The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "wood"

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Your search for posts with tags containing wood found 726 posts

Strangeness, Jacobean Drama, and Chester

On 23 April 1610, the city of Chester in the north-west of England inaugurated its new St George’s Day horse races on the surrounding fields known as the Roodee—a tradition that endures today.  To celebrate the occasion, a raft of...
From: Middling Culture on 16 Sep 2020

“I will take your Body and I will Tar it”

When I was posting about Henry Barnes’s conflict with his Marlborough neighbors in the summer of 1770, I looked for the text of the anonymous threatening letter he reported receiving in late June. But I couldn’t find that text and had to settle...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Aug 2020

The Gardener’s Labyrinth

I’m having this really neat synchronicity of research, writing and life right now, as I’m working on Chapter Three of my book, which is focused on Elizabethan horticulture. So I get up, water my garden, and then go upstairs into my study and...
From: streets of salem on 11 Aug 2020

Getting Out of Marlborough in 1775

When we left Capt. William Brown and Ens. Henry DeBerniere, they were in a back room of Henry Barnes’s house in Marlborough, listening as he tried to send away a member of the local committee of correspondence.Dr. Samuel Curtis had shown up that...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jul 2020

More Mild Mayhem in Marlborough

All right, now that I’ve calmed down from spotting William Benson staying out of the political dispute/gang brawl in Marlborough on 17 July 1770, I can move on to the people who were actually involved.The “Honest Ploughjogger” letter...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jul 2020

“Pitched upon for their leader and herald”

We’re looking at two accounts of what happened in Marlborough on the night of 17 July 2020. One, published in the Boston Evening-Post and quoted here, said that embattled importer Henry Barnes had promised free alcohol to his supporters, including...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Jul 2020

The Fine Art of Murder

Stephen Basdeo This website usually deals with the ‘fun’ side of crime history by discussing mobsters, outlaws, and highwaymen. Yet not all portrayals of crime and criminals were wild and brave characters as Walter Scott depicted them, and...

“A general aversion to truth, honesty, peace and good order”

Yesterday I quoted a letter published in the Boston Evening-Post and Boston Gazette in July 1770, alleging that supporters of the Marlborough importer Henry Barnes had roughed up a “young lad” with “edged weapons.” On 25 July someone...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jul 2020

Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775

No one disputes that the fighting that erupted at Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 ignited a war between Great Britain and her... The post Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

June 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “SICKLES, ready prepared for the Harvest.” As summer approached in 1770, James Hendricks announced to readers of the Pennsylvania Gazette that he had “ONE...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Jun 2020

Book Review by Emily K. Michael: Sherwood Smith’s Danse de la Folie

Lovers of Austen novels will find much delight in Sherwood Smith’s Danse de la Folie. With more wit than romance, this novel introduces two couples, mapping their relationships onto the quadrille. Smith’s attention to historical details, family...
From: Jane Austen's World on 6 Jun 2020

Elizabeth Woodcock – Buried in the snow in 1799

Born December 1756 in the small village of Impington, about 3 miles from Cambridge, Elizabeth Williams married her first husband, John Sockling and shortly after this they started their family, culminating in at least five children from 1785 onwards....
From: All Things Georgian on 13 May 2020

Covenanter Grave Fenwick (Fergushill & Woodburn) #History #Scotland

John Fergushill and George Woodburn, Fenwick, Fenwick parish, Ayrshire. Died 1685. Shields in 1690: ‘Lieu: Nisbet and his Party shot to death John Ferguson, George Whiteburn, and Patrick Gemmil in the parish of Finnick, the said year, 1685.’...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 8 May 2020

May 3

What advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Sign of the Hunting-Side-Saddle.” A striking image of a saddle embellished Elias Botner’s advertisement in the Postscript Extraordinary to the Pennsylvania Gazette...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 May 2020

Laughing in the Fern

Alain Manesson Mallet  1719,"Der Mont. – Lune"In Chapter 5 of L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri shows how to extract salt for glass from fern plants in an evocative recipe. Fern was and still is widely abundant in Tuscany. It presented a ready...
From: Conciatore on 1 May 2020

“Impowred to order and require so many days’ work yearly”

Yesterday I mentioned how colonial Boston selectmen’s records periodically include lists of the free black men in the town in connection with, of all things, highway repairs. Here’s more about that.Massachusetts militia laws excluded black...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Apr 2020

Leaving no Tracks By Robert Griffing.

Leaving no Tracks By Robert Griffing.https://lordnelsons.com/gallery/frontier/griffing/107LeavingNoTracks.htm
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Apr 2020

Soothing Sunburn

Mary Fleetwood has a recipe for easing sunburn in her manuscript recipe book. ‘A Water for Sun Burning’ Take a still full of snails, put to it 1 quart of Creame, 1 pint of white wine vinegar, 1/2 pound of bitter almonds, 6 limons, 1 handfull...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 8 Apr 2020

Covenanter Grave Doocot of Blackwood House #History #Scotland

John Brown, Blackwood, Lesmahagow parish, Lanarkshire. Died 1685. Shields: ‘Liev Murray, now Prisoner in Edin. with his party, Shot one John Broun, after quarters given at Blackwood in Clidsdale, Mar. 1685.’ (A Short Memorial, 37.) Stone erected...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 5 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.