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Search Results for "translations"

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Your search for posts with tags containing translations found 44 posts

Death of the author? Translation and the potential loss of authorship in Voltaire’s Commentaire historique

Voltaire’s autobiographical work, Commentaire historique sur les œuvres de l’auteur de La Henriade. Avec les pièces originales et les preuves (1776), is a text that challenges our understanding of the nascent autobiographical form at the end of...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 23 Jun 2022

The problems with translating Voltaire two hundred and fifty years on

Voltaire’s Dictionnaire philosophique portatif in its German translation by Angelika Oppenheimer. My translation of Voltaire’s first (1764) version of Dictionnaire philosophique portatif appeared in 2020 under the imprint of Reclam. Mine is the...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 Apr 2022

The first German translation of Les Contes des fées

A longstanding scholarly consensus holds that German translations of Madame d’Aulnoy’s fairy tales did not appear until the second half of the eighteenth century, starting with Das Cabinet der Feen published in 1761-65 by Friedrich Immanuel Bierling.1...
From: Anecdota on 21 Feb 2022

Marketing Voltaire: Tobias Smollett and the first edition of Voltaire’s works in English translation

Authors – or rather authorial brand names – sell books. They also sell translations. From the 1730s onwards, the name ‘Voltaire’ was well enough known in England to ensure that translations of his work were many and various, even if their reception...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 2 Dec 2021

The Magic of Socotran Aloe

By Shireen Hamza “The people of this island are without faith — and they are strong magicians. They originate from Greece.” What? I had been flipping through Ikhtiyārāt-i Badī‘ī, a Persian pharmaceutical manuscript...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Oct 2020

Revisiting Diana Luft’s Treating the Stone in Sixteenth-Century Wales

Today we revisit a post originally published in 2017 by Diana Luft on a sixteenth-century recipe against the stone ascribed to a certain Vicar of Gwenddwr, Wales. The recipe is in Welsh, but includes names of some ingredients in English, perhaps indicating...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 May 2020

Exploring multilingual digital editions

The Taylor Institution Library recently launched a new course teaching digital editing, with students able to create digital editions in any language of their choice. I was delighted to be able to contribute by designing the accompanying website on which...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 4 Apr 2019

“Daily Recipes for Home Cooking” (1924)

Nathan Hopson This is the second in a planned series of posts on nutrition science and government-sanctioned recipes in imperial Japan. Imagine a national cookbook. What would that look like? What would it say about the values and ideology of the society...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Apr 2019

The “Nutrition Song”: Imperial Japan’s Recipe for National Nutrition

Nathan Hopson This is the first in a planned series of posts on nutrition science and government-sanctioned recipes in imperial Japan. In May 1922, Japan’s preeminent nutritionist, Saiki Tadasu, released a recording of his “Nutrition Song,”...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Jan 2019

Fairgoing Filipino Food in the Fifties

By R. Alexander Orquiza In 1950, the cooking demonstrations at the California State Fair were a way to taste and see the globe. Americans were eager to show their newfound cosmopolitan tastes. World War II had ended. Many Americans firmly believed in...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jun 2018

Selecting and Organizing Recipes in Late Antique and Early Byzantine Compendia of Medicine and Alchemy

This month, we’re excited to collaborate with History of Knowledge to celebrate the upcoming conference, Learning by the Book: Manuals and Handbooks in the History of Knowledge. The five-day event takes place at Princeton in June and features...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 May 2018

Finding Shakespeare Blog Round-up: November 2017

Take a look at the latest blog posts from the collections team at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Shakespeare in Thai (1 November) In this video, Kanlaya Coulsting chose to read Portia’s “The quality of mercy” speech...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 1 Dec 2017

Cold Case I. Hidden Identities Between Printed and Manuscript Recipes

Sabrina Minuzzi  The marginalia of printed books can sometimes reveal hidden worlds. Printed books themselves can be considered historical evidence, as I learned several years ago at university and as I have continued to discover in working more...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Apr 2017

Treating the Stone in Sixteenth-Century Wales (According to the Vicar of Gwenddwr)

By Diana Luft National Library of Wales MS. Peniarth 182 is a miscellany in the hand of Huw Pennant, a poet who lived and worked in Gwynedd and then Carmarthenshire at the turn of the sixteenth century.[1] The manuscript has the look of a personal collection,...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Apr 2017

How to cure a ‘headache’ in a Mesopotamian way?

Strahil V. Panayotov (The BabMed, ERC-Project, Free University of Berlin) In 7th century BC Nineveh, in an area located within today’s much-troubled Iraqi city of Mosul, an astonishing episode of human history occurred. Thousands of texts from all...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Jan 2017

From Dificio di ricette to Bâtiment des recettes: The Afterlife of Italian Secrets in France

By Julia Martins In 1525 a book called Opera nuova intitolata dificio di ricette was published in Venice. The book promised to reveal all kinds of secrets to the reader, from cosmetic to medical recipes. This anonymous Italian best seller (which we may...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Dec 2016

Translating Recipes 14: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 8 – BETWEEN 3

[This is the third of a three-part posting on BETWEEN-ness in recipes and their translation. For the first two parts, see here and here.] The following is a translation of our long-translated Manchu medical recipe in dialogue form, to explore the between-ness...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jan 2016

Translating Recipes 13: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 7 – BETWEEN

[This is the second of a three-part posting on BETWEEN-ness in recipes and their translation. For the first part, see here.] Happy new year, readers of the Translating Recipes series! When last we met, I was telling you about the latest exploration of...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Jan 2016

Want a really authentic Shakespeare experience? Try not understanding some words!

At our recent Back-to-School Night, the parent of a former student wanted to know what I thought of a recent article he’d read about whether Shakespeare’s language should be translated “into English.” I hadn’t read the article...
From: Thinking in Arden on 8 Oct 2015

Happy Birthday, Father Edward Caswall

According to John Julian in the 1907 Dictionary of Hymnology: Caswall, Edward, M.A., son of the Rev. R. C. Caswall, sometime Vicar of Yately, Hampshire, born at Yately, July 15, 1814, and educated at Brasenose College, Oxford, graduating in honours in...

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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This is the basic structure:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.