The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing teaching found 858 posts

Workshop on New England Slavery and Freedom, 26-27 Mar.

The Center for Reconciliation has announced a two-day workshop on “Interpreting Slavery and Freedom in New England,” to be held in Providence, Rhode Island, on 26-27 March.The organization says this event is designed to let participants:Explore...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Feb 2018

Colonial Comics “make history come alive in a potent time”

For the School Library Journal website, Johanna Draper Carlson reviewed the second volume of Colonial Comics: New England, focusing on the years 1750 to 1775. Carlson wrote:This anthology of 18 historical comic stories aims “to focus on the people...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2018

Curtain Lectures

It was Burns Night at Hamilton Hall last night, and my husband and I were charged with giving the Toast to the Lassies and Reply. After a week steeped in the Ploughman Poet, both of us were a bit uncomfortable with the very bawdy Burns in this year of...
From: streets of salem on 28 Jan 2018

The Digitization Dilemma

From my perspective, there are two digitization dilemmas inherent in the Peabody Essex Museum’s plan to relocate the Phillips Library outside of Salem, where it was created over a period of 200+ years. The first is my own dilemma: if the PEM had...
From: streets of salem on 25 Jan 2018

African-American History at the Phillips Library

On the occasion of the Martin Luther King holiday here in Salem and across the country, I thought I would highlight some sources for African-American history in the major repository for local history in our region, which is of course the PEM’s Phillips...
From: streets of salem on 15 Jan 2018

Public History

I have to admit that, having written this blog for seven years (unbelievable–seems like a month!), an enterprise I undertook because I wanted to indulge my own curiosity but also learn to write less for an academic audience and more for the general...
From: streets of salem on 10 Jan 2018

New semester, new class (and a golden oldie)

Today marks the first day of our second semester. It's my 10th semester at my current institution and my 32nd first day of the semester since I started teaching college classes in graduate school. (Nothing like doing that math to remind you that you have...
From: The Seacoast of Bohemia on 10 Jan 2018

Teaching Toolbox 2018

Do you have students work with timelines in class? Do you teach surveys, or long texts that have substantial narrative components that unfold over time? Have you used Timeline JS? I am developing an assignment that uses Timeline JS to recreate a...
From: Cerisia Cerosia on 9 Jan 2018

Over the next hill

Langden Brook, Trough of Bowland By Alexander P Kapp, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13402669 When your wheels are burning up the miles and you’re wearing down shoe leather, When your face is frozen in a smile and...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 8 Jan 2018

A broader purpose

Studying culture with numbers is not a special subfield of "DH"; it's a way to integrate different aspects of a liberal education. Continue reading →
From: The Stone and The Shell on 5 Jan 2018

Roald Dahl’s Stories for Adults

“I’ll bet you think you know this story. You don’t. The real one’s much more gory.” Roald Dahl wrote this about the tale of Cinderella in Revolting Rhymes, but it also applies to the stories he wrote for adults from 1944...
From: Michael Ullyot on 27 Dec 2017

Teaching the Twentieth Century

My portfolio career is such that among my teaching is an introductory module for Liverpool Hope University on twentieth century Europe. This is ‘flipped learning’ course, where the students access recorded lectures and course materials via...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 19 Dec 2017

Book Raffle: Hunt & Censer, The French Revolution and Napoleon

Hunt, Lynn and Jack R. Censer. The French Revolution and Napoleon: Crucible of the Modern World. New York. Bloomsbury Press, 2017. In conjunction with the Bloomsbury Press, Lynn Hunt, and Jack R. Censer, Age of Revolutions is proud...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Dec 2017

How to Start Your Thesis

Jerry Bannister Starting a graduate thesis is hard. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying, delusional, or one of those bizarre people who find it easy. December in Canada brings awful holiday specials on TV, complaints about freezing rain and, for those...
From: Borealia on 11 Dec 2017

Light into Dark: this year’s life of reading and watching ….

[A draft: which I will come back to in order to add comments to some of the books & pictures) Friends, I sometimes think that nothing I write anymore comes from an singular me, but it’s all somehow coming out of shared experiences, sometimes...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 8 Dec 2017

Student-Teachers and the Limits of Academic Freedom

The news that this has been a slightly more abysmal year than usual for academic jobs in history has provoked a lot of justified (if impotent) outrage online. An important part of this has centred on the “adjunctification” of the university...
From: memorious on 21 Nov 2017

Teaching English composition with early modern-style “commonplace books”

This fall, I have been trying out a number of strategies to integrate writing exercises, literary readings, and Special Collections visits in my undergraduate pedagogy. These experiments – that’s the word I prefer to use – allow the...
From: Vade Mecum on 20 Nov 2017

Connecting my Courses

This is that time in the semester when I am inevitably behind in my course content, racing towards the end of classes in early December: in one course I’m only in thirteenth century when I should be in the fourteenth; in another I’m in the...
From: streets of salem on 16 Nov 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.