The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Archives"

Showing 1 - 20 of 531

Your search for posts with tags containing Archives found 531 posts

Around the Table: Museum Chat

Welcome to the latest Around the Table! Today we have a chat about the recipes-related collections at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., especially the National Museum of American History (NMAH)! I am delighted to speak with Ashley Rose...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Mar 2021

Who’s Counting?

I am right on the verge of completing my manuscript for submission to the publisher, but I had to stop because something is bothering me and I need to “write it out”. That process describes quite a few of my blog posts, actually. Last week...
From: streets of salem on 22 Feb 2021

Digging Up Derby Square

I was researching Salem’s struggle with/against urban renewal in the 1960s when I came across a massive collection of photographs from the career collection of Edmund Bacon, the famous Philadelphia city planner who is sometimes referred to as representing...
From: streets of salem on 12 Feb 2021

A Missing Link for New College Puddings

By Helga Müllneritsch Almost nothing is known about the creators of the Begbrook Manuscript (AC 1420). It was purchased in the nineteenth century by the collector Daniel Parsons (1811-1887), and his collection was probably given to the Downside Abbey...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Jan 2021

Murder in Sanctuary: Liberty Jurisdictions and the Prosecution of Felony in Early Tudor England

Posted by Shannon McSheffrey, 19 January 2021. Figure 1: Timeline of Homicides in St Martin le Grand, 1508-17. Between 1508 and 1517, a string of six homicides occurred within the precinct of the collegiate church of St. Martin le Grand. Located...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 19 Jan 2021

Tales from the Archives: Was There a Recipe for Korean Ginseng?

By Daniel Trambaiolo As all of us continue to watch the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, and wait with cautious optimism for a time when we can heal and recover, I’d like to take a moment to revisit another medical breakthrough that required patience of...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Dec 2020

The Suffrage Seekers

I’m not going to write much on this #SalemSuffrageSaturday: I prefer to let one document speak for itself—or its signatories. Election Day is three days away, and if it is a struggle to get all the votes counted we can and should be reminded...
From: streets of salem on 31 Oct 2020

How to Get Ahead in Early Modern London’s Maritime World

Early modern London was a port city, which sat at the centre of England’s international networks of colonial and commercial venture. However, London’s maritime operations were underpinned by working communities that were situated just beyond...
From: Middling Culture on 26 Oct 2020

Project Update

LIKE MOST OTHER THINGS, work on this project is being somewhat delayed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Although I do have some source images to work from, with the National Records of Scotland’s (mysterious? certainly steadfast) decision to remain shut...
From: Reading Rebel Voices on 19 Oct 2020

August

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “ALL the STOCK of GOODS.” Most advertisements in eighteenth-century newspapers ran multiple times.  Compositors set the type once and then used it over and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 22 Aug 2020

Lettice Greene of Stratford-upon-Avon and her World

Lettice Greene, like the majority of women in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, led a life in which her social status was determined by her male relatives. The life of her husband, Thomas Greene, was very well documented, particularly during the...
From: Middling Culture on 14 Aug 2020

August 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week (or last week)? “The Price of FLOUR.” The new semester will soon begin.  With it, undergraduate students will once again make contributions to the Adverts 250...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Aug 2020

Revisiting Jennifer Sherman Roberts’ Little Shop of Horrors, Early Modern Style

Today, I wanted to visit the work of a long-time contributor and dear friend of the Recipes Project – Jennifer Sherman Roberts. Jen has authored more than a dozen wonderful posts on the blog covering topics such as “The CIA’s Secret...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Jul 2020

Revisiting Marieke Hendriksen’s Indigo or no indigo?

Today we revisit a post written in pre-Covid-19 times, when borders were open, planes were flying and we used to travel the world. In this post from 2018, Marieke Hendriksen recounts how her holiday in Laos offered opportunities to learn more about indigo...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Jul 2020

Repertory and Reputation at the Curtain

Adeola Ogunbadewa is a research intern at the School of English at the University of Kent, where she is going into her final year reading for a BA in Spanish and Religious Studies.  She has been working on a project to develop a timeline of...
From: Before Shakespeare on 20 Jul 2020

Revisiting David Shields’ American Bitters

With summer in full swing, many of us are enjoying an Aperol Spritz (or 2) in our gardens or on our tiny balconies. To give you something to ponder as you sip your drink, today we revisit David Shields’ wonderful post on American Bitters. Here,...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Jul 2020

Revisiting Laurence Totelin’s Fevers and the Dog Star in Antiquity

Well, the Dog Days of summer are upon us once again…To help us cope with the heat, we revisit Laurence Totelin’s wonderful post from 2018.  In “Fevers and the Dog Star in Antiquity”, Laurence tells us about the origins of...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Jul 2020

Revisiting He Bian’s Fetch Me at Pearl Nest Street: Rhubarb Pills as Panacea in Qing China

Today we revisit He Bian’s fascinating post from 2018. Here, He tells us about the global trade in Chinese rhubarb (dahuang) roots, panaceas and notions of difference in premodern theories of the body. Fascinated by this post and want to learn more...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Jul 2020

Online Archives Unlocked: What’s in it for Crime Historians?

By Cassie Watson; posted 13 June 2020. At a time when none of us can go to any archive, I decided to investigate the online contents of collections made temporarily available to university staff and students during the Covid-19 pandemic. I also purchased...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 13 Jun 2020

Page 1 of 27123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.