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Search Results for "Byzantine Science"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Byzantine Science found 27 posts

Monks Using Astronomical Instruments

The manuscript Ambrosiana H 57 sup. includes two texts on the astrolabe, Philoponus’s as well as an anonymous one from perhaps the late 13th century (though this copy is dated 14th century). Along with these texts are a couple Ptolemaic works and...
From: Darin Hayton on 26 Jan 2021

Byzantine Tables of Planetary Hours

The tradition of planetary hours established a ruling planet for each hour of each day. The first hour of the day was ruled by the planet that also gave the day its name, e.g., the sun ruled the first hour of Sunday. Each subsequent hour was ruled by...
From: Darin Hayton on 23 Jan 2021

Missing Archives

Not a day goes by that I don’t miss being able to work in the archives. Travel restrictions that prevent me from going to and working in the archives I need for my research depresses me, to say the least. The fact that there is no end in sight compounds...
From: Darin Hayton on 12 Jan 2021

Astrology: Bugbear of Science

A recent survey of the “Conceptions of Science in Byzantium” opens with a general comment about the term “science”, and by extension the concept “science”. The author roots “science” in the culturally specific...
From: Darin Hayton on 2 Jan 2021

Aphorism 75 and the Challenges for a Critical Edition

Critical editions are incredibly handy. They transform historical artifacts into an easily read, generic version of some text. They smooth out differences between versions, they correct grammar, and they normalize orthography. The labors of intrepid and...
From: Darin Hayton on 4 Dec 2020

Byzantine Astrolabe (sort of)

In a fragment attributed to John Kamateros on the astrolabe are a handful of interesting diagrams illustrating the various parts of an astrolabe. Here is the diagram showing the rete. An illustration of an astrolabe’s rete, found in a 15th-century...
From: Darin Hayton on 20 Jan 2020

The Earth’s Shadow

Illustration of the earth casting a shadow, from BL Royal MS 16C XII, for. 46v. Today’s image comes once again from the many diagrams in BL Royal MS 16 C XII. This particular drawing illustrates how the earth’s shadow is cast by the sun. I...
From: Darin Hayton on 2 Dec 2019

Interesting Planetary Diagram

The standard geocentric model assumed that the planets were arranged out from the center, the earth, according to the period of revolution. On this assumption, the shorter the period, the closer the planet was to the stationary, central Earth.[1] Claudius...
From: Darin Hayton on 19 Nov 2019

The Byzantine Astrolabe

I can’t reconstruct how I came across this page, but now that I have I can’t let it go without some comment. A search for the pair of terms “Brescia astrolabe” or “Byzantine astrolabe” gives as the second result a link...
From: Darin Hayton on 6 Oct 2019

Filed under “Amusing Diversion”

Working through a manuscript I came across this folio with a large diagram of the zodiac in the center. A folio from a 14th-c. astrological manuscript, with a large diagram of the signs in the middle. What caught my attention was the drawing in the upper...
From: Darin Hayton on 4 Oct 2019

More Ὁ Καρπός Fun

Here is the next group of ten aphorisms, 21–30, from the copy of Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός in BNF gr. 2180. Idiosyncrasies continue to be the norm. As is common in this text, along with the orthographic tendency...
From: Darin Hayton on 10 Mar 2018

Aphorisms 11–20 from Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός

Here are aphorisms 11–20 from the copy of Ptolemy’s “Ὁ Καρπός” in BnF gr. 2180. As to be expected, there are a number of idiosyncrasies here, some going well beyond the orthographic changes...
From: Darin Hayton on 24 Feb 2018

ὁ Καρπός, Aphorisms 6 – 1

As our reader continued to work through Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός he either was uninterested in the minor errors in the Greek or didn’t notice them (such as the τοῦ γενεθλίω...
From: Darin Hayton on 16 Feb 2018

Aphorisms 4 and 5 from Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός

Let’s follow our reader through a couple more aphorisms from Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός. Again he glosses most of the Greek with Latin translations and, once again, corrects a couple scribal errors by writing the...
From: Darin Hayton on 13 Feb 2018

More fun with Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός

Our premodern reader didn’t just add Latin glosses to his copy of Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός, now and then he emended the Greek. For example, on the second aphorism the copiest wrote “τὴν κρεῖττον”....
From: Darin Hayton on 11 Feb 2018

Struggling with Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός

It is perversely reassuring to see that other people have had to labor to understand Ptolemy’s aphorisms.[1] Consequently, this 15th-century copy of Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός (more widely known by its Latin title,...
From: Darin Hayton on 9 Feb 2018

A Wolf-Headed Byzantine Veterinarian

A wolf-headed man binds a horse’s leg in this illustration “On Fractures” from a 15th-century copy of the “Hippiatrica”, University of Leiden, VSQ 50, fol. 68r.The Hippiatrica assembles treatments for a wide range of ailments...
From: Darin Hayton on 21 Dec 2016

Byzantine Structure of the Cosmos

A diagram showing the nature of the cosmos from earth at the center to God at the top, passing through the various levels‚—e.g., the elements, ether, angles—from a 16th-century copy of Nicephorus Blemmydes’ “Epitome physica”...
From: Darin Hayton on 19 Dec 2016

A Byzantine form of Geomancy?

A figure that correlates the planets, signs of the zodiac, and figures, which seems to be related to some geomancy of some form. “Cleromancy,” Harley MS 5596, fol. 4v.This illustration from a 15th-century manuscript seems to be a type of geomantic...
From: Darin Hayton on 17 Dec 2016

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