The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Edes and Gill"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Edes and Gill found 107 posts

May 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “AN ORATION … to COMMEMORATE the BLOODY TRAGEDY.” In the spring of 1771, colonists had several opportunities to purchase memorabilia that marked the first anniversary...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 May 2021

April 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “INNOCENT BLOOD CRYING TO GOD FROM THE STREETS OF BOSTON.” When ships from England arrived in American ports in the spring of 1771, they delivered news of reactions...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Apr 2021

The Aftermath of the Second Boston Tea Party

Yesterday I discussed the political effect of the second Boston Tea Party in London. Today I’ll wrap up this topic with a look at the ripples from the event in Massachusetts. Five local men were linked to the shipment of tea on the Fortune. All...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Mar 2021

“King of the Narragansett tribe of Indians”?

The second Boston Tea Party cemented the “Indian disguises” aspect of the events. On the morning after the Fortune arrived in Boston harbor, the report in Edes and Gill’s radical Boston Gazette ended by saying: The SACHEMS must have...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Mar 2021

March 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Feast of ST. PATRICK is to be celebrated, together with the Repeal of the STAMP-ACT.” According to advertisements in the New-York Journal in February and March...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Mar 2021

“Emptied and threw the Tea into the Water”

On Sunday, 6 Mar 1774, as described yesterday, the brig Fortune carried 28 1/2 chests of tea into Boston harbor, along with “Gun-Powder, Duck and Hemp.” “The next day,” Gov. Thomas Hutchinson wrote, “the vessel was haled...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Mar 2021

A Short Narrative “from the London Edition”?

On 16 July 1770, six days after the Boston town meeting reaffirmed its ban on selling copies of its Short Narrative of the Horrid Massacre locally, this advertisement appeared in the Boston Evening-Post:Next WEDNESDAY will be Published,[from the London...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2021

“The printed Narratives of the late horred Massacre”

This week I watched an online talk by Robert Darnton about his new book Pirating and Publishing: The Book Trade in the Age of Enlightenment. He described various stratagems printers and booksellers used to get around two stifling forces in ancien régime...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2021

Press Coverage of the Owen Richards Riot

On 21 May 1770, Green and Russell’s Boston Post-Boy reported: Last Friday Night Owen Richards, one of the Tidesmen belonging to the Custom-House, was Tarred, Feathered and Carted thro’ the Town for several hours, for having as ’tis...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Dec 2020

“See the Court cheat the injurd people With a Shew of Justice”

It should be no surprise that Bostonians continued to wrangle over the Boston Massacre trials even after they ended with two manslaughter convictions and eleven acquittals. One response was recounted by Thomas Hutchinson in the last volume of his history...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Dec 2020

“Considering the Non-importation Agreement to be broke”

By this week in October 1770, 250 years ago, the Boston Whigs knew that the North American non-importation movement had collapsed. As I discussed back here, early that month the Boston Gazette printed a letter from Philadelphia reporting that some of...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Oct 2020

The Big News in Boston 250 Years Ago

On 1 Oct 1770, 250 years ago today, the Boston Gazette ran three major pieces of news. The first item came from Philadelphia, where on 12 September a group of seventeen merchants had published a public letter saying:Many of the inhabitants of this City,...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Oct 2020

August 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “They have Removed their PRINTING-OFFICE two Doors lower down Queen-Street.” Colonial printers adopted various strategies when it came to inserting advertisements...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Aug 2020

“Assertions that Salem, Marblehead and Newbury had departed”

On 31 July 1770, Faneuil Hall hosted another meeting of “The Trade and Inhabitants of the Town of Boston.” The group of people invited to participate had widened again to include not just businessmen but all “Inhabitants.” Per...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Aug 2020

“America’s Summer Road Trip,” 1 Aug.

When History Camp Boston and then other History Camps had to be canceled this year because of the pandemic, the organizers of The Pursuit of History looked for another way to share historical information with the public. Lee Wright and Carrie Lund have...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jul 2020

“A general aversion to truth, honesty, peace and good order”

Yesterday I quoted a letter published in the Boston Evening-Post and Boston Gazette in July 1770, alleging that supporters of the Marlborough importer Henry Barnes had roughed up a “young lad” with “edged weapons.” On 25 July someone...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jul 2020

Assault on a “young lad” in Marlborough

Now to get back to events in Marlborough in July 1770.Back here I quoted a letter published in the Boston Gazette on 30 July 1770, describing an effigy of local merchant Henry Barnes on horseback. And here I quoted the part of that article discussing...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jul 2020

A Meeting to Protect the Town’s Reputation

Back in late March 1770, the Boston town meeting had commissioned Capt. Andrew Gardner to carry its official report on the Boston Massacre and other documents to London. Gardner arrived in the imperial capital in early May. That was a couple of weeks...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jul 2020

An Effigy on Horseback in Marlborough

When we left merchant Henry Barnes sometimes in June 1770, his Marlborough neighbors had just hanged him in effigy.A letter from Marlborough dated 20 July and published in Edes and Gill’s Boston Gazette for 30 July gave some Whiggish townspeople’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jul 2020

“On Election Day a Sermon will be preached”

Election Day was a holiday in colonial Massachusetts. Not the day that people voted for their General Court representatives—that happened in town meetings, and each town could choose its own date.Rather, Election Day was when the new legislature...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 May 2020

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