The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Care"

Showing 1 - 20 of 180

Your search for posts with tags containing Care found 180 posts

Innovative High School Teaching in Renaissance Studies

The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) recently sponsored a competition for high school teaching in the field of Renaissance Studies. High school teachers across the United States submitted teaching projects and class plans on various topics in Renaissance...

Dutch merchant seamen in Belgian sources

Seafarers have never been bound to a particular flag, which makes it challenging to reconstruct their careers. In this post, Kristof Loockx, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Antwerp and visiting researcher at the Huygens Institute for the...
From: Maritime Careers on 25 May 2021

Teaching Position in History at IMSA

The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy is searching for a new History teacher to teach American and World History to its students. The Academy is a state-supported high school that focuses on preparing talented students for university studies...

Pre-Modern World History Position

University Laboratory High School in Champaign-Urbana is hiring a high school teacher in pre-modern World History. History graduates of the History and Social Science Secondary Educator Licensure Programs at Northern Illinois University may be interested...

Happy Birthday, Mathew Carey!

Though Benjamin Franklin is often considered the patron saint of American advertising in the popular press, I believe that his efforts pale in comparison to the contributions made by Mathew Carey (1760-1839) in the final decades of the eighteenth...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jan 2021

Table Talks I: New Approaches to Romanticism and the Natural World

Check out the recording of our first Table Talk: Table Talks I Recording Thank you to my six wonderful interlocutors: Liz Edwards, Kitty Shaw, Dana Moss, Bethan Roberts, James Lesslie, and Tom Marshall. Thanks also to our fantastic audience...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 17 Dec 2020

Yellow Fever and Church Attendance

John Adams was certain he made a mistake by going to church. Philadelphia’s yellow fever outbreak only ended in November 1793. On Sunday, December... The post Yellow Fever and Church Attendance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Black Mothers Matter: Social Media can Shift the Agenda for Black Maternal Health

On 25th May 2020 the murder of George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black American man, by police officer Derek Chauvin, sent social media into an uproar that reignited the Black Lives Matter Movement. The use of the global hashtag ‘#BLM’ was everywhere:...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 26 Oct 2020

Conference on Illinois History

The annual Conference on Illinois History is currently being held at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Illinois from 5-9 October 2020. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the conference is a virtual event this year, allowing...

Marketing Premodern Studies Beyond Academia

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library recently hosted an online seminar on Marketing Premodern Studies Beyond Academia. This seminar, organized by Christopher Fletcher (Newberry Library) and Lindsey Martin (Northwestern University)...

Not so Ephemeral

I was a casual collector of ephemera for years, so I’ve always been impressed with the more serious seekers and crafters of entire collections, most prominently Eric C. Caren, founder of the Caren Archive of paper Americana. With its tagline “History...
From: streets of salem on 14 Jul 2020

Who was Kitty Clive? Guest post by Dr Berta Joncus

Today I have the honour to host a guest post about the famous 18th-century celebrity, Kitty Clive, by Dr Berta Joncus. Berta is Senior Lecturer in Music at Goldsmiths, University of London. Before joining Goldsmiths, she was at the University of Oxford:...
From: All Things Georgian on 8 Apr 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Brian Patrick O’Malley on Philadelphia’s Yellow Fever Epidemic

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Brian Patrick O’Malley on the social and medical response to the Yellow Fever epidemic that ravaged... The post This Week on Dispatches: Brian Patrick O’Malley...

The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons

“I often thought that the situation of a people in a bombarded city, was not much worse, and on some accounts not so bad;... The post The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Happy Birthday, Mathew Carey!

Though Benjamin Franklin is often considered the patron saint of American advertising in the popular press, I believe that his efforts pale in comparison to the contributions made by Mathew Carey (1760-1839) in the final decades of the eighteenth...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jan 2020

Edmund Keen (1787-1833), the Tragedian

We had thought about writing about his acting career, but we’re sure there are enough websites that provide all of that, so we decided to take a look at the man behind the theatre – if that’s at all possible. There has always been much...
From: All Things Georgian on 15 Oct 2019

How to Freshen Your Face, 1565

John Bulwer, AnthropometamorphosisTake a bean, and having chewed it well, spit it on a cloth, then rub your face with this, and you will make the face beautiful and glowing, and the skin soft.  Isabella Cortese, I segreti de la signora Isabella...
From: Ask the Past on 15 Oct 2019

Page 1 of 9123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.