The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "wine"

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Your search for posts with tags containing wine found 130 posts

The Great Wine Blight

The Columbian Exchange is a much discussed phenomenon, but it can have had few more surprising consequences than the near total destruction of European wine production in the 19th century. The cause was phylloxera, a microscopic yellow aphid native to...
From: Mathew Lyons on 24 May 2022

Of Wine and Chocolate in Anne Dormer’s Letters

By Daphna Oren-Magidor “I drink chocolate when my soul is sad to death.” This statement echoes through time – who among us has not used chocolate as a temporary cure for the blues? –  but it was written in 1687 by Anne Dormer (c. 1648–1695),...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Dec 2021

Review: Decision at Brandywine: The Battle on Birmingham Hill

BOOK REVIEW: Decision At Brandywine: The Battle on Birmingham Hill by Robert M. Dunkerly (Yardley, PA: Westholme Publishing, 2021) Historian and National Park Ranger Robert... The post Review: Decision at Brandywine: The Battle on Birmingham Hill appeared...

August 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Mary Smith … will be obliged to the friends of her Husband for their Custom.” Following the death of her husband Thomas, a twine spinner, Mary Smith operated the family business...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Aug 2021

Body fanner, nut-cracker & wine helper

A stout man reclines on a chaise-longue; a small cup meets his lips, from which he drinks wine. Above this, a small tube from which cracked nuts descend. On the wall are two wheels and the mechanism which pours and decants the wine, and cracks the nuts....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 3 Jun 2021

A Portugal catch for three voices

“Three men sit, singing a catch, with a round table between them. A British officer (perhaps Cotton), wearing a cocked hat, sits in profile to the right, facing Dalrymple who sits (right) with tightly closed mouth, his hands on his knees. Between them,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 27 May 2021

Clement Biddle Partially Clears the “Battle of the Clouds”

One of the more intriguing limited actions of the Revolutionary War was the Battle of the Clouds on September 16, 1777, a meeting of... The post Clement Biddle Partially Clears the “Battle of the Clouds” appeared first on Journal of the American...

Thomas Read of Delaware, Part 3: Continental Navy Commander

Thomas Read (1740-1788) began his seafaring career as a merchant captain, sailing for the Philadelphia firm of Willing and Morris in the ship Aurora,... The post Thomas Read of Delaware, Part 3: Continental Navy Commander appeared first on Journal of...

To make white Hippocras

This post is adapted from an article that I published in a special issue of the Early Modern Studies Journal on Mary Baumfylde’s recipe book (Folger Shakespeare Library, call number V.a.456). Take a look at the whole issue here – Early...
From: Cooking in the Archives on 27 Feb 2021

The Duke's Mouthwash

 Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 8 Feb 2021

Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?

This month, we asked our contributors: With many different holidays and celebrations approaching, what is your favorite beverage known to have been consumed during... The post Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?...

The Feint That Never Happened: Unheralded Turning Point of the Philadelphia Campaign

By noon on Saturday, September 20, 1777, Gen. William Howe watched his window of opportunity to cross the shallowing upper fords of the Philadelphia... The post The Feint That Never Happened: Unheralded Turning Point of the Philadelphia Campaign appeared...

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 31 Jul 2020

Rosichiero Glass

Sunset over Venice(click image to enlarge)The most famous glass recipe in Antonio Neri’s 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, is “#129 Transparent Red.” The reason for its notoriety is, of course, the pure gold used as a pigment. Gold-ruby,...
From: Conciatore on 29 Jul 2020

Tartar Salt

So-called "wine diamonds," (harmless)Potassium bitartrate deposits which can accumulatein bottles and barrels of wineTartar salt is an example of an alchemist's chemical that is a byproduct of another process, in this case winemaking. In his...
From: Conciatore on 22 Apr 2020

Aggressive-Minded Gamblers: Washington, Howe, and the Days Between Battles, September 12–16, 1777

On Tuesday afternoon, September 16, 1777—five days after the Battle of Brandywine—George Washington and most of his 11,000-member Continental army stood atop the South... The post Aggressive-Minded Gamblers: Washington, Howe, and the Days...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.