The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "witches"

Showing 1 - 20 of 56

Your search for posts with tags containing witches found 56 posts

Cannibalism in the Kitchen: Jean de Léry’s L’Histoire mémorable de la ville de Sancerre (1574)

By Stephanie Shiflett In 1573, at the height of the Wars of Religion in France, Catholic forces besieged the Protestant town of Sancerre. The author Jean de Léry found himself caught there, watching as supplies dwindled and the populace grew increasingly...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Mar 2021

Powerful Bundles: The Materiality of Protection Amulets in Early Modern Switzerland

By Eveline Szarka If you shop around for a protection amulet today, you will most likely stumble upon ornamental jewellery. More often than not these pieces are round in shape, and pieces featuring Kabbalistic or runic symbols are especially popular....
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Sep 2020

Witch Hunt Podcast #History #Scotland

This is a truly fascinating and ground-breaking podcast on the Witch Hunt in Scotland. Six wonderful episodes are just starting here. This will go into the Witch Hunt as never before … https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p07sgq5s
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 8 Nov 2019

Elizabethan Witch Trials: More Evidence (and a Map)

Posted by Krista J. Kesselring, 30 June 2019. Most of what we know of accusations of felony witchcraft in early modern England comes from the few surviving assize court records, supplemented by printed news pamphlets that detailed some such trials. Judges...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 30 Jun 2019

Irish Renaissance Seminar at Ulster University – May 18th

“SHAKESPEARE, ULSTER, BEYOND” A meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar Saturday 18th May 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast For further information on this meeting of the IRS, please contact the organisers Kevin De Ornellas and Alisa...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 15 May 2019

Review: Macbeth at the Mill Theatre, Dundrum

Review: Macbeth at the Mill Theatre, Dundrum, Dublin, October 3rd-26th, 2018, directed by Geoff O’Keefe Review by Ema Vyroubalová, Trinity College Dublin. This was an engaging and fast-paced production, notable particularly for its rendering...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 27 Nov 2018

The Bewitched Wife’s Cure

Since it is Hallowe’en, in this post we look at how bodily waste: urine, hair, and nail clippings were common ingredients in spells, charms against something, and also in spells to remove other spells. V0025811ETC Witchcraft: a white-faced witch...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 31 Oct 2018

The Witches of Balmaclellan in Galloway #History #Scotland

The field preacher and minister Thomas Warner gave Wodrow an account of his discovery of witches in his parish in Galloway in c.1690. At least one of them was executed: ‘He gave me a long accompt of Witches, in his parish of Balmaclellan. A litle...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 17 Jul 2018

Mary Hicks Witch of Huntingdon

On 28 July 1716 Mary Hicks was condemned at the Huntingdon assizes for witchcraft and executed. According to the published narrative of her case, Mary dwelt in Huntingdon with her husband Edward and their 9-year-old daughter Elizabeth, the ‘Aple...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 11 Apr 2018

1692 Salem Witch Trials

In 1692 a group of adolescent girls in Salem Village, Massachusetts, became subject to strange fits after hearing tales told by a West Indian slave. They accused several women of being witches. The townspeople were appalled but not surprised: Belief in...
From: 17th-century American Women on 13 Mar 2018

Performing words #5: story

This post is part of a series on theatrical words. For an introduction to the series, see Performing words: introduction to a new thread on theatre and language. How much do we think about stories when we read, perform, produce, watch or study early...
From: Before Shakespeare on 7 Mar 2018

Star Chamber Stories: Elizabethan Witchcraft, Sorcery, and a Very Troubled Marriage

Posted by Krista Kesselring; 14 February 2018. As noted in my last post, stories from the Court of Star Chamber’s proceedings can offer remarkable glimpses into early modern law and everyday life. Given the wide, wide range of wrongs the court was...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 14 Feb 2018

New England's 1656 Witch Trial

History of Witches and Wizards, 1720Trials for witchcraft in New England did not begin in 1692.  In The Salem Witch Trials: a Reference Guide by K. David Goss, he recounts the trial of Anne Hibbins who was hanged in 1656. Anne Hibbins (1656) was...
From: 17th-century American Women on 30 Oct 2017

Female Fancy-Dress, 1609-198

I am so looking forward to Halloween night next Tuesday, not only because our long municipal nightmare will be over here in Salem for another year, but also because I actually do enjoy creative Halloween costumes, and they do appear on this night, glittering...
From: streets of salem on 26 Oct 2017

Lancaster Castle

Back in February, as part of the Embodiment and New Materialism conference in Lancaster, I was part of a drama workshop which took place in Lancaster Castle.  It was somewhere that I’d been intending to visit for a long time, but had somehow...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 3 May 2017

The Woodcut Witch

Witchcraft and witch trials are by no means an academic focus for me, but any European historian who studies and teaches the early modern era must take these subjects on. Consequently I developed an undergraduate course called “Magic and Witchcraft...
From: streets of salem on 28 Oct 2016

Illustrations of the Improv’d Garden

I discovered the prolific British illustrator Clare Melinsky just recently, and apparently too late to obtain the examples of her work that I covet the most: illustrations based on several eighteenth-century gardening manuals by clergyman John Laurence,...
From: streets of salem on 20 Jun 2016

Guest Post –

Alexandra Montgomery is a PhD Candidate in history at the University of Pennsylvania. She studies Indigenous and European boundary-setting and colonization schemes in the far northeast during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The following...
From: The Junto on 17 Feb 2016

Proctor’s Ledge and Pendle

If you’re even somewhat familiar with my blog you can probably tell that the Salem Witch Trials, both past and present, is a continuous preoccupation/irritant for me. This is as much due to my residence as my paradoxical perspective: as a historian...
From: streets of salem on 18 Jan 2016

The Strange and wonderful history of Mother Shipton

I am afraid I have been very unwell and ended up in hospital this week, so the post on flying witches hasn’t been finished. So in the interest of getting a post up on time (while also getting my prescribed rest) I am instead posting a small piece...
From: Enchanted History on 15 Nov 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.