The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing twitter found 72 posts

The Digitizing Enlightenment ‘twitterstorm’ of 3 August

This past week our publication partner, Liverpool University Press, shipped out copies of Digitizing Enlightenment: digital humanities and the transformation of eighteenth-century studies, edited by Simon Burrows and Glenn Roe, the July volume of Oxford...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 13 Aug 2020

Remember, remember, the fifth of November

Our 2019 transcribathon is coming soon… November 5! Flex those fingers, boot up your computer, and get ready to join in, because this is no ordinary transcribathon. We have lots of exciting activities planned to accompany our transcribing delights,...
From: emroc on 26 Oct 2019

Tech Update!

Our wonderful web editor, Erica Steiner, has been an extremely busy bee in recent weeks, updating the Cerae website to make it more streamlined and easier to use.  You  should be able to find articles and blog posts with ease now – have...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 25 Jun 2018

Talk to the Scholar (Book)

I have worked on more than fascinating projects this term (besides teaching and administrative duties), all of which may deserve a different post. We worked pretty much with more down than ups on re-establishing Digital Humanities MA programmes in Hungary....
From: Tudor and other studies on 19 Apr 2018

Introducing… the social media editor

This post is the first in a series in which the academics behind Cerae will introduce themselves and their research, to give a flavour of the diverse people and interests contributing to the running of a burgeoning academic journal. I’m Kirsty and...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 26 Mar 2018

The way we work

I was   I was fascinated by this series of posts on Twitter by Bradley Irish…  It’s true, I think.  I was reminded of some interviews done by the Marine Lives project last year which looked at the way historians carry out research...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 23 Nov 2017

The #OthellosCrane Project: Storify

¶ Dear readers, ¶ I’ve just completed a Twitter play with a group of first-year seminar students here at Pacific University, and it has been an amazing experience. I am planning on writing about it in more detail in the future–and...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 14 Nov 2017

Donald Trump and Shakespeare

A scene from the New York production of Julius Caesar Shakespeare’s fascination with politics can be seen in many of his plays, not only those directly based on British history. The Roman plays too examine the workings of power, looking at how...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 18 Jun 2017

Doing it in public: Impact, blogging, social media and the academy

The text below is derived from a short talk I gave in February for the Library at the University of Sussex.  At the time (and in the text) I promised to post it as a blog, but never quite found the time.  Impact is an awkward thing in British...
From: Historyonics on 16 Jul 2014

Guest Post: Dr. Strangehonor, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Snapchat

How much should we engage with students on the social media apps that they used? This semester, Honor Sachs experimented with using Snapchat, and reports her results.
From: The Junto on 6 Dec 2016

Life in the Wilderness: Ten Tips for Surviving in Academia as an ECR

This blog post is intended for PhD students and early career academics. Since passing my viva (see blog post here) in January, I've learnt many things about the job market, current trends and what can really help you get shortlisted for a job. Here are...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 22 Sep 2016

What’s Livetweeting For, Anyway?

Is it all for show? Jonathan Wilson asked historians why they livetweet at conferences.
From: The Junto on 11 Aug 2016

August Blogroll: New News Edition

Dear readers, Yesterday, I rewarded a day of syllabi- and lesson-planning with an afternoon trip to Powell’s bookstore here in Portland. It was completely brilliant, as famed and expected, and I managed to pick up a few gifts for friends and a little...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 2 Aug 2016

Guest post – Shakespeare, social media, and everyday creativity

Over the past five weeks I’ve been working with Holly Reaney, as part of the University of Birmingham’s Undergraduate Research Scholarship programme. Holly has just completed the first year of her BA in English at UoB and has been helping...
From: Digital Shakespeares on 1 Aug 2016

Academic Anxiety: Thinking Patterns in Academia

On a previous post I wrote about the eye-opening statistic that 1 in 4 people experience mental health problems in any given year. I also talked about my anxiety disorder openly for the first time. Panic attacks, overwhelming worry and difficulty sleeping...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 25 Apr 2016

Staying focused: streamed theatre and me

I’ve been thinking about attention this week. Not the kind that other people give to you, but the kind you create yourself. Focus. Concentration. Absorption. Immersion. I’ve been thinking about it because sustained, unbroken attention is something...
From: Digital Shakespeares on 8 Mar 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.