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Your search for posts with tags containing technology found 209 posts

Renaissance Science – XLVIII

Using the simplest and widest definition as to what constitutes a scientific instrument, it is literally impossible to say who first created, devised, used a scientific instrument or when and where they did it. My conjecture would be that the first scientific...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 13 Jan 2023

The “Western Forts” of the 1783 Treaty of Paris

The Revolutionary War was formally ended by the Treaty of Paris in early 1783. Problems with compliance arose on both sides nearly immediately on... The post The “Western Forts” of the 1783 Treaty of Paris appeared first on Journal of the American...

The American Revolution(s): Digital Tools and Course Redesign in the Age of Covid-19

By Jason Daniels On March 25, 2020, Shadi Hamid suggested that the “Coronavirus killed the revolution.”[1] Several days later, Rebecca L. Spang asserted that it was misguided to assume that the Covid-19 crisis made people “crave normalcy”...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Nov 2022

Clément Ader, the théatrophone and the world’s first live-streaming

As a child in the first years of the 20th century the great American film director Preston Sturges lived in a stylish apartment in Paris with his mother. An earphone hung beside the fireplace. He tried it; it seemed dead. Then one evening a family friend...
From: Mathew Lyons on 27 Oct 2022

Renaissance science – XLV

70.8% of the earth’s surface is covered by the world ocean; we normally divide it up–Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, etc.– but they are all interconnected in one giant water mass. The world ocean Source: Wikimedia Commons Only...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 19 Oct 2022

Vision, Seeing Better, Seeing Further

In the normal blog post rotation, a book review should be due today. However, instead today’s post is a literature review, listing and describing books on the histories of the theories of vision, spectacles, and telescopes, with the latter coming first...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 21 Sep 2022

Renaissance science – XXXX

As we have seen in previous episodes, Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522–1605) was one of the leading natural historians of the sixteenth century. The first ever professor for natural history at the University of Bologna. Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522 – 1605)....
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Jul 2022

Eiffel and the Telling of Technological Stories

By Patrick De Oliveira Roland Barthes described the Eiffel Tower as “a universal symbol of Paris.”[1] Built to celebrate both the French Revolution’s centennial and the nineteenth century’s sweeping industrial transformations, the Tower can...
From: Age of Revolutions on 23 May 2022

Benjamin Franklin, Fireman

Benjamin Franklin was a man of many talents and titles. He was a printer, writer, scientist, inventor, politician, diplomat, and philosopher, among other things.... The post Benjamin Franklin, Fireman appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Thaddeus Kosciuszko: “Patron Saint of West Point”

In Douglas S. Freeman’s biography of Robert E. Lee, he noted: Corps activities took a certain amount of Lee’s time that winter. Kosciuszko was... The post Thaddeus Kosciuszko: “Patron Saint of West Point” appeared first on Journal of the American...

Christmas Trilogy 2021 Part 2: He was the author of rambling volumes on every subject under the sun?

The acolytes of Ada Lovelace are big fans of Sydney Padua’s comic book, The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage (Penguin, 2015). One can not deny Padua’s talent as a graphic artist, but her largely warped (she claims mostly true) account...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 26 Dec 2021

Review: Surveying in Early America

BOOK REVIEW: Surveying in Early America: The Point of Beginning, An Illustrated History by Dan Patterson and Clinton Terry (Cincinnati, OH: University of Cincinnati Press, 2021)... The post Review: Surveying in Early America appeared first on Journal...

This Week on Dispatches: David M. Griffin on the Brooklyn Line Forts of 1776

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews architect and JAR contributor David M. Griffin on his research to determine the possible appearance and... The post This Week on Dispatches: David M. Griffin on the Brooklyn Line Forts of 1776...

Call for papers: Early modern science, technology, and institutions

The University of Manchester Conference to be held at the University of Manchester Date: May 13, 2022 Conference title: Early modern science, technology, and institutions Keynote speakers: Debin Ma (University of Oxford) and David...
From: Economic Growth in History on 13 Oct 2021

What Were the Brooklyn Line of Forts in 1776?

The planned capture of New York City in 1776 by British forces set the stage for what was to become the largest battle of... The post What Were the Brooklyn Line of Forts in 1776? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Renaissance Science – XX

The term the Republic of Letters is one that one can often encounter in the history of Early Modern or Modern Europe, but what does it mean and to whom does it apply? Republic comes from the Latin res publica and means res “affair, matter, thing” publica “public,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 6 Oct 2021

Guns on Mount Defiance

Discussions about the American evacuation of Mount Independence and Fort Ticonderoga on the night of July 5, 1777 frequently address the question: could shot... The post Guns on Mount Defiance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

I do wish people wouldn’t post things like this

I stumbled across the following image on Facebook, being reposted by people who should know better, and it awoke my inner HISTSCI_HULK: I shall only be commenting on the first three images, if anybody has any criticism of the other ones, they’re...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 3 Sep 2021

The seventeenth-century Chinese civil servant from Cologne 

From its very beginnings the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) was set up as a missionary movement carrying the Catholic Religion to all corners of the world. It also had a very strong educational emphasis in its missions, carrying the knowledge of Europe...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 4 Aug 2021

Renaissance Science – XV

Vitruvius’ De architectura was by no means the only book rediscovered from antiquity that dealt with the construction and use of machines and the Renaissance artist-engineers were also not the only authors producing new texts on machines. In this...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 28 Jul 2021

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