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Search Results for "Bunker Hill"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Bunker Hill found 160 posts

Lt. Col. Abijah Brown in the Fight

After Lt. Col. Abijah Brown and his Waltham company reported to the Massachusetts army at Cambridge in late May 1775, there was a question of what regiment they should belong to.As of 19 April, Brown was a major in Thomas Gardner’s Middlesex County...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 May 2021

“The Horse so furnished was Killed at the Battle”

Yesterday I discussed Richard Gridley’s petitions to the post-war Continental Congress to keep compensating him for the loss of his Crown pension from the previous wars. Both Gridley and the Congress were caught in the 1780s economy, when there...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 May 2021

“A view or plan of the battle of Bunker’s hill”

On 10 May 1816, the Wilkesbarre Gleaner newspaper, published by Charles Miner, announced a discovery about the Battle of Bunker Hill, more than forty years earlier. According to a reprint in Niles’s Weekly Register the following month, it said:...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Apr 2021

The Lost DeBerniere Manuscripts

On 30 June 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was promoted to the rank of lieutenant in the 10th Regiment of Foot. Nine months later, on 17 March 1776, he evacuated Boston with the rest of the British military. That departure was rushed enough that Lt. DeBerniere...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Apr 2021

Dr. Jeffries and Dr. Warren

When I started looking at Dr. John Jeffries’s records of caring for young smallpox inoculatees in June 1775, I hoped to find clues to his whereabouts during that month.For almost two hundred years at least, a story has circulated about Jeffries...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2021

African Americans in the American Revolution

Editor’s note: Originally published in JAR in May 2013, the late Thomas Fleming (1927–2017) wrote this important article about the contribution of African Americans... The post African Americans in the American Revolution appeared first on...

Digging into the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown

I was intrigued by the Massachusetts Historical Council’s webpage for the archeological site of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown.As the page explains, Charlestown was settled in 1629, the year before Boston, and that site was originally the...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jan 2021

“Major Scarborough Gridley guilty of a breach of orders”

On 24 Sept 1775, Maj. Scarborough Gridley’s career in the Continental Army came to an end.Gridley was the fourth-ranking officer in the artillery regiment. More important, he was the son of the regimental commander, Col. Richard Gridley.When the...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Sep 2020

“Remissness and backwardness” at Bunker Hill

On 13 Aug 1775, Gen. George Washington issued orders for a court-martial to take place the following day with Gen. Nathanael Greene presiding. The defendant was Col. John Mansfield (1721-1809) of Lynn. Three junior officers in his regiment had accused...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Sep 2020

“The Struggle for Freedom” Webinar, 15 and 24 Sept.

The National Parks of Boston and two of the city’s historic house museums, the Shirley-Eustis House in Roxbury and the Gibson House Museum in the Back Bay, have teamed up to offer a free online presentation on “The Struggle for Freedom: Patriots...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Sep 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Derrick E. Lapp on the Bunker Hill Effect

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews VMI and University of Maryland, Baltimore graduate Derrick E. Lapp on the “Bunker Hill Effect” on decision... The post This Week on Dispatches: Derrick E. Lapp on the Bunker...

The Fall of Fort Washington: The “Bunker Hill Effect”?

It was the one of the worst defeats suffered by the Americans during the War for Independence, certainly the worst over which George Washington... The post The Fall of Fort Washington: The “Bunker Hill Effect”? appeared first on Journal of...

Swett’s Collection of Bunker Hill Documents

Last year I wrote about a three volumes of recollections about the Battle of Bunker Hill taken down in 1825 that went missing in the late nineteenth century.Samuel Swett (1782-1866, shown here) consulted that collection, but he also assembled a file...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jun 2020

New Publications from the Journal of the American Revolution

I came across the 1818 recollections of the Battle of Bunker Hill that I shared last week while writing a new article for the Journal of the American Revolution website: “Who Said, ‘Don’t Fire Till You See the Whites of Their Eyes’?”Way...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jun 2020

Another Recovered Source on Bunker Hill

In late 1825 the historian Samuel Swett sent the Boston Daily Advertiser two accounts of the Battle of Bunker Hill sworn to before a Newburyport magistrate in 1818. I shared one yesterday.The other was undoubtedly published in the Boston Daily Advertiser...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jun 2020

Bringing Back a Source on the Bunker Hill Battle

Samuel Swett was one of the early historians of the Battle of Bunker Hill. He published a long essay titled “Historical and Topographical Sketch of Bunker Hill Battle” as an appendix to an 1818 reprint of David Humphreys’s biography...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jun 2020

Who Said, “Don’t Fire Till You See the Whites of Their Eyes”?

“Don’t fire till you see the whites of their eyes!” is one of the most famous quotations to come out of the Revolutionary War. According... The post Who Said, “Don’t Fire Till You See the Whites of Their Eyes”?...

How Malden Managed “Our Cannon”

On 21 Apr 1775, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s Committee of Safety officially set up its artillery regiment by sending for Richard Gridley, Scarborough Gridley, and David Mason, three of the top four officers in that unit.At the same time...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jun 2020

It’s in the Details: A Recently Identified View of Boston

The exceedingly rare mezzotint of His Excellency George Washington Esqr (above) listed by Charles Hart as no. 1 in his Catalogue of the Engraved Portraits of... The post It’s in the Details: A Recently Identified View of Boston appeared...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.