The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Early Canadian History"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Early Canadian History found 102 posts

Entangling the Quebec Act: Transnational Contexts, Meanings, and Legacies in North America and the British Empire – A Review

Ollivier Hubert and François Furstenberg, eds., Entangling the Quebec Act: Transnational Contexts, Meanings, and Legacies in North America and the British Empire (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2020). Adam Nadeau...
From: Borealia on 10 May 2021

La Nouvelle-France, une société du « long Moyen Âge » ? Partie

Arnaud Montreuil Peut-il être intéressant pour les historiens de la Nouvelle-France et du Early Canada de comparer la société néofrançaise à la société médiévale ? Dans le billet...
From: Borealia on 29 Mar 2021

Was New France a society of the “long Middle Ages”? Part

Arnaud Montreuil  Could it be interesting for historians of New France and early Canada to compare New French society to medieval society? In the first part of this post, I suggested that this might be the case, and that this avenue deserves to be...
From: Borealia on 29 Mar 2021

Was New France a society of the “long Middle Ages”?

Arnaud Montreuil With the arrival of the first explorers, then as settlers began to claim land, medieval West burgeoned in the Americas.[1] This is the idea put forward by historian Jérôme Baschet in a series of works, including his book...
From: Borealia on 15 Mar 2021

A root “that our French call rosary”: Foodways in Indigenous and French North America

Renée Girard In early modern France, foraging practices were associated with a ‘primitive’ style of food procurement, with times of dearth, and with poverty. God had given nature to his children for them to control, and agriculture...
From: Borealia on 9 Nov 2020

Teach My Research: Jesuits and Demons in New France

Mairi Cowan [Teach My Research is an occasional series at Borealia to help connect research and teaching, putting the latest scholarship on early Canadian history–Indigenous, French, British, or early national, to about 1900–into our...
From: Borealia on 26 Oct 2020

Success/Failure? Louis Riel and the History of Policing Canada

Max Hamon The toppling of the statue of John A. Macdonald during a protest against policing in downtown Montreal last month was part of a global revolution in public opinion.[1] As Peter Gossage remarked, “this is no longer Macdonald’s Canada.”...
From: Borealia on 21 Sep 2020

The Disappearing Daughters of Jerusalem: Erasing Women from Early Canadian Methodist History

Scott McLaren “The greater part of an author’s time is spent in reading,” Samuel Johnson is widely reported to have said. “He must turn over half a library to write one book.” What Johnson didn’t say is that in the...
From: Borealia on 16 Sep 2020

The Readers called Methodists: A Review of Pulpit, Press, and Politics

Todd Webb Scott McLaren, Pulpit, Press, and Politics: Methodists and the Market for Books in Upper Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) By the early 1860s, Methodism had become the largest Protestant denomination in the future provinces...
From: Borealia on 14 Sep 2020

Teach my Research: Food, Colonization, and Religion in New France

Mairi Cowan and Whitney Hahn [Teach My Researchis a new occasional series at Borealiato help connect research and teaching, putting the latest scholarship on early Canadian history–Indigenous, French, British, or early national, to about 1900–into...
From: Borealia on 13 Jul 2020

Une épopée corsaire au Canada atlantique durant le régime français

Nicolas Landry  Nul besoin d’insister sur le fait que la guerre de course et les corsaires n’occupent pas une grande place dans l’historiographie militaire de la Nouvelle-France. Du moins, pas au même titre que les troupes...
From: Borealia on 15 Jun 2020

New Books in Early Canadian History, May-December

Dani Reimer and Keith Grant Welcome to Borealia’s Spring 2020 roundup of forthcoming books on early Canadian history. The list is drawn from publishers’ catalogues and websites, featuring books scheduled for release between now and the end...
From: Borealia on 25 May 2020

The Militia and Civic Community in Colonial New Brunswick: Part I, 1786-1816

Service militaire, citoyenneté et culture politique : études des milices au Canada atlantique Nous vous présentons le premier texte d’une série de contributions qui seront publiées au cours des prochaines...
From: Borealia on 18 May 2020

Women Also Know Loyalists

Rebecca Brannon, Lauren Duval, and Kacy Tillman [Welcome to part two of a conversation among three historians of the American Revolution, focusing on new directions in loyalist studies. In the first part, Professors Brannon, Duval, and Tillman discussed...
From: Borealia on 6 May 2020

Women Also Know Revolution

Rebecca Brannon, Lauren Duval, and Kacy Tillman [Welcome to part one of a conversation among three historians of the American Revolution, focusing on the political agency and experiences of women. In the second part, Brannon, Duval, and Tillman turn their...
From: Borealia on 4 May 2020

Quarantine in the Northwest: The Hudson’s Bay Company’s Measures to Stop the 1779-1783 Smallpox Epidemic

Scott Berthelette Near the end of the summer of 1782, Hudson’s Bay Company chief factor of York Factory, Matthew Cocking lamented: “Never has a Letter in Hudson’s Bay conveyed more doleful Tidings than this… Much the greatest...
From: Borealia on 30 Mar 2020

Introducing the CRKN Canadiana & Héritage Digital Collections

Who is CRKN? The Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) is a partnership of 79 Canadian universities and institutions dedicated to expanding digital content for the academic research and teaching enterprise in Canada. CRKN was formed in 1999 to increase...
From: Borealia on 23 Oct 2019

The Business of Transnational History: An Editor’s Perspective

Michael J. McGandy [Michael McGandy is Senior Editor at Cornell University Press, with a keen sense of the field of early North American history. Borealia’s Keith Grant recently sat down with him (virtually) to talk about how transnational history,...
From: Borealia on 9 Sep 2019

The French Colonial Historical Society, Longueuil, 2019: A Template for Early Canadian History?

Samuel Derksen The 45th Annual Meeting of the French Colonial Historical Society (FCHS) was held from June 13-15 at the Université de Sherbrooke campus in Longueuil, Quebec. In many ways, Longueuil was a perfect setting for reflection about French...
From: Borealia on 2 Jul 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.