The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "weapons"

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Your search for posts with tags containing weapons found 127 posts

More Mild Mayhem in Marlborough

All right, now that I’ve calmed down from spotting William Benson staying out of the political dispute/gang brawl in Marlborough on 17 July 1770, I can move on to the people who were actually involved.The “Honest Ploughjogger” letter...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jul 2020

Assault on a “young lad” in Marlborough

Now to get back to events in Marlborough in July 1770.Back here I quoted a letter published in the Boston Gazette on 30 July 1770, describing an effigy of local merchant Henry Barnes on horseback. And here I quoted the part of that article discussing...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jul 2020

“A Letter was left by some unknown Person”

In 1770, the Boston town meeting named Henry Barnes as one of a small group of businesspeople who were openly defying the town’s non-importation agreement.Barnes was unusual in that group because his shop and main business were off in rural Marlborough,...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2020

“The affair of breaking Mr. Hulton’s Windows at Brookline”

Yesterday we left Henry Hulton under attack in his home in Brookline.Hulton, one of the five Commissioners of Customs for North America appointed in London, had been woken on the night of 19 June 1770 by a man claiming to have a letter for him. He...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jun 2020

“Including the records of very poor people”

I’ve been analyzing Michael Bellesiles’s interview on Daniel Gullotta’s Age of Jackson podcast last year, particularly his comments about the Emory University committee that criticized his book Arming America.The relevant part of that...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 May 2020

“Prolix, confusing, evasive and occasionally contradictory”

As I described yesterday, in 2002 Emory University asked three senior historians from other colleges to investigate specific questions about Michael Bellesiles’s research in Arming America.The committee’s report (P.D.F. download) concluded:Subsequent...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 May 2020

Arming America: How “the Controversy Arose”

As I described yesterday, in 2002 Emory University asked three outside scholars to investigate charges of “failures of scholarly care and integrity” against Michael Bellesiles, author of Arming America.Those scholars were academic heavyweights:...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 May 2020

Arming America Twenty Years On

As my Sestercentennial postings from last fall recounted, the last part of the year 1769 in Boston was punctuated with gunfire:a shot from a British soldier’s musket during the Neck Riot.two pistol shots during the merchants’ assault on John...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 May 2020

Book offer - both books are excellent

Century of the Soldier 1618-1721 Series Special Offer!For a limited time we're giving you 25% discount off both brand new titles in the Century of the Soldier series 'I Am Minded to Rise' and 'The Perfection of Military Discipline'.Buy 'I Am Minded to...
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 15 Apr 2020

Some Out of Town Jasper

As I quoted yesterday, in 1853 a story surfaced saying that Josiah Waters, Jr., had delivered intelligence about the impending British army march on 18 Apr 1775.This story is significant in predating Henry W. Longfellow’s poem “Paul Revere’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Apr 2020

“In like manner killed by two balls”

As discussed yesterday, there’s good evidence that Crispus Attucks was the first person shot at the Boston Massacre.There’s even stronger evidence that he was hit with two musket balls. The 12 Mar 1770 Boston Gazette reported that Attucks...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Apr 2020

Robert Patterson’s Memory of the Massacre

On 20 Mar 1770, 250 years ago yesterday, a sailor named Robert Patterson testified to his memory of the Boston Massacre.Patterson was one of the men wounded in that shooting—badly wounded in one arm. Furthermore, he had also been at the Christopher...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Mar 2020

Looking for Trouble, Even on the Sabbath

Among the men who brawled at John Gray’s ropewalk on 2 Mar 1770 were a young ropemaker named Samuel Gray (no known relation) and Pvts. William Warren and Mathew Kilroy of the 29th Regiment. The next day, there were more fights in Boston. Some redcoats...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Mar 2020

Five Ways of Looking at a Brawl

Here are five men’s perspectives on what happened outside John Gray’s ropewalk in central Boston on Friday, 2 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today.Samuel Bostwick, ropemaker:between 10 and 11 o’clock in the forenoon, three soldiers of the 29th...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Mar 2020

Interesting book on the plug bayonet

Coming out mid March apparently. The publicity saysThe book re-evaluates both the plug bayonet as a weapon and its implementation which fundamentally changed how it impacted both the formation and tactics of all armies of the long seventeen century. The...
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 22 Feb 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part

Here are the answers to the questions remaining from part 1 of the Great 1770 Quiz, along with the background and sources for each answer. III. Match the person to the weapon he reportedly carried at the Boston Massacre.1) catstick2) cordwood stick3)...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2020

Ens. Eld Stops into a New York Coffeehouse

After participating in the skirmish over prisoners in the Westchester “neutral ground” on 18-19 Jan 1780, as I’ve been describing, Ens. George Eld of the Coldstream Guards went into New York City.He might have expected a respite from...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jan 2020

‘A DESPERAT WEPON’: RE-HAFTED SCYTHES AT SEDGEMOOR, IN WARFARE AND AT THE TOWER OF LONDON

Fascinating article on Monmouth's weapons. By Edward ImpeyJournal: The Antiquaries Journal,  Published online by Cambridge University Press: 03 December 2019, pp. 1-46 Here
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 2 Jan 2020

“At length the Gentleman fired a Pistol”

Richard Draper published an issue of the Boston News-Letter on Friday, 26 Nov 1773.That in itself was notable. The News-Letter normally appeared on Thursdays. The one-week change might reflect a flood of news during the tea crisis, or just some difficulty...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Dec 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.