The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "traditions"

Showing 1 - 20 of 22

Your search for posts with tags containing traditions found 22 posts

Scot John Harrower on arriving in America 1774

 John Harrower Leaves London for Virginia, 1774John Harrower, a 40-year-old shopkeeper & tradesman, lived in the far north of the British Isles. Like many of the 40,000 residents of the Scottish Highlands who left after 1760, he found little...
From: 18th-century American Women on 14 May 2020

10-Year-Old Nova Scotia Girl Learning about Proper Tea Ettiquite at Finishing School in Early America

Anna Green Winslow (1759-1779) was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, the daughter of Joshua Winslow & his wife Anna Green. In 1770, at the age of 10, she was sent south to a finishing school in Boston, where she lived with her aunt & uncle, Sarah...
From: 18th-century American Women on 2 Apr 2020

Louisiana 18C - Race determined the Woma's place in the Social Hierarchy & even mandated Headwear

The tignon was the mandatory headwear for Creole women in Louisiana during the Spanish colonial period, and the style was adopted throughout the Caribbean island communities as well. This headdress was required by Louisiana laws in 1785. Called the...
From: 18th-century American Women on 23 Mar 2020

Halloween Special: Shaving the Dead in Irish Folklore

Shaving the dead in Irish folklore The Irish Folklore Collection archive in University College Dublin contains a massive volume of documents, sound-recordings and other material collected under the auspices of the Irish Folklore Commission and other bodies...
From: DrAlun on 31 Oct 2019

Easter Bunny - 18th-Century Pennsylvania Fractur

This drawing is an example of a Pennsylvania German tradition of decorated manuscripts known as fraktur.  This delightful image is attributed to tailor, sailor, & schoolmaster Johann Conrad Gilbert (1734–1812), who emigrated from Germany...
From: 18th-century American Women on 21 Apr 2019

Throwing at cocks and other pastimes: Shrove Tuesday in the Georgian Era

The person, Sir, who I informed you had last year swallowed a fork on Shrove Tuesday, discharged it by the anus the same year, (1715) on the 25th June. Ahem! Now we’ve got your attention, today being Shrove Tuesday, we’re taking a look at...
From: All Things Georgian on 5 Mar 2019

Tea Time in 18C Massachusetts

Creamware Tea Pot from Leeds c 1780In America during the 18th century, young & the old from all levels of society occasionally spent their leisure time taking tea together.Elizabeth Fuller (1775-1856) was 14 years-old, when she started keeping a diary....
From: 18th-century American Women on 19 Jan 2019

Turtles, Turtles, Turtles - Food & Drink at 18C American New Year's gatherings

In 1774 John Adams recorded in his diary on several special occasions enjoying the turtle on the dinner table, while visiting Philadelphia for the First Continental Congress. 1774 Septr. 11. "Dined at Mr. Willings, who is a Judge of the Supream Court...
From: 18th-century American Women on 1 Jan 2019

Two Song/Dances/Games Played During a Regency Christmas Season

Jane Austen’s Christmas Day at Godmersham Park, her brother’s estate in the English countryside of Kent, was a merry one. As described by Claire Tomalin in Jane Austen: A Life , “Christmas was celebrated with carols, card games, blindman’s...
From: Jane Austen's World on 25 Dec 2018

Regency Era Christmas Evergreen Decorations

On Christmas Eve the children laid out the traditional holly branches on the window ledges…” Jane Austen: A Life, Claire Tomalin, p. 4. Christmas decorations during the Regency era were relatively simple compared to today’s standards,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Dec 2018

The Christmas Ball at Hamilton Hall

It is formally called the “Holiday Dance” now, but I always think of it as the Christmas Dance or better yet, the Christmas Ball, held next door at Hamilton Hall since whenever. I’ve been going for decades, and it really never gets old...
From: streets of salem on 16 Dec 2018

Christmas Carols of Yore

Faithful readers, Once again December has caught me flat footed. It is almost 10 days into the month and I am still researching interesting historical information about Christmas holiday celebrations as Jane Austen would have known them. While many books,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 Dec 2018

Strawberries and cream: a Wimbledon tradition with a long history

With the commencement of Wimbledon, our thoughts – naturally – turn towards that perennial British summer favourite, fresh strawberries and cream. Henry VIII’s Lord Chancellor, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey (or rather, his cook!) is often credited...
From: All Things Georgian on 3 Jul 2018

May Day festivities in the Georgian Era

Traditionally, on May Day, people danced around a maypole erected for the purpose, and although this custom was becoming less popular in the 18th and 19th centuries, it was still adhered to by some.   Johann Peter Neeff (1753-1796)  (Derby...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 Apr 2015

Cross Buns From Pegs & Tails.

https://pegsandtails.wordpress.com/2015/04/03/cross-buns/#comment-6926
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 3 Apr 2015

A New Year’s Recipe from Old Prussia

By Molly Taylor-Polesky In the winter of 1397, the effects of plague were finally beginning to lift in Königsberg, Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia). The citizens, grateful that the Lord’s wrath had been appeased through their suffering and prayer,...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Jan 2014

A Romp Loving Miss Under the Mistletoe (1796)

Ah, Christmas. For centuries it has been the season of love, giving, and sentimental sickliness of all persuasions. But, let’s face it, it has also provided the perfect opportunity for countless lusty young couples to indulge in a bit of festive...
From: The History of Love on 23 Dec 2013

Ancient death rites

My father died recently, my mother many years before. I was with my mother when she died, and with my father in his last hours. My mother had the good fortune to die at home, under Hospice care. My sister Robin and her partner Betsy came prepared with...
From: Sandra Gulland on 28 Feb 2013

The Eve of St. Agnes

From John Keats' narrative poem:St. Agnes' Eve—Ah, bitter chill it was! The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold; The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, And silent was the flock in woolly fold: Numb were the Beadsman's fingers, while he...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.