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Your search for posts with tags containing Book review found 678 posts

Book Review: ‘The Imprisoned Princess” by Catherine Curzon

When Queen Anne died in 1714, her throne should have passed to her younger brother, James (son of James II of England & VII of Scotland and Mary of Modena). But since James was a Catholic and the Act of Settlement of 1701 (during the reign of William...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 9 Jun 2021

Ferling Reputations for Clinton and Cornwallis

I claim only a basic knowledge of the southern campaigns of the Revolutionary War, but I’ve long had the impression that these are the standard assessments of two British commanders:Gen. Lord Cornwallis, despite losing at Yorktown, was a competent commander...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Jun 2021

Review of Jane Austen: The Missing Pieces by Harvey T. Dearden

Inquiring readers: Not only did I enjoy reading Jane Austen: The Missing Pieces, but spent many silent hours debating with its author, Harvey T. Dearden, agreeing or disagreeing with his points of view, and thinking back on my history of reading about...
From: Jane Austen's World on 30 May 2021

Don’t major publishers use fact checkers or copyeditors anymore?

Trying to write a comprehensive history of science up to the scientific revolution in a single volume is the historian of science’s equivalent to squaring the circle. It can’t actually be done, it must fall short in various areas, but doesn’t prevent...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 26 May 2021

Book Review: The Firefly Witch by Amanda Hughes

I’ve had The Firefly Witch on my bookshelf since it was published a few years ago and I finally had a chance to read it – and I’m glad I did. Set in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1662, we meet Circe: a red-haired girl with an amazing...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 12 May 2021

BOOK REVIEW: JANE AUSTEN’S BEST FRIEND

I’ve always been intrigued by the friendship between Jane Austen and Martha Lloyd. (Who wouldn’t want to be close friends with Jane Austen?) When I saw Zöe Wheddon’s new book, Jane Austen’s Best Friend: The Life and Influence...
From: Jane Austen's World on 10 May 2021

Review of Resisting Independence: Popular Loyalism in the Revolutionary British Atlantic by Brad A. Jones (2020)

Review by Kacy Dowd Tillman Jones, Brad A. Resisting Independence: Popular Loyalism in the Revolutionary British Atlantic. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2020. 324 pp. Resisting Independence by Brad A. Jones explores loyalism as it played...
From: Age of Revolutions on 28 Apr 2021

Kill or Cure!

One of the defining aspects of the so-called scientific revolution was the massive increase in experimentation as a method to discover or confirm knowledge of the natural world, replacing the empirical observation or experience of Aristotelian scientia....
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 28 Apr 2021

Review of Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World by Jessica Marie Johnson

Reviewed by Crystal Nicole Eddins Johnson, Jessica Marie. Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020. 360 pp. Deeply textured stories of women’s agency emerge...
From: Age of Revolutions on 26 Apr 2021

Wounded Feelings: How to Sue for Emotional Distress (Review)

Katie Barclay Eric H. Reiter, Wounded Feelings: Litigating Emotions in Quebec, 1870-1950 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press for the Osgood Society for Canadian Legal History, 2019), pp. 482 + xiii. This week as I write this (much delayed – sorry...
From: Borealia on 26 Apr 2021

Review of The Secret Life of Miss Mary Bennet, and an Interview with Author Katherine Cowley

Vic’s Review Imagine a mystery novel that features Mary Bennet as its investigative heroine! Author Katherine Cowley’s choice of Mary, the largely unnoticed Bennet daughter in Pride and Prejudice, piqued my interest. While Cowley kept some...
From: Jane Austen's World on 18 Apr 2021

Sovereignty and the Haitian Revolution in Jean Casimir’s The Haitians: A Decolonial History

Reviewed by Julia Gaffield Casimir, Jean. The Haitians: A Decolonial History. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2020. 452 pp. Can we really say that the Haitian Revolution was a success? We’ve all heard the question....
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Mar 2021

Book Review: ‘The World of Isaac Newton’ by Toni Mount

Isaac Newton is one of the most well-known personages of the Stuart and Georgian periods for his towering intellect and his role with the Royal Society. When we think of those amazingly multi-talented Stuart people, Newton is definitely one of them. Toni...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 23 Mar 2021

Book Review and Giveaway for A Most Clever Girl by Jasmine A. Stirling

In light of Women’s History Month, I’m pleased to share my review of a beautiful new book by Jasmine A. Stirling that is sure to delight the hearts of Jane Austen fans of all ages entitled A Most Clever Girl: How Jane Austen Found Her Voice....
From: Jane Austen's World on 22 Mar 2021

A flawed survey of science and the occult in the Early Modern Period

There is no shortage of good literature on the relationships between science and magic, or science and astrology, or science and alchemy during the Early Modern Period so what is new in Mark A. Waddell’s Magic, Science, and Religion in Early Modern...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 3 Mar 2021

Book Review: ‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton

‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton follows the story of Barbara Villiers from her adolescence, her passionate relationship with her first love, Philip Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, through her marriage to Roger Palmer, her notorious...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 25 Feb 2021

Review: THE STEEL BENEATH THE SILK by Patricia Bracewell

The wait was definitely worth it.THE STEEL BENEATH THE SILK (Bellastoria Press, March 2) caps off Patricia Bracewell's trilogy on eleventh-century Emma of Normandy, Queen of England, with all the drama, emotion, and skill that fans of the series have...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 22 Feb 2021

Review of a book I have not read and have absolutely no intention of wasting money on!

Timon Screech is an art historian, who is professor for Japanese art of the Early Modern Period at SOAS in London. He is the author of numerous books and in his newest publication has decided to turn his hand to the history of astronomy at the beginning...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 3 Feb 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.