The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "African American History"

Your search for posts with tags containing African American History found 18 posts

L’Ouverture High School: Race, Place, and Memory in Oklahoma

By Erica Johnson Edwards Growing up white in rural Oklahoma, I only had a few Black schoolmates, did not have any Black teachers, and did not learn about the Haitian Revolution. In fact, I only first learned about this world historical event during...
From: Age of Revolutions on 28 Sep 2020

BLM 2020: Breathing, Resistance, and the War Against Enslavement

By Kerry Sinanan On May 20, 2020 many celebrated the birthday of Haitian revolution leader, Toussaint L’Ouverture against a backdrop of ongoing murders of Black people at the hands of current and former police.[1] Ahmaud Arbery, shot while running...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Jun 2020

If We Can’t Picture Them, Were They There?

We don’t have any portraits of Salem women before the eighteenth century: the (European) women of Salem’s (European) founding century are therefore difficult to picture. We are left with nineteenth- and early twentieth-century romanticized...
From: streets of salem on 30 May 2020

African Americans and the Problems of Faith in the Age of Revolutions

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By James Sidbury The play on words embedded in the title...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Feb 2020

A Monumental Divide

At the center of Raleigh is the North Carolina Capitol building, in the midst of Capitol Square, surrounded by more than a dozen monuments to the memory of statesmen and soldiers. The most recent installation (1990) is the North Carolina Veterans Monument,...
From: streets of salem on 13 Jun 2019

Step it up, Salem

Nothing helps to define the distinguishing characteristics of where you live better than travel. I’ve been traveling quite a bit over the past year, near and far, in the US and abroad, but generally to places which are identified as tourist...
From: streets of salem on 12 May 2019

Black History is Salem History

I’m wrapping up February, a month in which educators have focused on African-American history since at least 1970, with a summary of some of the research in which I’ve been engaged and some links to some other initiatives and events in the...
From: streets of salem on 28 Feb 2019

First Monday Library Chat: The David Walker Lupton African American Cookbook Collection

Welcome to the September 2018 edition of the First Monday Library Chat. This month we travel to Tuscaloosa and speak with Kate Matheny, Reference Services & Outreach Coordinator for Special Collections at University of Alabama Libraries.   The...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Sep 2018

Challenging Lafayette’s Legacy: Race and Republicanism in France and the United States

This post is a part of the “Race and Revolution” Series. By Aurélia Aubert In March 1825, Achille Murat, a recent settler in Florida and nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte, heard that the Marquis de Lafayette was touring the United States.[1]...
From: Age of Revolutions on 23 Apr 2018

Crispus Attucks: American Revolutionary Hero?

This post is a part of the “Race and Revolution” Series. By Mitch Kachun Crispus Attucks is a name that twenty-first century American schoolchildren usually learn in their introduction to the American Revolution and its heroes. Attucks—a...
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Mar 2018

African-American History at the Phillips Library

On the occasion of the Martin Luther King holiday here in Salem and across the country, I thought I would highlight some sources for African-American history in the major repository for local history in our region, which is of course the PEM’s Phillips...
From: streets of salem on 15 Jan 2018

Guest Post: Review of the National Museum of African-American History and Culture

Guest poster Evelyne Martial is a retired civil rights attorney. She received her JD from the Cincinnati College of Law. She is currently enrolled in the Gender and Cultural Studies Program at Simmons College. Early on a cold, frigid morning in Washington,...
From: The Junto on 15 Mar 2017

Clarissa Lawrence of Salem

The intertwined histories of Salem’s African-American community and Abolitionist movement in the mid-nineteenth century are often referenced and represented by the work of two strong women, Charlotte Forten Grimké (1837-1914) and Sarah Parker...
From: streets of salem on 28 Aug 2016

Teaching Trauma: Narrative and the Use of Graphic Novels in Discussing Difficult Pasts

Roy Rogers kicked off yesterday’s 4-day roundtable with a review of the graphic novel Rebel. For day two of our roundtable on graphic novels and history, I will discuss the use of graphic novels in teaching traumatic histories. As anyone who...
From: The Junto on 14 Jul 2015

On Remembrance and Resurrection: Commemorating Portsmouth’s (NH) African Burying Ground

“I am the resurrection and the life.” This passage from John 11.25 comes the Bible passage describing Lazarus’s miraculous rise from the death, as he addressed Martha, the sister of Lazarus. For Christians, this lesson is supposed to...
From: The Junto on 1 Jun 2015

Teaching Schoolchildren with Historic Recipes

Amanda Moniz  Last February, I visited the Washington Middle School for Girls, a Catholic school serving girls from underprivileged backgrounds in Washington, D.C., to make cookies from the first African American cookbook, published by Malinda Russell...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Sep 2014

Review: Native Apostles: Black and Indian Missionaries in the British Atlantic World

On the eve of the American Revolution, an unlikely band of ministers and benefactors devised a plan to send John Quamine, a free black man, and Bristol Yamma, a slave, as missionaries to Africa. The project was conceived by the two would-be missionaries...
From: The Junto on 26 Nov 2013

"A peculiar fact about his house servants was that we were all related to one another, and as a..."

“A peculiar fact about his house servants was that we were all related to one another, and as a matter of fact we did not need to know that we were slaves.” - Fascinating statement made by the Rev. Mr. Peter Fossett (1815-1901) recalling life as a...
From: Revolutionary Thoughts on 1 Sep 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.