The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "thought"

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Your search for posts with tags containing thought found 53 posts

Royalist Republicans in the United Provinces

The cover of an excellent book. I have just finished reading Helmer Helmers’ The Royalist Republic (CUP, 2015), which offers a profound challenge to received views of Anglo-Dutch relations during the seventeenth century, in particular the idea...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Dec 2018

‘Garden centres must become the Jacobin Clubs of the new Revolution’

Must they? Ian Hamilton Finlay is the author of this startling command. It is one of his Detached Sentences on Gardening (1980-1998): Finlay was a concrete poet and artist who developed a now-renowned garden by the name of Little Sparta, just to the south...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 20 Nov 2018

Crisis and Renewal with Aristotle and Machiavelli

Honoré Daumier, L’Équilibre européen (1866) I’m just on the train back from the ESHPT conference on ‘Crisis and Renewal in the History of Political Thought’ in Heidelberg and, as so often happens after an event...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 13 Oct 2018

Translation Matters

Some excellent books on early modern translation. I work at the Foreign Services Desk of a news agency and I moonlight as an intellectual historian of early modern Britain. Both jobs have been fostering my obsession with translation. Part of my day...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 7 Sep 2018

Early Modern Political Thought and Twenty-First-Century Politics

I love Newcastle and the Lit&Phil, and this workshop on Early Modern Political Thought and Twenty-First-Century Politics was probably one of the most fun public history events I have yet participated in. Rachel Hammersley managed to get together a...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 2 Jun 2018

Interview: Sarah Jane Marsh

Today, May 29, 2018, Disney Hyperion is introducing young readers to the American Revolution with Thomas Paine and the Dangerous Word, an eighty-page picture... The post Interview: Sarah Jane Marsh appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Translating Cultures – Workshop at the Duke August Library, 26/27 June

An eighteenth-century German edition of Algernon Sidney’s Discourses Concerning Government (1683) If you are an early modernist interested in translation, print and the book trade in Europe and you can make it to Wolfenbüttel this summer, drop...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Mar 2018

Leviathan in the Library

I am preparing the first of a brace of talks that I am to give this week. They are on a rather different topics from each other but they are both to be presented in the same location, the ball-room-like expanse of the Upper Library of Christ Church, Oxford....

The eloquent ideologists of Germany’s New Right

Thugs in combat boots they’re certainly not. The people Volker Weiss writes about are more of the nerdy variety, he told me over the phone a while back. They know their Greek and Latin, but that doesn’t necessarily make them harmless. It’s...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 2 Apr 2017

An exile’s home: Algernon Sidney in Nérac

So, that’s the castle in France where the English republican Algernon Sidney (1623-1683) spent roughly five years of his exile during the Restoration period: le château de Nérac in the capital of the Pays d’Albret in the south...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 17 Mar 2017

Uncertainty and the post-truth society

Niccolò Machiavelli knew about the importance of appearances. The word ‘Brexit’ entered the Oxford English Dictionary for the first time this month, only weeks after Donald Trump was elected as the next president of the United States...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 18 Dec 2016

‘At Christmas we banquet, the rich with the poor’: Christmas Dinner in Tudor & Stuart England

Mark Hailwood Christmas dinner is undoubtedly one of the most popular Yuletide rituals in Britain today – but what is its history? If you like, as any good historian would, to have a bit of historical context up your sleeve to bore your relatives...
From: the many-headed monster on 14 Dec 2016

September 3

What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (September 3, 1766).“BUTTON GWINNETT.” It’s Founders Chic day at the Adverts 250 Project! Today’s advertisement was inserted in the Georgia Gazette...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Sep 2016

Political Thought in Times of Crisis, 1640-1660 – Symposium, 1-3 Dec

Sponsored by the Folger Institute Center for the History of British Political Thought, Washington, US. Was the mid-seventeenth-century crisis in Britain and Ireland essentially one aspect of a broader “global” crisis? How might scholars theorize...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 27 Jul 2016

On periodisation: religion, early modernity, and ‘The Reformation’

Jonathan Willis In some ways, ‘The Reformation’ (I’ll explain the excessive punctuation in a bit) may seem like an odd contribution to a blog mini-series on periodisation.  After all, surely ‘The Reformation’ was a thing,...
From: the many-headed monster on 3 May 2016

Experimental Philosophy and Early Modern Ethics: Turnbull and Fordyce

Alberto Vanzo writes … Experimental philosophy is often portrayed as an exciting or controversial new development in philosophy. Yet, some have claimed that the practice of experimental philosophy is traditional and that it ‘began to flourish’...

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 96

Thought, with good cause thou lik’st so well the night, Since kind or chance gives both one livery; Both sadly black, both blackly darkened be, Night barred from sun, thou from thy own sun’s light. Silence in...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 3 Mar 2016

Being a refugee

Woodcut illustration from The Isle of Pines (1668). It’s weird to be writing a book about English republican exiles in the seventeenth century while thousands of refugees from the Middle East and Africa make their way to Europe every day. I’ve...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 14 Feb 2016

Charles Clark: UK Pun Champion, 185

For the past 8 years, there has been an award for the funniest joke at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. This year, the prize went to Darren Walsh for his one liner “I just deleted all the German names off my phone. It’s Hans free.”...
From: Finding Charles Clark on 27 Aug 2015

Food for Thought III: A Literary Critic and the Carnivalesque

Mark Hailwood This is the third and final post in a series introducing some key theoretical concepts through the history of food and drink (see here for the first, here for the second). The previous post concluded on Pierre Bourdieu’s point that...
From: the many-headed monster on 13 Apr 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.