The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Children"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Children found 616 posts

“Mounted on the goat richly caparisoned for the occasion”

Robert Donkin was born in 1727 and by the eventful year of 1745 was an officer in the British army. In the Seven Years’ War he served as an aide to Gen. Thomas Fowke and Gen. William Rufane. In 1772 Capt. Donkin married Mary Collins, daughter of a clergyman....
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jun 2021

The Later Career of Henry DeBerniere

On 18–19 Apr 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was in the column of British troops that marched to Concord and back. Having visited the town looking for cannon the month before, he was probably one of the main guides for his regimental commander, Lt. Col....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jun 2021

Love, Power, and Gender in Seventeenth-Century French Fairy Tales

By Bronwyn Reddan (Deakin University) In the summer of 2011, I found a nineteenth-century edition of Charles Perrault’s Contes des Fées in a second-hand book shop in La Rochelle, a charming coastal city in western France. This discovery was well-timed...
From: Histories of Emotion on 10 Jun 2021

The Early Career of Henry DeBerniere

Earlier in the year I analyzed a map almost certainly made by Ens. Henry DeBerniere after his scouting expeditions in the Massachusetts countryside in early 1775. I also promised a look at DeBerniere’s career after the outbreak of the Revolutionary...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jun 2021

To a Newborn Child

Frail plant, condemn’d to crouch beneath the storm Of earthly ills, and shiver to the blast     That rules in this cold world     Th’ungenial atmosphere: May thy diminutive and fragile frame Survive the shocks of ev’ry latent...

Count Ugolino and his children in the dungeon

A scene from Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy’ showing Count Ugolino della Gherardesca, Count of Donoratico (c. 1220-1289), an Italian nobleman, politician and naval commander and his sons and grandchildren imprisoned in a dungeon. After Reynolds....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 28 Apr 2021

Homework for Table Talks II

Texts and Rationales for Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society The first Table Talks event went with a bang before Christmas. You can still check out the recording here. Our next event in June promises to be just as exciting...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 31 Mar 2021

“Leslie’s Retreat” Commemorations, 21 Feb.

On 21 Feb 1775, Dr. Benjamin Church secretly told Gen. Thomas Gage that “Twelve pieces of Brass Cannon mounted, are at Salem, & lodged near the North River, on the back of the Town.” Gage was hunting for the brass cannon of the Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Feb 2021

February 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Parents and Masters may depend upon being as well used by sending their Children and Servants, as if present themselves.” Edward Emerson took to the pages of the New-Hampshire...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Feb 2021

London Imprints on Boston Bibles?

In 1756 the Boston Overseers of the Poor indentured Isaiah Thomas as an apprentice to the printer Zechariah Fowle (1724-1776). He was seven years old and didn’t yet know how to read. Isaiah’s father had died, and his mother apparently felt...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2021

How Aged Was William Northage?

This evening I came across an example of the importance of checking original documents where possible to confirm transcriptions.In a 1993 article in the Bulletin of the History of Medicine titled “John Jeffries and the Struggle Against Smallpox...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jan 2021

Tracking Ebenezer Dumaresque

When Dr. Nathaniel Martyn “absconded” in 1770, leaving his wife and two children with her family, he left behind another child as well.Three years earlier, the Boston Overseers of the Poor had indentured a boy named Ebenezer Dumaresque to...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Jan 2021

How Natty Martyn Grew Up

Last September, we got a passing glimpse of fifteen-year-old Natty Martyn, youngest son of the minister in Northborough in 1756. Natty had a bad sore, and his family had begun to despair for him. The Rev. John Martyn took his son to Dr. Ebenezer Dexter...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2021

“May grateful omens now appear, To Make the New a happy Year”

Boston 1775 observed its first new year back in 2007 by establishing an annual tradition of quoting a newspaper carrier verse. Those verses were usually composed, printed, and distributed and/or sung by boys who worked for newspapers as a way to ask for...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Jan 2021

Call for Papers on Phillis Wheatley (Peters)

Early American Literature will publish a special issue on the poet Phillis Wheatley, later called Phillis Peters. Here is the call for papers from the editors of this issue. The recognition that Phillis Wheatley (Peters) is a significant figure in early...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Dec 2020

The Forgotten Trial for the Boston Massacre

On 12 Dec 1770, 250 years ago today, the third trial for the Boston Massacre began.This is the trial that later generations of Bostonians preferred to forget. In 1771 the Loyalist printer John Fleeming published a seven-page report including witness testimony...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Dec 2020

Call for Papers on “Underrepresented Voices of the American Revolution”

The Massachusetts Historical Society and Suffolk University issued this call for papers for a July 2020 conference with the theme “Underrepresented Voices of the American Revolution”:In recent decades, scholars have unearthed and revived stories...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Dec 2020

An Eradication: Empire, Enslaved Children, and the Whitewashing of Vaccine History

By Farren E. Yero On February 12, 1804, at seven in the morning, an eight-year-old girl stood in the living room of Dr. don Tomás Romay. Her arm still throbbed, a slight if persistent hum that seemed to invite her touch. Involuntarily, she reached...
From: Age of Revolutions on 7 Dec 2020

A Juror’s Notes on the Boston Massacre Trial

Edward Pierce (1735-1818) was a carpenter, farmer, and deacon in Dorchester. He came from the family that built and expanded the Pierce House, erected around 1683 and thus one of the oldest surviving structures in the state. The Dorchester Antiquarian...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Dec 2020

The First Mobbing of Jesse Saville

Another event of 1770 that I neglected on its 250th anniversary this year was the mobbing of Jesse Saville.Or rather, the mobbing of Jesse Saville in March 1770, because we have to distinguish that mobbing from several others.To start at the beginning,...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Nov 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.