The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing weather found 125 posts

The Life of Sarah Fayerweather

In 1756 Thomas Fayerweather (1724-1805), a wealthy Boston merchant, married Sarah Hubbard. She was a daughter of the treasurer of Harvard College, born in 1730. Her portrait by Robert Feke, now owned by Historic New England, appears here.According to...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jul 2019

A Cookbook Started in 1764

One of the items in the Harvard Library’s Colonial North American collection is the cookbook digitized here.Early in the book Sarah Fayerweather’s name appears over “June 26 MDCCLXIV,” telling us the initial owner and date.The...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jul 2019

“that phenomenon of Nature; a blaizing ocean”

ABIGAIL ADAMS continues her description of details of her voyage to England for her sister MARY CRANCH. If I did not write every day, I should lose the days of the month, and of the week, confined all day . . . on account of the weather; which is foggy,...
From: In the Words of Women on 18 Jun 2019

“The Sea running mountain high . . . “

On a voyage across the Atlantic in 1784 to join her husband John in London, ABIGAIL ADAMS kept a journal intended for her sister MARY CRANCH. Once her seasickness had abated Abigail took charge and supervised the cleaning of the passenger rooms on the...
From: In the Words of Women on 4 Jun 2019

Etching Salem

This is generally a beautiful time of year to take photographs around Salem but it’s been rather cold and dreary for the past few weeks, with the exception of a few isolated days. I’m sure that when everything dries out we will be living in...
From: streets of salem on 15 May 2019

Tornadoes & Whirlwinds in 18C America

1750 Joseph Badger (American Colonial Era artist, 1798-1765) Mrs. Nathaniel Brown (Anna Porter Brown) Beneath the Gathering CloudsI had suspected that tornadoes were usually called whirwinds in 18C America. As one man wrote in the 1739 Boston Newsletter,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 28 Apr 2019

The Snow Castle

We haven’t had many snowstorms this winter, but two nights ago about a foot of snow dropped onto the streets of Salem. My first thoughts when I woke up were: how much snow did we get (and) should I run down the street and take a picture...
From: streets of salem on 6 Mar 2019

Tudor Drama in Modern Performance

How might modern performance histories and theatrical experiments advance research on Tudor plays? On Friday 1stMarch at Newcastle University, an event on ‘Tudor Plays in Performance’ will address this question. Professor Jessica Winston will...
From: Before Shakespeare on 12 Feb 2019

An Eventful 1851 in Salem

The media—exclusively newspapers—looked back at the year’s events at its end in the nineteenth century just as it does today. This accounting was traditionally presented in the first few days of January by the Salem Observer, and...
From: streets of salem on 2 Jan 2019

31st December 1790 revisited – not a night to be out and about in Amsterdam.

To mark the end of the year, a snippet repeated from Richard’s diary for 1790: I have not come across a record of the disaster – although the century seems to have been marked by a number of catastrophic drownings in the canals around Amsterdam,...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 31 Dec 2018

The Weather in Whaplode, Lincolnshire

It’s a well-known fact that we Brits are obsessed with the weather… and with talking about it. Being an island, the old saying of ‘four seasons in a day’ sometimes seems more than a little accurate, and the weather can –...
From: All Things Georgian on 6 Nov 2018

October 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (October 29, 1768).“Weatherwise’s ALMANACK, For the Year 1769, To be Sold by the Printers hereof.” During the fall of 1768 printers throughout...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Oct 2018

A Great Hail as Big as Golf Balls, Eggs and Pistol Bullets in 1716 #History #Scotland

‘In May, this year [1719], we had a very great thunder at Edinburgh, which puts me in mind that May 1716, if I remember, much about this same time, ther was a very extraordinary hail shour in the parish of the Mearns. At Eastwood it was as bigg...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 14 Oct 2018

August 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (August 27, 1768).“Now in the PRESS … THE N. England Town and Country Almanack.” During the final week of August 1768, a signal that fall was...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Aug 2018

Rocks Village

We have had the longest stretch of horrible humid weather in my memory: it’s been hot too, but it’s the humidity that gets you, of course. The only place I’ve really been comfortable is my car, and so when I drove up to Maine for...
From: streets of salem on 19 Aug 2018

The Heatwave of 1808

Here in Britain temperatures have been incredibly high this year, which for those who like the heat it’s been glorious, but this is nothing new. 210 years ago in July 1808 Britain also experienced high temperatures. Given the British obsession with...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Jul 2018

1651 Winter Scarves run afoul of the Fashion Police in Massachusettes

Colonial Laws of Massachusetts, 1651Sumptuary Laws - Regarding What a Colonist May or May Not WearThe Freake Limner (American Colonial Era Painter, active 1670-c 1680) Mrs Elizabeth Freake and Baby Mary 1674ALTHOUGH SEVERAL DECLARATIONs and orders have...
From: 17th-century American Women on 24 May 2018

“To declare them all Prisoners of War”

HANNAH WINTRHOP continued her correspondence with MERCY OTIS WARREN. She reported in January 1778 that the British officers of the Convention Army, which had surrendered at Saratoga in 1777 and marched to Cambridge, “live in the most Luxurious manner...
From: In the Words of Women on 14 May 2018

The Convention Army

In 1777, in an attempt to divide New England from the other colonies, British and Hessian forces, under Lieutenant General John (Johnny) Burgoyne, marched from Canada through the Champlain Valley and Lake George intending to rendezvous at Albany with...
From: In the Words of Women on 4 May 2018

“Boston . . . busily employd in communicating the Infection”

Having returned to Cambridge from Concord, HANNAH WINTHROP wrote to her friend MERCY OTIS WARREN in July 1776. She described the condition of her home, the reopening of Harvard, and life in Boston after the British evacuation (pictured) on March 17. Last...
From: In the Words of Women on 1 May 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.