The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "East End"

Your search for posts with tags containing East End found 9 posts

Bringing Sextons Back: Stepney’s Buriers, Bearers and Searchers of the Dead

In my last post, I introduced the maritime hamlets of early modern Stepney and explored some of the ways in which the parish’s middling sort used admin and officeholding to establish themselves as part of a local elite. Returning to the vestry minutes...
From: Middling Culture on 13 Nov 2020

The Three Ladies of London and Red Lion workshop, 22 January 2017

Our handout from the event can be downloaded here: three-ladies-and-rl-workshop-handout and photos can be found at Media > Workshops. Our first workshop with The Dolphin’s Back took place yesterday (22 January 2017), exploring...
From: Before Shakespeare on 23 Jan 2017

The Before Shakespeare Guide to the Elizabethan East End

Summer 1567.  A feature piece for Elizabethan developers, house buyers, tourists, and those interested in keeping up with the latest cultural developments just outside of the City of London.  In this feature, we tell you why it might just...
From: Before Shakespeare on 14 Nov 2016

London Trip: Day Three

Gosh, it seems like AGES ago that we got back from our impromptu family visit to London and I still haven’t finished bombarding you with posts about what we saw while we were there! Never mind, here’s the last update – which might turn...
From: Madame Guillotine on 24 Jul 2015

Museum of London Docklands

As a huge fan of the Museum of London and someone with an interest in, shall we say, the grittier side of London’s rich and chequered history, I can’t believe that it took me so long to finally pay my first visit to the Museum of London’s Docklands...
From: Madame Guillotine on 5 Jan 2015

From Whitechapel is out in paperback!

“This is Melanie Clegg’s best book yet. Her encyclopaedic knowledge of the period allows the reader to relax into the story and be swept along.” Rachael Lucas Set against the Jack the Ripper murders of 1888 the lives of three women intertwine as...
From: Madame Guillotine on 25 Sep 2014

Edward Fish at the sign of the Sun in Wapping

A farthing token issued in the name of the Edward Fish of Wapping The brass farthing token, pictured above, measures 15.9 mm and weighs 0.80 grams. It was issued by Edward Fish, a pewterer trading at or by the sign of the Sun in Wapping, Middlesex. The...
From: Mr. Pepys' Small Change on 25 Dec 2013

They shall not pass – the Battle of Cable Street, 1936

Like a lot of people who come from old East End families, the fourth of October is pretty much engraved on my heart as the date of the Battle of Cable Street, when over a hundred thousand Londoners (as might be expected, accounts vary about the numbers...
From: Madame Guillotine on 4 Oct 2013

Save the Marquis of Lansdowne!

SAVE THE GIN! Wearing my Cockney necklace with PRIDE here – I may not have been born in the East End but I was raised by a bone fide Cockney and have always considered myself one culturally. As you all know, I am DEEPLY passionate about the history...
From: Madame Guillotine on 31 Mar 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.