The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "tomahawks"

Your search for posts with tags containing tomahawks found 15 posts

Axes in New France: Part 111 Casse-têtes (French Tomahawks)

https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.109/tnx.0f5.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Axes-in-New-France-Part-3-Casse-t%C3%AAtes-French-Tomahawks.pdf
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Jan 2020

Axes in New France: Part 1 The Biscayan Axe

https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.109/tnx.0f5.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Axes-in-New-France-Part-1-The-Biscayan-Axe.pdf
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Jan 2020

Tools Made from Rasps or Files

Tools Historic Maritime I (1607-1676): The First Colonial Dominion The Davistown Museum - Tools Made from Rasps or Files 31-Jul-14 Blacksmiths re-use worn or damaged files and rasps by making them into something else. All the tools listed here are also...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 Sep 2019

The Whetting Stone.

18th century whetstones Nottingham University Museum Photo Robin Aldworth. The Whetting Stone. Whet means sharp, so by definition if a blade has been sharpened, it has been whetted. If you are sharpening a blade, then you are whetting that blade. Keith....
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 31 Oct 2017

Capt. Keith & family betrayed & made prisoners by the American Indians

Capt. Keith struggles as he is attacked by two Indians one of whom has grabbed his rifle while another Indian stands with his tomahawk raised above the Captain’s head. The Captain’s wife with her child in her arms reaches up towards her husband...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 Dec 2016

The dance of the calumet of the sun

Depiction of the dance probably performed by the Illinois to strengthen peace between the tribes. The Calumet, a large pipe, was usually presented to the honoured guest. The tribe surrounds the circle in which two men dance with arrows above their heads;...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 27 Oct 2016

Settlers. Tools, weapons, and carrying.

Settlers. Tools, weapons, and carrying.Some people I know choose the actual settlement scenario for historical trekking events. But I wonder just how much thought goes into such an event beforehand. Settlers traveled by various means, by foot,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Feb 2013

Mopoke’s Stock & Trade (Australia).

Mopoke’s Stock & Trade (Australia).I would like to introduce you all to a new Australian trader, Mick Humphrey. Mick is a good friend of mine and he is based in Victoria. Please bear in mind that Mick has to order this gear from overseas, therefore...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Jan 2013

From the Horse's Mouth. A New Australian Trader!!!

Just thought I would give you all the heads-up early. A good friend of mine and fellow 18th century living historian is starting his own Trading Company here in Australia. To start off he will be selling just flint, steel and tinderbox kits and hand...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 6 Dec 2012

The Tomahawk and Its Weight.

Recently I have received several enquiries about the weight of a trade axe/tomahawk. I had not realised that some popular brands of “off the shelf” tomahawks weighed in at about 1 kilogram! Personally I think this weight for a tomahawk/belt axe is...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 3 Sep 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.