The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "wood"

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Your search for posts with tags containing wood found 709 posts

Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough and William of Cloudeslie

By Stephen Basdeo Stories of Robin Hood have been popular since at least the late fourteenth century, as we know from William Langland’s Vision of Piers Plowman (c.1377). However, around the same time that the ‘rymes of Robyn Hode’ flourished,...

The Death of Lt. Michael Grosh: the Maryland Militia at Germantown

In the early hours of October 4, 1777, the Maryland militia trudged southward along the Old York Road in eastern Pennsylvania. In the distance... The post The Death of Lt. Michael Grosh: the Maryland Militia at Germantown appeared first on Journal of...

Sanditon, Episode 6: What the Hey?

The plot goes on, the plot goes on Twists keep pounding confusion to my brain La de da de de, la de da de da Inquiring Readers, I apologize for reworking Sonny and Cher lyrics and adding them to my recap of Sanditon: Episode Six, but when the Davies’...
From: Jane Austen's World on 10 Feb 2020

“Agree for the Powder to be brought Down to the Mole”

The start of the Revolutionary War changed New London merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr.’s business environment.For one thing, military supplies were much more valuable. On 25 Apr 1775 Shaw asked his connection in New York for “Five Hundred wt....
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2020

Something Splashing This Way Comes by John Buxton

Something Splashing This Way Comes by John Buxtonhttps://lordnelsons.com/gallery/frontier/buxton/66SomethingSplashing.htm
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 5 Feb 2020

Trading for Gunpowder Just Before the War

Last year I wrote about the New London, Connecticut, merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., and his many ways of evading Customs duties on molasses and other goods.Shaw’s experience moving molasses from the Caribbean to mainland North America was useful...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2020

January 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “For SPAIN, PORTUGAL, LONDON … The SHIP MARY.” Deciphering the copy in these advertisements may be difficult or even impossible, but the visual images remain...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Jan 2020

January 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Valuable PLANTATION … THIRTY VALUABLE NEGROES.” John Rose and Alexander Rose, administrators of the estate “of the deceased Dr. WILLIAM ROSE,” turned...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Jan 2020

“The whole Body consisting of about 1000 Men”

On 16 Jan 1770, the Boston Whigs circulated handbills for a new public meeting about non-importation. In Faneuil Hall, no less.The town’s merchants had launched the non-importation boycott back in 1768, as a response to the Townshend duties, and...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jan 2020

Is Dido Elizabeth Belle still buried at St George’s burial ground in Bayswater Road?

Today I am delighted to welcome an authority on the life of Dido Elizabeth Belle, Etienne Daly, whose name you have probably seen in previous articles about Dido. As part of his research into her life he has been taking a closer look at her death, more...
From: All Things Georgian on 22 Jan 2020

Non-Importation in the New Year

At the end of 1769, the Boston merchants’ non-importation agreement ran out. But the Townshend duties were still in effect, so the Whigs insisted on maintaining that boycott into the new year. That required leaning on people who wanted to resume...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jan 2020

The Fighting Ground “between the Enemy & the American force”

Asa Lord was born on 29 June 1760 in Saybrook, Connecticut. Around the time he turned sixteen, he signed up for a few months of military service, and he continued to do short-term stints as the war continued.Lord was eighteen years old in April 1779 when...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jan 2020

Raid on Isaac Hatfield’s House

As I described yesterday, in January 1780 Capts. Samuel Lockwood and Samuel Keeler of the Connecticut militia attacked the home of Isaac Hatfield, Jr., in Morrisania, New York. Hatfield (1748-1822) had been born in America to a substantial farming family...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2020

Capt. Samuel Lockwood at War

Samuel Lockwood (1737–1807, gravestone shown here courtesy of Find a Grave) of Greenwich, Connecticut, became a second lieutenant in the Continental Army in April 1775.That fall, he joined Gen. Richard Montgomery’s invasion of Canada. On 5...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2020

G.M. Woodward, Symptoms of the Shop, 1801

              George Murgatroyd Woodward was born in the parish of St Giles-in-the Fields in the spring of 1766. His father William was a successful surveyor who kept his offices in Lincoln’s Inn Fields. William...
From: The Print Shop Window on 9 Jan 2020

January 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Hart’s Vendue Store.” Relatively few eighteenth-century newspaper advertisements featured visual images. Most that did relied on woodcuts of ships, houses, horses,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Jan 2020

The Furniture of the Middling Sort

Many thanks to Chris Pickvance for this guest post on the furniture of the middling sort. You can hear Chris talk the team through a “middling” style chair in the video at the end of this post… You can also read more about furniture...
From: Middling Culture on 7 Jan 2020

Robert Erskine, Surveyor-General of the Continental Army

Robert Erskine was born in Dumfermline, Scotland, to Ralph and Margaret Erskine on September 7, 1735. Ralph Erskine, being a Presbyterian minister, raised Robert... The post Robert Erskine, Surveyor-General of the Continental Army appeared first on Journal...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.