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Your search for posts with tags containing weapons found 147 posts

Guns on Mount Defiance

Discussions about the American evacuation of Mount Independence and Fort Ticonderoga on the night of July 5, 1777 frequently address the question: could shot... The post Guns on Mount Defiance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Dragoon sword c17

 National Army Museum for more details
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 11 Jul 2021

English Officers' sword c169

Here for more photos and details. Military swords of this era are rare so I was chuffed to find this.
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 11 Jul 2021

Commanding Lt. Col. Abijah Brown

As I related yesterday, Lt. Col. Abijah Brown chose not to reenlist in the Continental Army for the year 1776. He remained in Waltham as the army moved south.But Brown remained active in the Massachusetts militia. As much of a headache as he was to work...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 May 2021

Case Study of a Wounded Provincial

At Historical Nerdery, Alexander Cain just shared an essay by Joel Bohy and Douglas D. Scott, who have been studying musket balls and the damage they can cause. In this particular posting, that damage was to the body of John Robbins, who was standing...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Apr 2021

Tay, Hayward, and the Massachusetts Government

On 19 Apr 1775, William Tay, Jr., of Woburn helped to storm a house along the Battle Road, kill two redcoats, and capture the third. He claimed that man’s arms for his own.The only problem, as Tay saw it, was that Lt. Joseph Hayward of Concord came...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Apr 2021

Joseph Hayward Comes Home from the Fight

Yesterday we heard William Tay, Jr., of Woburn describe the opening of the Revolutionary War and finally get to the point of why he was petitioning the Massachusetts General Court in September 1775. Tay was part of the loosely organized Massachusetts...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Apr 2021

William Tay, Jr., Enters the Fight

Here’s a first-person account of the opening day of the Revolutionary War from William Tay, Jr., of Woburn. There was a long sequence of William Tays in Woburn, and the “Jr.” suffix suggests this account came from the middle of the three...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Apr 2021

Riflemen Run Riot: The Mutiny at Prospect Hill

“They are remarkably stout and hardy men,” thought army surgeon James Thacher, “Dressed in white frocks, or rifle shirts, and round hats.” The robust... The post Riflemen Run Riot: The Mutiny at Prospect Hill appeared first on...

“Quite in the Land of Amaze”

Yesterday we left Israel Putnam at noon on Saturday, 3 Sept 1774, sending letters to many other Connecticut militia officers, passing on dire news he had heard about Boston.Putnam himself set off toward Boston on horseback with his local militia regiment,...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Feb 2021

The Adventures of a Steel Dress Sword

I’ve been discussing myths of Frederick the Great’s admiration for George Washington—claims that he had the highest praise for the Continental Army’s maneuvers around Trenton and that he sent the American general a picture of himself...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Jan 2021

The Myth of Frederick II’s Fan Letter to George Washington

On 20 May 1780, the Providence Gazette ran a paragraph headed “Extract of a Letter from an Officer in the American Army, dated May 4, 1780.” The article read: On Thursday we were mustered and inspected by the Baron Stuben. We had likewise...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jan 2021

“They would have brought in all Guilty…”

As described yesterday, the trial of the eight enlisted men for the Boston Massacre ended with six acquittals and two convictions.The acquitted men were Cpl. William Wemys and Pvts. James Hartigan, William Macauley, Hugh White, William Warren, and John...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Dec 2020

A Juror’s Notes on the Boston Massacre Trial

Edward Pierce (1735-1818) was a carpenter, farmer, and deacon in Dorchester. He came from the family that built and expanded the Pierce House, erected around 1683 and thus one of the oldest surviving structures in the state. The Dorchester Antiquarian...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Dec 2020

Samuel Plummer and His Father’s Sword

Here’s one more story from my foray up the coast from Boston to Gloucester.Dr. Samuel Plumer, the man who was keeping George Penn enslaved in 1770, had a son, also named Samuel. The younger man tended to spell his surname Plummer. Young Samuel Plummer...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Nov 2020

“My mother Cry’d out Jesse is dead”

As I described yesterday, on 7 Sept 1768 the Gloucester merchant David Plumer directed a mob to a house in the Annisquam village, seeking the Customs informant who had cost him a shipload of undeclared molasses.When those men couldn’t find that...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Nov 2020

The First Mobbing of Jesse Saville

Another event of 1770 that I neglected on its 250th anniversary this year was the mobbing of Jesse Saville.Or rather, the mobbing of Jesse Saville in March 1770, because we have to distinguish that mobbing from several others.To start at the beginning,...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Nov 2020

Investigating the Jason Russell House

The Arlington Historical Society just provided an interim report on various investigations into one of its historic properties, the Jason Russell House.This building was the focus of the deadliest skirmish on 19 Apr 1775. Russell and eleven militiamen,...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Oct 2020

The plug bayonet / Online lecture October 14

 By Mark Shearwood 14:00 – 15:00 BSTThe lecture takes a new look at the plug bayonet – an early model of bayonet inserted directly into the barrel of the musket, later supplanted by socket bayonets that fitted to the outside of the...
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 13 Oct 2020

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