The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "COVID"

Showing 1 - 20 of 25

Your search for posts with tags containing COVID found 25 posts

Shameless Romantic Clickbait

Would Jane Austen have voted for Brexit? Worse, would she be a COVID conspiracy theorist? How is William Wordsworth like Nigel Farage? Does the possibly apocryphal ‘fact’ that Byron wore multiple corsets (at once?) make him loveable...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 14 Apr 2021

The end of “churlish winter’s tyranny”: February in Shakespeare’s Stratford

A swan on the Avon by Shakespeare’s church Not many people are sorry to see the end of February, and with it the end of meteorological winter. If we’re lucky it’s also the end of what Shakespeare called “churlish winter’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 28 Feb 2021

Missing Archives

Not a day goes by that I don’t miss being able to work in the archives. Travel restrictions that prevent me from going to and working in the archives I need for my research depresses me, to say the least. The fact that there is no end in sight compounds...
From: Darin Hayton on 12 Jan 2021

Stratford in November’s lockdown,

The River Avon and Royal Shakespeare Theatre as the sun sets, November 2020. Photo by Richard Morris November 2020 is drawing to a close in Stratford-upon-Avon, and although we haven’t yet experienced the cold of winter “when blood is nipped”,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 29 Nov 2020

Lord Mayor’s Show 1620 live-tweet

Due to COVID-19, this year’s Lord Mayor’s Show in the City of London has been cancelled. While the modern pageantry is off, the Civic London team are giving you the opportunity to enjoy the sights and sounds of the 1620 Show with a live-tweet...

Home is Where Everything Is

I can’t get through the 2020 Year of Blogging on #SalemSuffrageSaturdays, historic houses, and the occasional book-inspired post alone: the most important place for everyone this year was the home, and so I need to show you more of mine to be true...
From: streets of salem on 20 Oct 2020

Project Update

LIKE MOST OTHER THINGS, work on this project is being somewhat delayed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Although I do have some source images to work from, with the National Records of Scotland’s (mysterious? certainly steadfast) decision to remain shut...
From: Reading Rebel Voices on 19 Oct 2020

Coronavirus 2020? Nope. The Speckled Monster of 1764

In January 1764, a “speckled monster” struck Boston, forcing businesses to shutter and residents to isolate themselves in their homes or flee the city... The post Coronavirus 2020? Nope. The Speckled Monster of 1764 appeared first on Journal...

Unfreezing the statue: rescuing the arts

It is always said that “The show must go on”. But since 16 March 2020 when theatres and other cultural venues closed, shows have not gone on. And while shops and pubs are now able to open again, live performances are not allowed, and no timetable...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Jul 2020

Travel and Quarantine in the 19th Century

Amongst the many impacts of COVID-19 has been the devastation of the travel industry, and its knock-on effects on the global economy. We are all having to think carefully about the ways we travel, not only internationally, but even around our own countries...
From: DrAlun on 29 May 2020

Plague and pageantry

The project team are currently working remotely whilst archives and libraries are closed due to the COVID pandemic. Our project covers a period in history when epidemic disease was a regular event, especially in overcrowded London. The city’s population...

Staying Home With Jane, by Rachel Dodge

Inquiring readers: Covid-19 has meant making changes for us and our families, friends, and co-workers world wide. Rachel Dodge wrote this lovely article regarding stay-at-home activities in Jane Austen’s era that are still practiced. I think we...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 May 2020

Read Daniel Defoe’s Relatable Frustration at Fellow Citizens Failing to Observe ‘Social Distancing’ in ‘A Journal of a Plague Year’ (1722)

As the Covid-19 continues to hold the world in Lockdown much attention has turned to Daniel Defoe’s 1722 text, A Journal of Plague Year. Masquerading as a ‘real’ journal written in 1665, Defoe’s heavily-researched fiction proved...

How the Black Death reshaped Medieval England

Jane Whittle was approached by History Extra to take part in a podcast after the publication of her article by The Many-headed Monster You can listen to it on History Extra -The Black Death and social change and find further details with links to more...
From: Forms of Labour on 22 Apr 2020

Virtue in crisis: Enlightenment perspectives

With frightening speed, COVID-19 has brought about a global crisis. In western democracies the phenomenon was first tracked and measured from a distance, then discovered to be not just ‘their’ problem, but ‘ours’ too. In the process,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 20 Apr 2020

Canadian History After COVID-19

Denis McKim Thomas Paine likened the American Revolution to the deluge. In much the same way that God had hit the “reset button” on history itself through the flood recounted in Genesis, the United States had initiated a new epoch by revolting...
From: Borealia on 20 Apr 2020

Great Lives, the perfect pandemic podcast

Donald Wright When we received instructions to distance and isolate, I called my 92-year old mother who lives alone in another province. She seemed to be taking the pandemic in stride. “I survived the Depression, the war, and the energy crisis,”...
From: Borealia on 13 Apr 2020

CovidTheatre: A German Update

A lot has happened since my last attempt to catalogue what theatres in the German-speaking world are offering online while we’re all in self-isolation, so rather than update the old post, I’m doing a proper second edition.Here goes. Rather...
From: dispositio on 13 Apr 2020

Leadership matters in the first days and weeks of an outbreak: lessons from the Great Plague of Marseille, 300 years later

It seems as though American society has all but ground to a halt: all sporting events postponed or canceled, Broadway shuttered, entire states closing schools and businesses, and issuing stay-at-home orders. While these tactics may seem extreme, the goal...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.