The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "transport"

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Your search for posts with tags containing transport found 43 posts

Carts, Ships, and Trains: Abusing the Deodand

Posted by Sara M. Butler, 29 May 2020. On 28 Nov. 1313, chancery issued a royal mandate to the bishop of Ely requesting that he deliver a sum of £50 sterling to Nicholas du Vual, a merchant from Caen. The mandate was responding to a complaint lodged...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 29 May 2020

17th Century Horseless Self Driving Wagon.

http://www.deadlinenews.co.uk/2020/03/27/university-researchers-give-rare-insight-in-new-book-on-17th-century-ad-men/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Mar 2020

Life aboard a Prison Ship

Many of the men who were taken prisoner during and after the 1745 Rebellion were held in prison ships. After Culloden ships could be seen in the Moray Firth, with no room in the town to house all the captives the ships were a floating prison. Even before...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 22 Feb 2020

The Real-Life Aeronauts

By Jason Pearl Flight was invented not by the Wright brothers in the early twentieth century but by the Montgolfiers, also brothers, in the late eighteenth. Over a hundred years of ballooning—for show, for fun, for war, for science—precede...
From: Age of Revolutions on 23 Dec 2019

The Sedan Chair of the Georgian Era

Would you really have wanted to walk around the streets of 18th century? They would have been dirty, smelly places and you could find yourself up to your ankles in the proverbial, probably not a pleasant experience – then why not try the sedan chair...
From: All Things Georgian on 3 Oct 2019

The Gold State Coach

LONDON, January 8. Yesterday the old State Coach, built for King George I and the Carriages of his late Majesty, given by the late Master of the Horse to the Servants, were sold at Bever’s Repository; it is remarkable the Gold Lace of the State...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Jul 2019

June 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-London Gazette (June 30, 1769). “A neat BOAT, suitable for the reception of passengers.” Readers encountered four advertisements for transportation via “Passage...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Jun 2019

Order authorizing payment to Jonathan Forward….

Manuscript signed by the Prime Minister, Robert Walpole ordering George Earl of Halifax to arrange payment to the merchant Jonathan Forward, for transporting 66 convicts from Newgate Jail to His Majesties plantations in America aboard the ship Anne, Captain...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Dec 2018

Cave Dwellers of Mansfield, Nottinghamshire

Known as the ‘rock houses’ they are a well-known feature of the town of Mansfield, Nottinghamshire in the East Midlands and only a few miles away from Newstead Abbey, home of Lord Byron. A View in Newstead Park, belonging to the Rt. Hon. Lord...
From: All Things Georgian on 8 Nov 2018

Gunpowder Bags. Another link.

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=I5joCwAAQBAJ&pg=PT243&lpg=PT243&dq=was+gunpowder+sold+in+bags+18th+century&source=bl&ots=3h9QLzRcX9&sig=55npk0Vmjrl3rzAmT56VA0vFEtw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjs9Puc3rneAhWBgI8KHfEIC9E4ChDoATABegQIBRAB#v=onepage&q=was%20gunpowder%20sold%20in%20bags%2018th%20century&f=false
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 4 Nov 2018

Execution Delayed: Some Scottish Examples

By Cassie Watson; posted 23 September 2018. Crime historians are familiar with some of the more widely reported cases of delayed or failed executions that occurred in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In July 1798 Mary Nicholson, a...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 23 Sep 2018

Forum Notifications?

Just in case you have not been receiving any notifications from our group forum, there are a stack of new posts in a variety of topics.This forum is not the same as the old one, & some of you may have failed to click on the subscribe to topic! Anyway,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 7 Apr 2018

Slide Carrs & Drag Carts.

From some accounts the slide carr or drag cart was one of the earliest known forms of transport. These were certainly in use in Europe, Ireland, Scotland & Wales from roughly the 16th century to the early 20th century. These carts or carrs could be...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Apr 2018

The Arsenic Poisoner

Elizabeth Hinchcliff, aged 14, stood before the court at the Old Bailey, on September 19th, 1810, indicted, that, on August 16th, 1810 she administered a deadly poison, arsenic, with the intent of murdering her employer, Ann Parker, two children in her...
From: All Things Georgian on 13 Feb 2018

January 23

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (January 23, 1768).“Three very compleat Stage-Boats, for the Carriage of GOODS and PASSENGERS.” In the late 1760s, Thomas Lindsey and Benjamin Lindsey...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 23 Jan 2018

August 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston-Gazette (August 31, 1767).“Stage-Coach No. I. … SETS out on every Tuesday Morning.” Thomas Sabin operated “Stage-Coach No. 1” between Boston...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Aug 2017

May 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (May 26, 1767).“Good horses and chairs, which he will hire out by the day.” Personal transportation was a major investment...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 May 2017

February 26

GUEST CURATOR: Samuel Birney What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (February 26, 1767).“TO BE SOLD A standing Top-Chaise … and a very neat Sulkey.” The advertisement featured...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Feb 2017

Charles Kinnaister: Executed for the Murder of Australian Aborigines (1838)

Broadly speaking, criminals fall into three types: heroes, buffoons, and brutes.[i] The categories are just as applicable to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as they are today – ‘heroes’ would be men like Ronnie Biggs, the Great...

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By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.