The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "transnational history"

Showing 1 - 20 of 32

Your search for posts with tags containing transnational history found 32 posts

The Business of Transnational History: An Editor’s Perspective

Michael J. McGandy [Michael McGandy is Senior Editor at Cornell University Press, with a keen sense of the field of early North American history. Borealia’s Keith Grant recently sat down with him (virtually) to talk about how transnational history,...
From: Borealia on 9 Sep 2019

Ethnicity, Nationalism, and the Irish: Networks of Diaspora in Early-Twentieth Century Northeastern North America

Patrick Mannion On October 4th, 1920, Irish-Canadian nationalist Katherine Hughes arrived in St. John’s, the capital and chief port of the Dominion of Newfoundland. Her objective was to establish a branch of the Self-Determination for Ireland League...
From: Borealia on 17 Dec 2018

Royalist Republicans in the United Provinces

The cover of an excellent book. I have just finished reading Helmer Helmers’ The Royalist Republic (CUP, 2015), which offers a profound challenge to received views of Anglo-Dutch relations during the seventeenth century, in particular the idea...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Dec 2018

Colonial Canada: Making the Familiar Dis/Comfortingly Strange

Daniel Samson In my introductory colonial Canadian survey course, students sometimes complain that I spend “all” of my time on Nova Scotia. That’s not actually true, but I understand their point. It may be true that I talk about Nova...
From: Borealia on 5 Nov 2018

Taking the Longer View: Environmental History as Early Modern History

Claire Campbell Welcome to our series on the environmental history of the early modern period! A project of NiCHE, the series is cross-posted here at Borealia. The idea for a series featuring scholarship from the early modern period – and querying...
From: Borealia on 1 Jun 2018

Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World: A Review

Ann Little Adele Perry, Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Critical Perspectives on Empire series. If you’re on Twitter this summer of 2017, perhaps your...
From: Borealia on 5 Jun 2017

Refugees Fit for Rescue: Loyalists, Maroons, and Mi’kmaq

Ruma Chopra How does Canada’s more open, even welcoming policy towards Syrian refugees fit with other refugees, black loyalists and Maroons who entered the Maritimes over 200 years ago when the colonies were peripheral regions within a larger British...
From: Borealia on 17 Apr 2017

Anishinaabe Aspirations – Anishinaabeg in the War of 1812, Part 6

Alan Corbiere The Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe, Odawa, Potowatomi) have always revered the island of Michilimackinac, so much so that at the conclusion of the War of 1812, the Odawa tried to keep it in their possession. The Odawa suggested that the British negotiators...
From: Borealia on 13 Mar 2017

Anishnaabeg in the War of 1812: More than Tecumseh and his Indians

Alan Corbiere This post is the first in a series of essays on Anishinaabeg participation in the War of 1812. The posts were previously published at ActiveHistory.ca and, in a modified version, in the July 2012 edition of the Ojibway Cultural Foundation...
From: Borealia on 23 Jan 2017

The Wilson Institute for Canadian History: Introduction and Vision of Canadian History

Maxime Dagenais Since I last posted with Borealia – a post titled “The ‘Canadian Revolution,’ the Early American Republic, and … Slavery?” – my SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship at the McNeil Center for Early American...
From: Borealia on 21 Nov 2016

Why National History Matters

Jerry Bannister [Ed. This essay is cross-posted with our partners at the Acadiensis blog.] Nations matter. National cultures matter. And national histories matter. As we try to understand what has happened in the United States, we should keep...
From: Borealia on 9 Nov 2016

Beyond Borders: A Reflection on the Challenges of Transnational, Multidisciplinary Scholarship in the Twenty-first Century

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy This fall, when nationalism is marking an unwelcome return in European and American politics, it behooves Early Canadianists to reflect on the relevance of borders–disciplinary and national–in studying and publishing...
From: Borealia on 24 Oct 2016

Harriet Tubman and Andrew Jackson: A Match Made in the U.S. Treasury Department

dann j. Broyld & Matthew Warshauer Note: This essay, with its cross-border themes, is being jointly posted by Borealia and The Republic, the new blog of the Society of Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR). Borealia is grateful for The...
From: Borealia on 13 Jun 2016

Jamaican Maroons in Nova Scotia: The politics of climate and race

Anya Zilberstein Not long after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau handed winter coats to Syrian refugees arriving in Toronto this past December, reports about the immigrants’ problems began appearing in the press. Rent gouging by dishonest landlords....
From: Borealia on 18 May 2016

Early Canadian Environmental History Series: Introduction & Essential Reading

Sean Kheraj and Denis McKim Welcome to a series on early Canadian environmental history, jointly hosted by Borealia and The Otter ~ La Loutre, the blog of The Network in Canadian History and Environment (NiCHE). This joint series...
From: Borealia on 16 May 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.