The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "tobacco"

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Your search for posts with tags containing tobacco found 33 posts

A New Tavern Opened in Brunswick Town

Archeologists from East Carolina University announced that they are exploring the site of an eighteenth-century tavern in Brunswick Town, North Carolina, once capital of that colony. The building was located by a student using ground-penetrating radar....
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2019

April 7

GUEST CURATOR: Bryant Halpin What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (April 7, 1769).“TOBACCO PIPES.” In this advertisement John Allman and Company sold tobacco pipes. Also in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Apr 2019

Tales from the Archives: Tobacco Smoke Enemas in Eighteenth-Century Domestic Medicine

In September 2018, The Recipes Project will be six years old. We’ve had a whole lotta blogging over the years. Today, I’m pleased to present our 675th post — a revisit of our most popular posts: Katherine Allen’s reflections on…...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Jun 2018

18: The Year of Macbeth

Anne-Marie Duff and Rory Kinnear in the National Theatre’s Macbeth Macbeth is known as Shakespeare’s unluckiest play. For generations it has been referred to by the superstitious as “The Scottish Play” because even speaking its...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 1 Feb 2018

The Chesapeake Tobacco Economy - Indentured Servants & Angry Native Americans

The Chesapeake was immensely hospitable to tobacco cultivation. Profit-hungry settlers often planted tobacco, before they planted corn; seeking fields to plant tobacco, these new immigrants plunged farther away from the river valley and closer to the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 4 Jun 2017

GUEST CURATOR: Nicholas Sears What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts...

GUEST CURATOR: Nicholas Sears What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (November 28, 1766).“Scotch Snuff.” This advertisement showcased a public vendue held at an “Auction-Room in Queen Street”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Nov 2016

Women taking power in Shakespeare’s plays

Glenda Jackson as King Lear 2016 seems to have been characterised by women staging a takeover of traditional male roles, at least as far as Shakespeare is concerned. While planning this post I was hoping to be able to link this trend to the election...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 16 Nov 2016

The Alchemist at the RSC

Ben Jonson’s 1610 play The Alchemist was playing in Stratford-upon-Avon this summer (until 6 August) before transferring to The Barbican from September. Set against the backdrop of a great plague epidemic which has seen the wealthy abandon...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 12 Oct 2016

Lowell Lecture Series on Archeology in Boston

The Lowell Lecture Series organized by the Paul Revere House and hosted by Old South Meeting House is under way. This year”s theme is archeology, and these talks are still coming up.Tuesday, 13 September, 6:30-7:30 P.M.Dig Boston: How, When, and...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Sep 2016

June 15

What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Virginia Gazette (June 13, 1766).“The unwary purchaser may make use of this to prevent their being taken in.” Throughout the eighteenth century many advertisers emphasized their...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Jun 2016

Creating Cures in Early America

Guest Post by Rachel Winchcombe In early modern Europe life expectancy was low. A male property owner living in fifteenth-century England would not expect to live past his thirty third birthday, whilst life expectancy in eighteenth-century Paris could...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 18 May 2016

All’s Well That Ends Well @ShakespeareatTF – A Review

A review by Thomas Tyrrell (Cardiff University) During a lecture on the medieval sources of Shakespeare’s All’s Well That Ends Well, Professor Elizabeth Archibald digressed so far as to recommend the current production at the Tobacco Factory...
From: Cardiff Shakespeare on 1 May 2016

The Life and Death of David Murray

On 10 Apr 1755, shoemaker David Murray and Mary Fitzgerald married at the New South Meetinghouse, having announced their intention the previous October. Soon afterward, Boston employee Robert Love visited them at their home on Blowers’s Wharf in...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Nov 2015

An Update On Tinder Tubes.

It seems that I may be right about tinder tubes being pipe lighters. I found this image with explanation. Rural French pipe-smoker’s outfit – late 19th Century. I think that the block on the tube is a steel, & you can see the end cap...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 22 Oct 2015

Explaining A Good Question

My experiment in teaching students to ask questions has run headlong into yet another hurdle. Previously I had been persuaded that the students would benefit from an example, so I brought in an old book and tried to show them how I would formulate some...
From: Darin Hayton on 8 Feb 2015

Thieves, Strumpets, Tobacco, and the French: A Glimpse into the British Atlantic World, ca1760

On this date, October 10, in 1760, William Fauntleroy appears to have been a but cranky.  A planter and merchant in Tidewater Virginia, he took a few minutes to pen an epistolary snapshot of life in the 18th-century British world in a fascinating letter...
From: Revolutionary Thoughts on 10 Oct 2014

The Great Georgian Snuff Debate

We’re used to debates about tobacco. In any given week it’s a fair bet that smoking/cigarettes/e-cigarettes will be food for editorial thought. What the UK’s Guardian recently called a ‘global epidemic of tobacco’ is, according to their...
From: DrAlun on 15 Sep 2014

The Tempest (Gloucestershire Youth Players) @ The Tobacco Factory, Bristol

Gloucestershire Youth Players has been touring productions of Shakespeare for nine years, and its 2014 production of The Tempest marks the first time the ensemble has used a professional theatre, concluding its tour (which also took in the Dell in Stratford-upon-Avon)...
From: The Bardathon on 29 Jul 2014

Sickness Personified: Clandestine Remedies from Colonial Yucatán (Part 1)

By R.A. Kashanipour “I curse you, little seizures! Whose erupting pox are you? Eruptions on the head and body, open eruptions, internal eruptions, fiery eruptions…” [1] So begins a highly ritualized remedy for fever, eruptions, and seizures from...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Dec 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.