The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "trade"

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Your search for posts with tags containing trade found 399 posts

June 15

GUEST CURATOR: Joseph Vanacore What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A SLOOP of 84 tons, with all her stores.” I found Abraham Barker’s advertisement in the June 15, 1772, issue of the Newport Mercury very interesting....
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Jun 2022

A Salem Slaver

It’s beautiful here in Salem and I had a very colorful post all lined up for you: gardens, the arts festival, blue trees, doors of many colors, cats, my lady’s slippers, simple pleasures. But no, I had to read a letter from a son in a distant port...
From: streets of salem on 6 Jun 2022

18th century trade cards for London book sellers

For those readers who are familiar with All Things Georgian, you will more than likely know of my passion for trade cards and the tiny clues they offer about the lives their former owners. Today we’re going to take a look at just a few of the booker...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Jun 2022

Rhode Island Acts to Prevent an Enslaved Family from Being Transported to the South

The American Revolution spurred the world’s first significant movement to abolish slavery and the African slave trade.[1] Before then, there was virtually no antislavery... The post Rhode Island Acts to Prevent an Enslaved Family from Being Transported...

The case of the poor straw-hat-makers

Title: The case of the poor straw-hat-makers, in the counties of Hartford, Bedford, Buckingham, &c. Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1720?] Catalog Record File 652 A3 C337 720 Acquired March 2021
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 28 Apr 2022

The case of the makers of and dealers in cards and dice

Title: The case of the makers of and dealers in cards and dice. Published: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1718?] Catalog Record File 652 A3 C337 718 Acquired March 2021
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 7 Apr 2022

Chocolate’s Dark Secret: Valentine’s Day and the Abstraction of Love

By Chris Magra Valentine’s Day has a long history that dates back to antiquity, but no one celebrates the ancient Roman festival of the Lupercalia, or the secret marriages that took place under Emperor Claudius over 1,000 years ago. People put less...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Feb 2022

February 5

What was advertised in colonial America 250 years ago today? “London Book Store.” Earlier this week, the Adverts 250 Project featured an advertisement that bookseller Henry Knox placed in the Boston Evening-Post.  In addition to listing various genres...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Feb 2022

When Nixon went to China and Life Magazine came to Salem

For some reason, I’ve been going through the archives of Life magazine over the last month or so: it started with the photographs, and then I had to read the stories too. Life seems like it was a perfect mix of news and popular culture: we don’t...
From: streets of salem on 4 Feb 2022

Trusting the Grocer

By Benjamin R. Cohen A word for the grocer, because before the recipe is the ingredient. To get the ingredient, you either grow it yourself or buy it at a store. Most of us buy it at a store. The grocer is the supplier. At the supermarket, today’s worries...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Jan 2022

Washington at the Plow: The Founding Father and the Question of Slavery

BOOK REVIEW: Washington at the Plow: The Founding Father and the Question of Slavery by Bruce A. Ragsdale (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2021)... The post Washington at the Plow: The Founding Father and the Question of Slavery appeared first...

At the Academy, No. 8 Soho Square, London

Author: Soho Academy (London, England) Title: At the Academy, No. 8 Soho Square, London, young gentlemen are bearded & taught the English, French, Latin & Greek languages, writing, arithmetic, geography, book-keeping, and the mathematics, at...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 7 Jan 2022

Card to Lord Hood

Creator: Independent Shopkeeper. Title: Card to Lord Hood. Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1788] Catalog Record File 646 788 Acquired March 2020
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Dec 2021

18th century perfumer’s trade cards

Advertising was just as important in the 18th and 19th centuries as it is today. In order to really promote your business it was essential to invest in both newspaper advertising and also to have a trade/ business card and unlike many today, 18th century...
From: All Things Georgian on 22 Nov 2021

November 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Freight or Passage.” Charleston, one of the largest cities in the colonies during the era of the American Revolution, was a busy port and bustling center of commerce. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Nov 2021

October 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Yorkshire STUFFS for Negro [Women’s] Gowns.” The partnership of Powell, Hopton, and Company announced the sale of “A Cargo of One Hundred and Thirty-three HEALTHY and PRIME...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Oct 2021

Captain John Bacon: The Last of the Jersey Pine Robbers

“Captain John Bacon: His name was second only to that of the New Jersey devil for producing nightmares among the inhabitants of the pine... The post Captain John Bacon: The Last of the Jersey Pine Robbers appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Shop tax, or no shop tax?

In support of Lord John Townshend against Lord Samuel Hood in the Westminster election of 1788   Author: Enemy to the Shop Tax. Title: Shop tax, or no shop tax? Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1788] Catalog Record File 66 788...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 30 Aug 2021

Mrs. Edwards, Paragon, Black Heath

Date based on the February 1813 lease to Mrs. Rebecca Edwards of No. 12 ‘The Paragon’ Blackheath, which appears to have been acquired to open her school for ladies. Engraved throughout; with greek-key and hatchwork border. Text continues with itemized...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 17 Aug 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.