The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Drury Lane Theatre"

Your search for posts with tags containing Drury Lane Theatre found 10 posts

Garrick’s Jubilee in London

A fanciful engraving of Garrick performing his Ode By the end of September 1769 Stratford-upon-Avon must have been returning to humdrum normality after the excitement of David Garrick’s Shakespeare Jubilee that had taken over the town earlier in...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 22 Sep 2019

Third time lucky for the actress, Ann Street Barry (1733-1801)

Ann Street was born April 8th, 1733, the daughter of James Street, an eminent apothecary of Bath. Her brother William later became the mayor of Bath.  On March 17th, 1754 at Bedminster, Somerset Ann married the actor, William Dancer who, by all accounts...
From: All Things Georgian on 29 May 2018

Richard Wroughton (1749-1822): Actor

In a previous blog post ‘Miss Jenny Davis as a bride’ we briefly mentioned Richard Wroughton, so thought we would take a closer look at him to see if we could find out anything more about his life. Richard Wroughton as Barnwell. courtesy of...
From: All Things Georgian on 25 Jan 2018

Miss Jenny Davis as a bride, 178

Charles Davis (or Davies) was a painter and artists’ supplier who lived in Bath in the eighteenth-century. In 1778 he placed an advertisement in the Bath Chronicle which both promoted his own business and offered a house in Westgate Buildings for...
From: All Things Georgian on 6 Apr 2017

William Roxby Beverley, a forgotten theatre artist at Stratford-upon-Avon

Photo of the interior of the SMT around 1920 including the drop curtain A couple of weeks ago I was browsing the Stratford-upon-Avon Then and Now Facebook page when I spotted an unusual image posted by David Mills. With nearly 2000 members, this group...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 17 Mar 2017

A Visit from “The Players”

The Visitor Book for Shakespeare’s Birthplace Norma Hampson is a long-standing volunteer at the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive and has written this blog to share details from her current project, listing visitors from the early Birthplace...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 20 May 2015

1814 – The Shakespeare Myths Grow

R. B. Wheler’s manuscript of his Guide to Stratford, 1814.   In 1814 interest in the town of Shakespeare’s birth was growing. An important antiquarian at the time was Robert Bell Wheler who published ‘A Guide to Stratford-upon-Avon’ that...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 27 Jan 2015

Pantomime Snobbery

George Colman the Younger The following piece of criticism appeared in the Monthly Review in 1798:  Blue Beard, or Female Curiosity, a Dramatic Romance, by George Colman, the Younger.  ‘The author of this piece professes that, a pantomime not...
From: Abraham Adcock on 30 Jan 2014

The Acting Career of Mary Darby Robinson (1758–1800) by Lucy Warriner

Gentle readers, some months back Lucy Warriner expressed an interest in writing about Mary Darby Robinson. This past week she submitted this wonderful post about a fascinating and successful woman who embodied the Georgian Era – wife, mother, actress,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Aug 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.