The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "tower"

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Your search for posts with tags containing tower found 105 posts

Lady Katherine Grey

My article about Lady Katherine Grey, younger sister of the executed Jane and a claimant to the throne of Elizabeth I (reigned 1558-1603), is available online at Team Queens. You can read it here: https://teamqueens.org/2021/08/12/lady-katherine-grey-tudor-heiress/
From: Conor Byrne on 12 Sep 2021

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Four

We have now reached the final part of the story and just in case you missed any, the previous parts can be found by clicking these links – Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. In this final part we return again to George and his wife Mary. In 1817 and they went...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Oct 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Three

We begin the third part of George’s life in March 1794, but just in case you missed the earlier parts, click on the highlighted links to read part 1 and part two . George had been busy studying and performing at the New Theatre Royal, still under...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 Sep 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Two

Today we continue with the story of George’s life, but if you missed last weeks and would like to catch up, just click on this highlighted link. Charlotte Papendiek with her eldest son Frederick – a drawing by Thomas Lawrence, 1789, Metropolitan...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Sep 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part One

Over the next few weeks we are having a slight change to the usual weekly format in so much as I’m going to take a fairly detailed look at one person in particular and tell you a little about his life story and that of his family, so please do tune...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Sep 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Jeff Dacus on the “Tower of Victory” at the Siege of Fort Watson

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Jeff Dacus on how Light Horse Harry Lee and Francis Marion were able to successfully capture... The post This Week on Dispatches: Jeff Dacus on the “Tower of...

Tower of Victory

As far back as the eleventh century B.C. attackers confronted by fortified cities and towns, castles, and forts, used siege towers to elevate their... The post Tower of Victory appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Tapping America’s Wealth to Fund the Revolution: Two Good Ideas that Went Awry

“Unless some great and capital change suddenly takes place,” Gen. George Washington wrote from Valley Forge on December 23, 1777,[1] to Henry Laurens, the... The post Tapping America’s Wealth to Fund the Revolution: Two Good Ideas that...

One Word, Two Covenanters and the Killing Times of 1685 #History #Scotland #Newmilns

One word can make all the difference when it comes to identifying the Covenanter martyrs of the Killing Times of 1685. If there is a transmission error in the evidence of a name, then one dead Covenanter can easily become two. Was that the case with John...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 10 Jul 2019

Shakespeare on the centenary of the Armistice

Beyond the Deepening Shadow, Tower of London Nov 2018 The progress of the 1914-1918 Great War has been closely followed in the UK over the past four years. Radio and TV programmes, and major events have ensured we could not forget the dreadful events...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 Nov 2018

The British Army of the Killing Times in the Winter of 1685 #History #Scotland

  On 10 December, 1685, General William Drummond wrote a memorial of the winter quarters appointed for the King’s Scottish Army, aka., the British Army, until further orders. The modern regiments descended from these regiments are @scots_guards,...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 23 Sep 2018

Sir Walter Raleigh’s 400th anniversary

Sir Walter Raleigh, National Portrait Gallery 2018 marks 400 years since the death by execution of one of the most remarkable men of Shakespeare’s period, Sir Walter Raleigh. Raleigh is popularly known for bringing back the first potatoes from Virginia,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 4 Apr 2018

Football with a Head, Newmilns Tower and the Killing Times #History #Scotland

The New Statistical Account on Newmilns Tower in the Killing Times of 1685: ‘This was Captain [John] Inglis’s head-quarters when in the district. In one of the expeditions of Inglis’ troop [of dragoons led by Cornet Peter Inglis] in...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 30 Mar 2018

The Blue Tower

"The Blue Tower" Jozef Linnig 1868. (click image to enlarge) There are three known facilities where priest Antonio Neri worked as an alchemist formulating glass in the early seventeenth century; in Florence, Pisa and Antwerp. If he did work elsewhere,...
From: Conciatore on 20 Sep 2017

The Books and the Wall

I read, in past days, that the man who ordered the construction of the nearly infinite Wall of China was that First Emperor, Shih Huang Ti, who likewise ordered the burning of all the books before him. That the two gigantic operations—the five or...

Elizabeth St John and The Lady of the Tower

The highlight of this year’s Swindon Festival of Literature for me was meeting Elizabeth St. John. Elizabeth travelled from her 21st century home in California to her ancestral home at Lydiard Park to deliver a sell out talk about her book...
From: Good Gentlewoman on 22 May 2017

19 May 1536: Anne Boleyn's Execution

We have no way of knowing whether Anne Boleyn was greeted by warm sunshine and birdsong as she took her final steps out of the queen's apartments and towards the scaffold within the Tower of London. Likewise, it is impossible to say whether the queen...
From: Conor Byrne on 19 May 2017

Great Tom the Christ Church Belle: Valentine’s Day 1816

Great Tom is the name of the bell which hangs in Tom Tower at Christ Church, one of the colleges at Oxford University. The following print was produced for Valentine’s Day in 1816, playing on the names, with two Oxford men fleeing underneath Great...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Feb 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.