The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "16th Century"

Showing 1 - 20 of 358

Your search for posts with tags containing 16th Century found 358 posts

Litany in a Time of Plague

Thomas Nashe (1567–1601) was an Elizabethan poet, playwright, and fiction author. He is chiefly remembered as the author of a picaresque novel titled The Unfortunate Traveller; or, The Life of Jack Wilton (1594) and several other minor pieces. The Black...

Thomas Fuller, The Historie of the Holy Warre (1651)

This is the third time our blog has featured a book by clergyman and royalist Thomas Fuller, showing the enduring popularity of his work among women readers. Our last post was about The Church History of Britain, a timely work with a historical account...

Henrick Peetersen van Middelburch, Den Bibel. Tgeheele Oude ende Nyeuwe Testament (1535)

Renske Hoff Between 1532 and 1546, the Antwerp printer Henrick Peetersen van Middelburch published two complete Dutch Bibles as well as multiple New Testaments. He did not initiate new translations or publication formats for his editions but efficiently...

King James Bible (1630)

Bibles were among the books most frequently owned in early modern households, and they have often featured on our blog. As Femke Molekamp has noted, “The Bible lay at the heart of early modern female reading culture” (1). While the Geneva...

The guilt, angst and joy of research

I recently read an article by the elusive Ryan Holiday, a professional book researcher. He made one very important point—at least to me. He said that the first step in researching is to acquire a research library which will include books that...
From: Baroque Explorations on 31 Oct 2020

The sixteenth-century Vasquine / Basquine: A corset, farthingale or Kirtle?

In her 2001 book The Corset: A Cultural History Valerie Steele claimed that vasquines and basquines were early types of corsets: “The other precursor of the corset was the basquine or vasquine, a laced bodice to which was attached a hooped skirt...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 28 Oct 2020

SCEMS Online Seminar Series 2020-2021

Choices and Projects For 2020–2021 we’re running an online seminar series based around two themes. Our Choices speakers have been invited to look back on their careers and discuss the choices they have made along the way. The kind of choices...
From: SCEMS on 12 Oct 2020

Frazzled much? The challenges of writing fact-based historical fiction

I’ve been stuck for nearly a week over a chapter in the WIP. (The whip, I think ruefully, as I type those letters.) The problem has many causes. One is that I have a stubborn need to know where-the-heck my heroine (Elizabeth Tudor, in this instance)...
From: Baroque Explorations on 19 Sep 2020

Talk: Body-makers and Farthingale-makers in Seventeenth-Century London

Hot on the heels on my talk on whalebone and early modern fashion, I recently gave another presentation about the work I’ve been doing on farthingale-makers and body-makers in late sixteenth and seventeenth-century London. This paper was given at...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 3 Sep 2020

Edmund Spenser, The Fairie Queene (1596)

By Alison Fraser While Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene was written for Queen Elizabeth I, the epic was meant for female readership beyond Elizabeth and offered early modern women “a remarkable degree of interpretive agency,”...

Tudor Archers 1549

 The Commotion Times are a living history group based on the West Country recreating the era of the Prayerbook Rebellion. Here are some of them practising the Longbow last weekend. Facebook pagePhoto Ed Fox
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 2 Sep 2020

The Assault Group 28mm Renaissance range

 Been enjoying the new book The Commotion Time - a military history of the Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549. So naturally I started thinking about wargaming it. When I posted about this before it was established the Assault Groups range was the best...
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 26 Aug 2020

Whalebone and Sixteenth Century Fashion

Recently I gave a talk on the use of whale baleen (otherwise known as whalebone) in fashion in sixteenth-century Europe, particularly England. The talk was recorded and is now online via the University of Melbourne Early Modern Circle website. Click on...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 20 Aug 2020

Out this week - for 16th century fans

Hoping to get this. A military history of the Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549. There is a fiver off for a limited time. https://www.helion.co.uk/military-history-books/the-commotion-time-tudor-rebellion-in-the-west-1549.php?sid=afb0923d968b6db493a342f31fe4b0e5
From: Wars of Louis Quatorze on 12 Aug 2020

On Plague, Sweating Sickness, and Covid-19

The novel I’m writing now is set in mid-16th century England. During this time period episodes of black plague and the quickly lethal “sweating sickness” came and went. With each epidemic, enormous numbers of people died. Long ago,...
From: Baroque Explorations on 24 Jul 2020

Seventeenth-Century Busks, Courtship and Sexual Desire

In 2014 my article on this subject was published by Gender & History and a subsequent blog post titled, ‘“He shall not haue so much as a buske-point from thee”: Examining notions of Gender through the lens of Material Culture’...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 18 Jul 2020

The Forme of Prayers and Ministration of the Sacraments (1561)

Today we highlight a scarce edition of the Book of Common Order, printed in 1561 in Geneva, Switzerland by Zacharie Durand and owned by Katherine Rouse. The book’s extended title is The Forme of Prayers and Ministration of the Sacraments, &c....

Dat oude ende dat nieuwe testament (The Old and New Testament, 1526)

By Renske Hoff The title page of this sixteenth-century Dutch Bible carries a simple ownership mark by Walburch van Manderschijt. This Bible, part of the special collections of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam (shelfmark: XC 05039), was printed...

“The Life and Death of Jacke Straw” (1593)

By Stephen Basdeo The following is an excerpt from my book: The Life and Legend of a Rebel Leader: Wat Tyler (2018). It is available to buy from the publisher here: Link. Wat Tyler’s rebellion in 1381 was the first large-scale uprising of the common...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.