radical Whigs, had agreed not to order anything but necessities from Britain until Parliament repealed the Townshend duties.Boston’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Sep 2019

The Burning Church

For the last month, it seems like whenever I engaged in any form of social media I found myself looking at a primitive painting of a burning church. This image, by the nineteenth-century British expat artist John Hilling (1822-1894), who worked in Massachusetts...
From: streets of salem on 23 Sep 2019

Red Thread: A Co-curated Digital Site with Students

By Vera Keller, University of Oregon The Red Thread site grew out of an interdisciplinary, Honors College seminar, Global History of Color. I made colour the focus of a course for four reasons: it intersects with my own research into early modern experimentation...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Sep 2019

Reflections on Medieval Culture Through A Culinary Lens

Teaching the Medieval Feast Krista Murchison (Leiden University), @drkmurch Leiden University’s English Language and Culture BA is aimed at teaching about not just the literature and language of the English-speaking world (broadly defined) but also...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Sep 2019

Teaching Recipes as Pattern Recognition

By Rob Wakeman, Mount Saint Mary College In the throes of research, we often compile so much information we don’t know what to do with it. It’s not our fault, really. Working with recipe books takes us into so many wonderfully strange and...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Sep 2019

Bored Now: or, Captain Blood Plays Another Game of Solitaire

Maritime history has provided me with many satisfying and pleasurable moments since I started studying it seriously *cough* years ago, but there’s something a bit special about chairing a conference session where [a] all the speakers are running...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 10 Sep 2019

Recipe Books as Digital Feminist Archives

By Whitney Sperazza, Rochester Institute of Technology For sixteen weeks last fall, twelve University of Kansas students from a wide range of disciplines met at the Spencer Research Library to study, transcribe, and develop projects on one object from...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Sep 2019

The Exception to “No Taxation Without Representation”

“I know not why we should blush to confess that molasses was an essential ingredient in American independence.”— John Adams[1] A one penny per... The post The Exception to “No Taxation Without Representation” appeared first...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.