The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "trade"

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Your search for posts with tags containing trade found 360 posts

Hanging the Slave Traders

Books with the title of The Newgate Calendar were published as early as the mid-eighteenth century. Mostly they were collections of “Last Dying Speeches” of criminals and short biographies of felons such as Jack Sheppard, Dick Turpin, and...

New book: C.J. Grant’s Political Drama: Radicalism and Graphic Satire in the Age of Reform

You might have noticed that things have been rather quiet around here for the last year or two? There are a lot of reasons for this: I have a family and a job like many of you, but I’ve also been spending most of my spare time writing a book about...
From: The Print Shop Window on 5 Aug 2020

August

Who was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Parcel of young healthy NEW NEGROES.” A woodcut that crudely depicted four figures, presumably enslaved men, women, and children, adorned an advertisement in the August...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 2 Aug 2020

Smugglers, Pirates, and Patriots: Free Trade in the Age of Revolution

Smugglers, Pirates, and Patriots: Free Trade in the Age of Revolution by Tyson Reeder. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019 America’s struggle for liberty ushered... The post Smugglers, Pirates, and Patriots: Free Trade in the Age of Revolution...

May 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “No Part of the Cargo will be sold but in the Yard on the Day of Sale.” It was the first advertisement readers encountered as they perused the May 9, 1770, edition of...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 May 2020

Ann Collard (c.1726-1778)

Ann Collard née Jacques was a haberdasher and milliner who worked on Bishopsgate Street in London in the eighteenth century. In 1747, Ann married George Collard, a freemen of the Merchant Taylors’ Company, and the table below details the...
From: A Fashionable Business on 6 May 2020

WFH 2: Tradesmen and Tools for Working from Home, Chapter 1

For this second instalment of ‘Working from Home’ in early modern England, I’m going to take a look at some of the tools and materials urban individuals used as part of their trade in two posts. The first looks at the wider uses of tools...
From: Middling Culture on 21 Apr 2020

March 28

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “NEW NEGROES, CHIEFLY MEN.” On March 28, 1770, Joseph Clay placed an advertisement in the Georgia Gazette to announce the sale of “A CARGO consisting of about...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Mar 2020

March 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “A second-hand Coach, a Variety of second-hand Chaises.” Adino Paddock, a coachmaker, occasionally advertised in Boston’s newspapers in the late 1760s and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Mar 2020

Witness to the Massacre

This week is filled with events in commemoration of the Sestercentennial  (or Semiquincentennial?) of the Boston Massacre on March 5: the usual reenactment, and much more. For a full calendar check out this post on Boston 1775, one of my very favorite...
From: streets of salem on 3 Mar 2020

Tanning Hides to make Leather in the 18th Century.

Tanning Hides to make Leather in the 18th Century.The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Leatherworker in Eighteenth-CenturyWilliamsburg, by Thomas K. FordThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere in the United States andmost other parts of the world at...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Feb 2020

Mary Reynolds (fl. 1694-1720)

Mary Reynolds was a member of the Mercers’ Company, working as a milliner in the City of London in the early eighteenth century. She was the daughter of William Reynolds, a gentleman from Canterbury in Kent and was apprenticed to a widow named Susanna...
From: A Fashionable Business on 12 Feb 2020

The Pittsburgh Waste Book. Trade Items 1759.

PAGE ONE.My Thanks to Spence for the link to this book.Keith.https://digital.library.pitt.edu/islandora/object/pitt%3A31735061278424/viewer#page/8/mode/2up;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Feb 2020

Axes in New France: Part 111 Casse-têtes (French Tomahawks)

https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.109/tnx.0f5.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Axes-in-New-France-Part-3-Casse-t%C3%AAtes-French-Tomahawks.pdf
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Jan 2020

Axes in New France: Part 1 The Biscayan Axe

https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.109/tnx.0f5.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Axes-in-New-France-Part-1-The-Biscayan-Axe.pdf
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Jan 2020

Christmas Recipes in Early Modern Barcelona

Marta Manzanares Mileo In 1786, Rafael d’Amat i de Cortada, a member of Catalan nobility known as Baron of Maldà, described the Christmas holiday in his memoirs, noting that: “All sorts of torrons are sold in confectionery shops at...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Dec 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.