The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing the craft found 110 posts

Alice Clark 100 Reading Group: ‘Introductory’

This post is part of our #AliceClark100 Online Reading Group. In it Susan D. Amussen offers some reflections on the opening ‘Introductory’ chapter of The Working Life of Women in the Seventeenth Century. Susan is a Professor of History at...
From: the many-headed monster on 8 Apr 2019

A Biography of Alice Clark (1874-1934)

To kick off our #AliceClark100 Online Reading Group – marking 100 years since the publication of her groundbreaking Working Life of Women in the Seventeenth Century – Tim Stretton provides some valuable context in this short biography of Alice...
From: the many-headed monster on 3 Apr 2019

Alice Clark’s *Working Life of Women in the 17th Century* at 100: An Online Reading Group

Mark Hailwood The conditions under which the obscure mass of women live and fulfil their duties as human beings, have a vital influence upon the destinies of the human race… Alice Clark, 1919 It was this conviction that drove Alice Clark to write...
From: the many-headed monster on 21 Mar 2019

Histories of London, 1640s to 1660s: Continuities and Turning Points

[Richard Bell is CMRS Career Development Fellow in Renaissance History at Keble College, Oxford. In this post he outlines his response to the questions raised in the opening post on Integrating Histories of London, focusing on continuities and turning...
From: the many-headed monster on 17 Jan 2019

Histories of London, c.1650-1800: Institutions, Work, Poverty and Crime

[In this post, Brodie Waddell sets out another response to the issues raised in the opening post on Integrating Histories of London.] The history of early modern London cannot be written without the people who are often neglected in sweeping national...
From: the many-headed monster on 14 Jan 2019

Histories of London, c.1500-1650: Space, Narratives and Numbers

[Dr Jennifer Bishop is a College Lecturer at Peterhouse College, Cambridge. In this post, she outlines her response to the questions raised in the opening post on Integrating Histories of London, focusing on the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.]...
From: the many-headed monster on 10 Jan 2019

Integrating Histories of London, c.1500-18

[Dom Birch, Esther Brot and Jonah Miller are doctoral students at King’s College London. In this post, they set out why and how they think the diverse histories of early modern London can be integrated with each other and with larger national narratives,...
From: the many-headed monster on 7 Jan 2019

Language-learning for historians of early modern England

[This guest post comes from John Gallagher of the University of Leeds. He also can be found on twitter talking about language, education and mobility.] In an English-Italian phrasebook written in 1578, one character complained about the rudeness of the...
From: the many-headed monster on 27 Nov 2018

Seventeenth-century England: A Symposium to celebrate Professor Bernard Capp’s 50 Years at Warwick

Laura Sangha On Saturday 20 October I had the great pleasure of returning to my alma mater to attend ‘Seventeenth-Century England’, a symposium to mark and celebrate Professor Bernard Capp’s fifty years at the University of Warwick....
From: the many-headed monster on 5 Nov 2018

The Power of Petitioning in Seventeenth-Century England: The Long Road to a New Project

Brodie Waddell How can people without official political power push the authorities to act? Historically, one of the most common tactics was to create a petition or supplication. Even today, every year hundreds of thousands of ordinary citizens sign e-petitions...
From: the many-headed monster on 17 Sep 2018

The Living, the Dead and the Very Very Dead: Ethics for Historians

Laura Sangha Students of history are no strangers to ethics. Indeed, universities have ethics committees and policies which cover instances where the conduct of research involves the interests and rights of others. For historians, this usually means that...
From: the many-headed monster on 17 Aug 2018

Historical Fiction and the ‘Pastness’ of the Way People Think

Mark Hailwood Once upon a time, I wrote a blog post about the story telling techniques that historians use in their writing. This was not a long time ago, and nor was it far away – you can read it here in fact. Inspired by the ‘Storying...
From: the many-headed monster on 16 Aug 2018

“As I Went Forth One Summer’s Day”: Putting the Story in Early Modern History

Mark Hailwood Twas the night before Christmas, in the year 1681, and one Soloman Reddatt was drinking in the Nag’s Head in Reading, with his sister, Elizabeth, and a friend, George Parfitt, when, at around 9pm, their sociability was disturbed by...
From: the many-headed monster on 15 Aug 2018

Creative history is … ?

Laura Sangha This post was inspired by the conversations, presentations, exhibitions and performances at ‘Creative Histories’, Bristol Zoo, 19-21 July 2017. The conference was organised by Will Pooley, and you can read more of the posts that...
From: the many-headed monster on 14 Aug 2018

A ‘Creative Histories’ Mini-Series

Mark Hailwood & Laura Sangha Over the past couple of years the pair of us have had the pleasure of being involved in a series of events around the theme of ‘creative histories’, curated by the fertile brains behind the Storying the Past...
From: the many-headed monster on 13 Aug 2018

A Page in the Life

Brodie Waddell Long before writing became a skill that every child was expected to learn, all sorts of people still scribbled away. Some men and women did so for mostly practical reasons – keeping track of their finances, corresponding with distant...
From: the many-headed monster on 23 Mar 2018

Striking parallels, c.1700 and 2018 (part 2)

Brodie Waddell I know very little about modern labour relations beyond what I’ve learned over the past few weeks as a lecturer on strike. However, I do know a fair bit about labour relations between about 1550 and 1750. In my previous post, I talked...
From: the many-headed monster on 21 Mar 2018

Striking parallels, c.1700 and 2018 (part 1)

Brodie Waddell I’m not a labour relations expert, nor a union organiser, nor a seasoned activist. I am, however, a lecturer who has been on strike over the past few weeks alongside tens of thousands of other university staff. As historian of, roughly,...
From: the many-headed monster on 19 Mar 2018

‘Clothes to go handsome in’: what did the seventeenth-century rural poor think about the clothes that they wore?

This guest post comes from Danae Tankard, a Senior Lecturer in Social and Cultural History at the University of Chichester. It follows on from Mark’s recent post on ‘Material Culture from Below’ and further demonstrates the potential...
From: the many-headed monster on 8 Aug 2017

Material Culture ‘from Below’

Mark Hailwood I went to a conference, and all I got was this lousy blog post. That’s right, this is one of those blog posts thought up whilst staring pensively out of a train window on a journey home from three days at a wonderfully stimulating...
From: the many-headed monster on 1 Aug 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.