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Search Results for "Corinne Viglietta"

Your search for posts with tags containing Corinne Viglietta found 11 posts

5 Soliloquies to Teach in This Month of Resolutions

Happy New Year, colleagues! This time of year, there’s a tendency to look inward. We reflect. We resolve. And, if you’re anything like me, you wrestle with your resolutions, too. (Image: Kate Ryan)What better time to take a close look at the...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 7 Jan 2016

Walking the Walk: How DC Public School Teachers Get Inside the Language of Romeo and Juliet

  “Can’t we cut the first two lines? We still know what’s going on if we start with Lady Capulet’s ‘Evermore weeping…’” (Folger Shakespeare Library) “Cut out that whole speech. It’s...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 10 Dec 2015

Varsity Shakespeare: The Lily McKee High School Fellows of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Each school year since 1981, a select group of students from all kinds of schools all over the DC region have gathered at the Folger Shakespeare Library to form a community of learners pursuing big questions about and around Shakespeare. Under the guidance...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 8 Dec 2015

3 Wonderful and Witty Ways to Celebrate Shakespeare’s Birthday

By Folger Education   Shakespeare’s birthday is around the corner (April 23rd), and we’ve been collecting your ideas for celebrating his 451st. To kick off this year’s festivities, we’re thrilled to share these 3 fabulous...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 16 Apr 2015

Enter Poet: Emily Dickinson, the Folger, and a Lock of Hair

By Corinne Viglietta   Happy National Poetry Month! To celebrate, we share with you a special poem inspired by the poet Claudia Emerson’s visit to our very own Folger Shakespeare Library. It’s a beautiful meditation on the life of an author—not...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 9 Apr 2015

Fun with the First Folio

By Corinne Viglietta TSI2014 participants create “folios”. (Photo: James Brantley) Last week, Mike LoMonico shared big news about the national tour of First Folios from the Folger vault. Now that you know where the Folio will be in your state,...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 10 Mar 2015

4 Free and Fabulous Folger Resources You Shouldn’t Miss

By Corinne Viglietta It’s Tech Tuesday, everyone! Looking for a digital image of Paul Robeson’s promptbook for Othello?  Ever wonder what a Pinterest board for The Tempest would look like? Do you want to trace the uses of the word “fair” across...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 10 Feb 2015

5 Great Ways to Start a Shakespeare Unit

by Corinne Viglietta Students working with Shakespeare’s text. (Photo credit: Lloyd Wolf)   New semester, new plays! A lot of teachers are kicking off, or getting ready to kick off, a Shakespeare unit, so we thought we’d talk about what to...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 3 Feb 2015

What’s Shakespeare Got to Do with the Maker Movement?

By Corinne Viglietta   Shakespeare was a maker (39 plays, 154 sonnets, lots of new words, and more), and he wrote about making things, too. In Shakespeare we meet makers of all kinds: noisemakers, grave-makers, jig-makers, hornmakers, peacemakers,...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 27 Jan 2015

What I Learned from the High School Fellowship: A Teacher’s Notes

By Corinne Viglietta Our competitive antedaters use new web tools to find the true origins of words attributed to Shakespeare. We just wrapped up our (exhilarating!) 2014 High School Fellowship, dubbed affectionately by its 16 participants as “Varsity...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 16 Dec 2014

More summer reading recommendations for English teachers

Join us as we add to our list of summer reading recommendations by English teachers and for English teachers! Corinne Viglietta, an English teacher with BASIS DC in Washington, DC, offers these selections: - My first pick is Brian Boyd’s Why...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 19 Jun 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.