The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "water"

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Your search for posts with tags containing water found 290 posts

Sailing Under John Paul Jones: The Memoir of Continental Navy Midshipman Nathaniel Fanning

Sailing Under John Paul Jones: The Memoir of Continental Navy Midshipman Nathaniel Fanning, 1778-1783, edited by Louis Arthur Norton. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company,... The post Sailing Under John Paul Jones: The Memoir of Continental Navy Midshipman...

This Week on Dispatches: Andrew Waters on Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter and the Revolution in the South

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews author, land conservationist, and JAR contributor Andrew Waters on how Nathanael Greene and Thomas Sumter fought against... The post This Week on Dispatches: Andrew Waters on Nathanael...

The Quaker and the Gamecock

The Quaker and the Gamecock: Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter, and the Revolutionary War for the Soul of the South by Andrew Waters (Casemate, 2019) Among... The post The Quaker and the Gamecock appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

This Week on Dispatches: Matthew Reardon on the Whaleboat Wars on the Connecticut River

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews history teacher and JAR contributor Matthew Reardon on the Loyalist raid up the Connecticut River in 1782 when... The post This Week on Dispatches: Matthew Reardon on the Whaleboat...

HMSBlue Mountain Valley and the Rise of Lord Stirling

“A Most Dreadful Voyage” was how the captain of British supply ship Blue Mountain Valley described his mission to North America in the fall and... The post HMS<i>Blue Mountain Valley</i> and the Rise of Lord Stirling appeared...

Casimir Pulaski and the Threat to the Upper Delaware River Valley

If January and February 1778 was Brig. Gen. Casimir Pulaski’s “Winter of his Discontent,”[1] then October through December 1778 was his “Autumn of Despair.”... The post Casimir Pulaski and the Threat to the Upper Delaware...

Revolutionary Revenge on Hudson Bay, 178

French naval officer La Pérouse (Jean Francois de Galaup, Comte de la Pérouse) was one of many who actively supported the American Patriots in... The post Revolutionary Revenge on Hudson Bay, 1782 appeared first on Journal of the American...

Lt. Jacob Rogers and the “Confusion” in Charlestown

One of the more unusual accounts of the start of the Revolutionary War came from Jacob Rogers, former commander of the Royal Navy ship Halifax.In 1774 Lt. Rogers left the navy (more on that eventually), married Anne Barber, and settled in her home town...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Apr 2020

Letter, 18th April 1840: to John Russell Smith

Great Totham Hall near Witham April 18th 1840 Dr Sir, Just as it always is! I now find that I shall not be able to send you the promised parcel of “Bokes” for a fortnight from their time! “What a fellow that Clark is!” methinks...
From: Finding Charles Clark on 16 Apr 2020

Snail salves, waters, & syrups

In an old blog post about treating urinary conditions we included a remedy made of snail shells. Mary Fleetwood’s sunburn recipe also contained snail. Snails perhaps because they were easily accessible animal products, were a regular ingredient...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 15 Apr 2020

Some Out of Town Jasper

As I quoted yesterday, in 1853 a story surfaced saying that Josiah Waters, Jr., had delivered intelligence about the impending British army march on 18 Apr 1775.This story is significant in predating Henry W. Longfellow’s poem “Paul Revere’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Apr 2020

Attack up the Connecticut River: The First British Raid on Esse

By April 1782, the war in America was supposed to be over. It had been nearly six months since Lord Cornwallis surrendered his army... The post Attack up the Connecticut River: The First British Raid on Essex appeared first on Journal of the American...

Was Josiah Waters Obtain the News of the British March?

Some accounts of the Battle of Lexington and Concord in April 1775 credit Josiah Waters of Boston with helping to provide intelligence about the British army’s plans to Dr. Joseph Warren. How did Waters enter the historical picture?Waters’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Apr 2020

George Washington’s Honorary Degree from Harvard

On 3 Apr 1776, Harvard College awarded an honorary doctor of laws (Ll.D.) degree to Gen. George Washington.The official college record of the event reads:At a meeting of the President and Fellows at Watertown, Voted, that the following Diploma be presented...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Apr 2020

Plague Water

Over the past few weeks, friends, family members, students, and colleagues have been asking me about plague and recipes. Outbreaks of the plague, and restrictive public health initiatives designed to stop the spread of the disease, were a regular...
From: Cooking in the Archives on 2 Apr 2020

The Revolutionary War Origin of the Whistleblower Law

The so called “whistleblower law” had a salty source. It did not emanate from the shrill sound of a boatswain’s pipe, but rather a... The post The Revolutionary War Origin of the Whistleblower Law appeared first on Journal of the American...

FOOD IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY TIDEWATER VIRGINIA

https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/bitstream/handle/10919/26153/LD5655.V856_1982.S772.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=yFOOD IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY TIDEWATER VIRGINIA: A METHOD FOR STUDYING HISTORICAL CUISINES by Maryellen Spencer Dissertation submitted to the...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Feb 2020

Lead Crystal

Roemer type drinking glass c. 1677,George Ravenscroft.The entire fourth part of Antonio Neri's 1612 book L'Arte Vetraria is devoted to the preparation of lead glass, a forerunner of what is now commonly known as lead crystal. This section is...
From: Conciatore on 7 Feb 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.