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Search Results for "Bath"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Bath found 137 posts

For the Teacher: Creating an online high school class project on Northanger Abbey that engages students

The Matthews Project Introduction: Inquiring readers, The teacher who supervised the creation of this project, Ben John Wiebracht, contacted Vic Sanborn of Jane Austen’s World in the summer of 2020 to propose a research project his students would...
From: Jane Austen's World on 2 May 2021

“Revealing Recipes” Workshop Video Now Available

The 2021 “Revealing Recipes: Top Tips from Early Modern Women” workshop is now available  here. Hosted by the Wellcome Collection and organized in tandem the Royal College of Physicians, the event kicked off EMROC’s annual transcribathon,...
From: emroc on 23 Apr 2021

Book Review and Giveaway for A Most Clever Girl by Jasmine A. Stirling

In light of Women’s History Month, I’m pleased to share my review of a beautiful new book by Jasmine A. Stirling that is sure to delight the hearts of Jane Austen fans of all ages entitled A Most Clever Girl: How Jane Austen Found Her Voice....
From: Jane Austen's World on 22 Mar 2021

Turnspit Dogs

When I visited Bath in the U.K., I made a point of seeing No. 1 Royal Crescent, a fascinating museum whose interior was decorated in the Georgian style in the late 18th century/early 19th century. One had the feeling when entering the house that it may...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Feb 2021

Pretty please…

Have you ever attended an EMROC event? Are you planning to attend our transcribathon on 4 March 2021?  If you said yes to either, then please fill in our super-short, anonymous survey so we can get to know a bit more about our community. It takes...
From: emroc on 21 Feb 2021

It cost me a cold

Travelling and bathing In June 1645 John Evelyn travelled from Rome to Venice. The journey left him extremely weary and so he decided to visit the ‘Bagnias’ to take a bath. He described the experience as follows: [The bath] treat after the...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 7 Oct 2020

“The Riot is Only in Your Own Brain”

Was the riot mentioned in Northanger Abbey based on a real uprising? Or was it only in Eleanor's brain, as her brother Henry Tilney claimed?
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Aug 2020

The end of a European union

A decades-long union of European countries is supported by the respective national elites; but its destruction comes through the ruthless exploitation of popular nationalism by an autocratic leader. Does that sound familiar? It is, of course, the Kalmar...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

Jane Austen Virtual Event-BRLSI, July 4,

The Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institute (BRLSI). BRLSI is a respected non profit organization set up 200 years ago as a centre for Enlightenment ideas and intellectual discussion in Bath, England (where Jane Austen lived!). The Institute is having...
From: Jane Austen's World on 2 Jul 2020

John Church Dempsey (1802-1877), artist

John Church Dempsey found his way on to my radar as we have previously looked at a couple of his paintings, ‘Black Charley‘ and ‘Jemmy, The Rockman‘ and so, I wanted to find out a little more about his life. John was baptised in...
From: All Things Georgian on 22 Apr 2020

A Tradition of the Covenanter in Turnhigh, near Whitburn #History #Scotland

In his book Melodies and Memories: with a history of the Blacks of Briech Water (1909), John Black refers to a classic traditional story of a Covenanter being saved from a sword thrust by his Bible. He begins it with Helen Steel in Turnhigh, who was married...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 10 Apr 2020

Recipes and Remote Teaching, the EMROC Way

By Hillary Nunn Suddenly taking your class online? EMROC can help! Campus coronavirus responses are bringing huge unexpected changes to many classes, forcing us to think about ways of sharing knowledge across distances. We never planned it this way, but...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Mar 2020

Sanditon, Episodes One & Two Review: PBS Masterpiece: as inspired by Jane Austen’s last unfinished novel

Sanditon on PBS Masterpiece exceeded my expectations in some respects and not in others. It seems that a mixed reaction to this mini-series is not unusual. Many viewers in the UK loved it. Many did not. Some loathed it. Reading and hearing the opinions...
From: Jane Austen's World on 13 Jan 2020

At the Seaside in Regency England: A Poem from “News from Worthing,” 1807

Inquiring readers, Happy New Year! Are U.S. Austen fans ready for the countdown to Sanditon on PBS? Only 11 days remain until this eight-episode mini-series based on Jane Austen’s final novel fragment airs on Sunday nights. You can also stream each...
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Jan 2020

Our New Year’s Resolution: More Searchable Recipe Manuscripts

The year 2019 ended with some exciting news. Six new recipe manuscript transcriptions have now been vetted and uploaded into LUNA’s Folger Manuscript Transcription Collections.  This now makes recipes from 49 different manuscripts made searchable...
From: emroc on 31 Dec 2019

Around the Table: Events

By Sarah Peters Kernan Two weeks ago the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) hosted their fifth annual Transcribathon. I want to share my Transcribathon experience at the site hosted by the Newberry Library in Chicago, as I learned this event...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Nov 2019

Representation and Reality: Promoting the undertaking trade in late eighteenth century Bath

This guest post comes from Dr Dan O’Brien Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Death and Society, University of Bath. A man with closed eyes walking into a skeletal death figure, a group of anxious undertakers run after them. Coloured...
From: We-hang-out-a-lot-in-cemeteries on 6 Nov 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.